Special Issue "Plasmonics and Nano-Optics from UV to THz: Materials and Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanophotonics Materials and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Fernando Moreno
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Group of Optics, Department of Applied Physics, University of Cantabria, Avda. Los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander, Spain
Interests: optics; nano-optics; light scattering; biophotonics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Yael Gutiérrez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Applied Physics, University of Cantabria, Avda. Los Castros, s/n., 39005 Santander, Spain
Interests: Plasmonics; Nano-Optics; Nanomaterials; Photocatalysis
Prof. Dr. Francisco González
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Applied Physics, University of Cantabria, Avda. Los Castros, s/n., 39005 Santander, Spain
Interests: Light scattering; Plasmonics; Optical spectroscopies; Color; Biosensing
Prof. Dr. Maria Losurdo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Nanotechnology, CNR-NANOTEC, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari, Italy
Interests: Nanomaterials; Nanofabrication; Optical spectroscopies; Photocatalysis; Energy harvesting and storage; Nanophotonics; Plasmonics; Biosensing and their applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The study of light–matter interactions at the nanoscale has attracted the attention of researchers for the last two decades, giving rise to a new discipline: Nano-optics. The control of light at the diffraction limit, or even below it, is inside their main study goals. Passive plasmonic nanostructures made of metals (and in combination with dielectrics and/or semiconductors) have provided new practical and efficient tools that have enabled endless possibilities in many different and complementary fields such as matter analysis, optical communications, photocatalysis, biology, medicine, metamaterials, etc. With the evolution of this blooming field, not only metals but also nanostructures made of dielectrics with a high refractive index and low losses (like many semiconductors at the VIS-NIR ranges) have been studied. They have been shown to be highly efficient in governing the directionality of scattered light and building new materials whose optical properties can be selected “à la carte” (chirality, for instance). In light of recent technological developments, new trends in nano-optics aim to go beyond passive plasmonic platforms, resulting in the dawn of active plasmonics. This new field focuses in the study of new plasmonic systems with a reconfigurable optical response controlled by external stimulus.

This Special Issue is intended to gather among others, recent research results on resonant phenomena in nanostructures made of metals and/or dielectrics for applications in nano-optics, with a special emphasis on plasmonics with transdimensional materials whose phase can be controlled in a wide spectral range with low losses and fast response. The main goal is building multifunctional and reconfigurable optical devices (multiservice antennas, all-optical switches, etc.). Part of the results contained in this Special Issue will be framed in our recent EC granted H2020-FETOPEN project PHEMTRONICS (#899598).

Prof. Dr. Fernando Moreno
Dr. Yael Gutiérrez
Prof. Dr. Francisco González
Prof. Dr. Maria Losurdo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Plasmonic materials
  • Phase-change materials
  • Surface-enhanced spectroscopy (SERS, SERRS, TERS ...)
  • Photocatalysis
  • Reconfigurable plasmonics
  • Chiral plasmonics
  • Metasurfaces
  • Nanofabrication and material synthesis
  • Computational optical properties

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Near-Field Excitation of Bound States in the Continuum in All-Dielectric Metasurfaces through a Coupled Electric/Magnetic Dipole Model
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(4), 998; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11040998 - 13 Apr 2021
Viewed by 349
Abstract
Resonant optical modes arising in all-dielectric metasurfaces have attracted much attention in recent years, especially when so-called bound states in the continuum (BICs) with diverging lifetimes are supported. With the aim of studying theoretically the emergence of BICs, we extend a coupled electric [...] Read more.
Resonant optical modes arising in all-dielectric metasurfaces have attracted much attention in recent years, especially when so-called bound states in the continuum (BICs) with diverging lifetimes are supported. With the aim of studying theoretically the emergence of BICs, we extend a coupled electric and magnetic dipole analytical formulation to deal with the proper metasurface Green function for the infinite lattice. Thereby, we show how to excite metasurface BICs, being able to address their near-field pattern through point-source excitation and their local density of states. We apply this formulation to fully characterize symmetry-protected BICs arising in all-dielectric metasurfaces made of Si nanospheres, revealing their near-field pattern and local density of states, and, thus, the mechanisms precluding their radiation into the continuum. This formulation provides, in turn, an insightful and fast tool to characterize BICs (and any other leaky/guided mode) near fields in all-dielectric (and also plasmonic) metasurfaces, which might be especially useful for the design of planar nanophotonic devices based on such resonant modes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonics and Nano-Optics from UV to THz: Materials and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Tunable Thermal Camouflage Based on GST Plasmonic Metamaterial
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(2), 260; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11020260 - 20 Jan 2021
Viewed by 512
Abstract
Thermal radiation control has attracted increasing attention in a wide range of field, including infrared detection, radiative cooling, thermal management, and thermal camouflage. Previously reported thermal emitters for thermal camouflage presented disadvantages of lacking either tunability or thermal stability. In this paper, we [...] Read more.
Thermal radiation control has attracted increasing attention in a wide range of field, including infrared detection, radiative cooling, thermal management, and thermal camouflage. Previously reported thermal emitters for thermal camouflage presented disadvantages of lacking either tunability or thermal stability. In this paper, we propose a tunable thermal emitter consisting of metal-insulator-metal (MIM) plasmonic metamaterial based on phase-change material Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) to realize tunable control of thermal radiation in wavelength ranges from 3 μm to 14 μm. Meanwhile, the proposed thermal emitter possesses near unity emissivity at the wavelength of 6.3 μm to increase radiation heat dissipation, maintaining the thermal stability of the system. The underlying mechanism relies on fundamental magnetic resonance and the interaction between the high-order magnetic resonance and anti-reflection resonance. When the environmental background is blackbody, the tunable emitter maintains signal reduction rates greater than 80% in middle-IR and longer-IR regions from 450 K to 800 K and from room temperature to 800 K, respectively. The dependences of thermal camouflage on crystallization fraction of GST, incident angles and polarization angles have been investigated in detail. In addition, the thermal emitter can continuously realize thermal camouflage for various background temperatures and environmental background in atmospheric window in the range of 3–5 μm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonics and Nano-Optics from UV to THz: Materials and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Non-Absorbing Dielectric Materials for Surface-Enhanced Spectroscopies and Chiral Sensing in the UV
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(10), 2078; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10102078 - 21 Oct 2020
Viewed by 550
Abstract
Low-loss dielectric nanomaterials are being extensively studied as novel platforms for enhanced light-matter interactions. Dielectric materials are more versatile than metals when nanostructured as they are able to generate simultaneously electric- and magnetic-type resonances. This unique property gives rise to a wide gamut [...] Read more.
Low-loss dielectric nanomaterials are being extensively studied as novel platforms for enhanced light-matter interactions. Dielectric materials are more versatile than metals when nanostructured as they are able to generate simultaneously electric- and magnetic-type resonances. This unique property gives rise to a wide gamut of new phenomena not observed in metal nanostructures such as directional scattering conditions or enhanced optical chirality density. Traditionally studied dielectrics such as Si, Ge or GaP have an operating range constrained to the infrared and/or the visible range. Tuning their resonances up to the UV, where many biological samples of interest exhibit their absorption bands, is not possible due to their increased optical losses via heat generation. Herein, we report a quantitative survey on the UV optical performance of 20 different dielectric nanostructured materials for UV surface light-matter interaction based applications. The near-field intensity and optical chirality density averaged over the surface of the nanoparticles together with the heat generation are studied as figures of merit for this comparative analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonics and Nano-Optics from UV to THz: Materials and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Hybrid Electro-Optical Pumping of Active Plasmonic Nanostructures
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 856; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050856 - 29 Apr 2020
Viewed by 1124
Abstract
Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) offer a unique opportunity to overcome the diffraction limit of light. However, this opportunity comes at the cost of the strong absorption of the SPP field in a metal, which unavoidably limits the SPP propagation length to a few [...] Read more.
Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) offer a unique opportunity to overcome the diffraction limit of light. However, this opportunity comes at the cost of the strong absorption of the SPP field in a metal, which unavoidably limits the SPP propagation length to a few tens of micrometers in nanostructures with deep-subwavelength mode confinement. The only possibility to avoid the propagation losses is to compensate for them by optical gain in the adjacent active medium. Different approaches for surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation have been proposed based on either optical or electrical pumping. However, each has its own disadvantages caused by the selected type of pumping scheme. Here, we study, for the first time, hybrid electro-optical pumping of active plasmonic waveguide structures, and by using comprehensive self-consistent numerical simulations, demonstrate that this hybrid approach can outperform both pure electrical pumping and pure optical pumping. The SPP modal gain is higher than under pure optical pumping, while one can precisely and locally adjust it by tuning the electric current, which allows the reduction of amplification noise and provides additional functionalities. We believe that our findings lay a solid foundation for the development of a new generation of active plasmonic devices and stimulate further research in this area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonics and Nano-Optics from UV to THz: Materials and Applications)
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