Special Issue "Nanomaterials Engineering through Surface Functionalization"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Synthesis, Interfaces and Nanostructures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Luigi Sangaletti
Website
Guest Editor
Mathematics and Physics Department, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Italy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Nanomaterials will cover the most recent advances from experimental and theoretical studies in functionalization strategies for nanostructured platforms. The demand of engineered nanostructures has increased in the recent years, boosted by, e.g., the need for novel concepts in energy harvesting and storage, in sensing for diffuse environmental monitoring and health screening, as well as by the increasing impact of the IoT, demanding portability and self-powering. One way to engineer nanostructured materials is through functionalization, which can be achieved in different ways once a nanostructured platform has been created. Among these methods, the most popular rely on the addition of nanoparticles, nanorods, nanosheets of metals, metal oxides, semiconductors, and carbon-based nanomaterials. Another promising functionalization method is represented by the growth of ultrathin layers, including molecular layers, on nanostructured platforms leading to the formation of heterojunctions.

This Special Issue calls for papers on all experimental and theoretical studies in various aspects of nanostructured platform engineering through functionalization strategies. Experimental studies include the functionalization of nanostructured platforms and the characterization of their physical and chemical properties, including in situ, operando, and time-resolved spectroscopy probes, as well as the testing of device performances. Theoretical studies include ab initio simulation of the physical and chemical properties of nanostructures, surfaces, and heterointerfaces.

Dr. Luigi Sangaletti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • functionalization
  • nanostructures
  • nanoparticles
  • 2D materials
  • heterostructures
  • sensing
  • photovoltaics
  • photocatalysis
  • energy harvesting
  • energy storage
  • ab initio calculations
  • in situ, operando, and time-resolved spectroscopies

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
One Dimensional ZnO Nanostructures: Growth and Chemical Sensing Performances
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(10), 1940; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10101940 - 29 Sep 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Recently, one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures have attracted the scientific community attention as sensitive materials for conductometric chemical sensors. However, finding facile and low-cost techniques for their production, controlling the morphology and the aspect ratio of these nanostructures is still challenging. In this study, we [...] Read more.
Recently, one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures have attracted the scientific community attention as sensitive materials for conductometric chemical sensors. However, finding facile and low-cost techniques for their production, controlling the morphology and the aspect ratio of these nanostructures is still challenging. In this study, we report the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) synthesis of one dimensional (1D) zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) and nanowires (NWs) by using different metal catalysts and their impact on the performances of conductometric chemical sensors. In VLS mechanism, catalysts are of great interest due to their role in the nucleation and the crystallization of 1D nanostructures. Here, Au, Pt, Ag and Cu nanoparticles (NPs) were used to grow 1D ZnO. Depending on catalyst nature, different morphology, geometry, size and nanowires/nanorods abundance were established. The mechanism leading to the VLS growth of 1D ZnO nanostructures and the transition from nanorods to nanowires have been interpreted. The formation of ZnO crystals exhibiting a hexagonal crystal structure was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and ZnO composition was identified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) mapping. The chemical sensing characteristics showed that 1D ZnO has good and fast response, good stability and selectivity. ZnO (Au) showed the best performances towards hydrogen (H2). At the optimal working temperature of 350 °C, the measured response towards 500 ppm of H2 was 300 for ZnO NWs and 50 for ZnO NRs. Moreover, a good selectivity to hydrogen was demonstrated over CO, acetone and ethanol. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials Engineering through Surface Functionalization)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop