Special Issue "Electrochemical Sensing Applications of Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanoelectronics, Nanosensors and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Katarzyna Siuzdak
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Robert Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Gdansk, Poland
Interests: nanomaterials; thin films and nanotechnology; photoactivity; sensors; anodization; electrochemical characterization; organic/inorganic heterostructures; energy storage; surface modification and doping; surface plasmon resonance; laser treatment; titania nanostructures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The scope of this Special Issue covers nanomaterials that are formed onto conductive substrates and exhibit enhanced response to changes in the electrolyte environment. Day by day, we observe the impressive development of various physico-chemical synthesis methods and characterization techniques that enable us to control the geometry of obtained materials and reveal their unique properties. It is common knowledge that within the nanoscale, morphology is strictly related to material properties, and those with at least one dimension within the nano-range possess excellent electrical, optical, thermal, and catalytic activity. Those features offer great opportunities to construct nanomaterial-based sensing platforms, e.g., for monitoring of drugs, sugar, and environmental pollution. Among others, noble and bimetallic metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanorods, silicon nanopillars, boron-doped nanodiamonds, and both carbon and TiO2 nanotubes have been recently explored. Those structures could be formed via different methods: sol–gel, physical vapour and atomic layer deposition, anodization, hydrothermal methods, or with the support of lithography. However, it should be kept in mind that, regarding expected electrochemical response, synthesis should enable the formation of the nanomaterial directly onto the conductive substrate or additional immobilization has to be applied. Such an approach ensures further charge collection. For complete investigations, the characterization of the material exhibiting sensing properties should include determination of the following parameters: sensitivity, linear range of response, and detection limit. Moreover, if possible, characterization of the electrochemical behaviour in the presence of a real sample would be beneficial.

In particular, topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Fabrication method of nanomaterials exhibiting increased sensitivity toward selected analytes;
  • Nanomaterials modified with biological species, namely enzymes, and DNA strains exhibiting highly selective responses;
  • Immobilization methods or usage of synthesis methods ensuring attachment of the nanomaterial to the conductive substrate enabling electrochemical readout;
  • Usage of screen-printed electrodes as a facile approach toward further commercialization;
  • Demonstration of the hybrid sensing performance, e.g., opto-electrochemical response, where both changes in optical and electrochemical response are used for detection.
Prof. Dr. Katarzyna Siuzdak
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • electrochemical methods
  • sensitivity
  • conducting substrate
  • immobilization

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
A Label-Free DNA-Immunosensor Based on Aminated rGO Electrode for the Quantification of DNA Methylation
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(4), 985; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11040985 - 12 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1003
Abstract
In this work, we developed a sandwich DNA-immunosensor for quantification of the methylated tumour suppressor gene O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), which is a potential biomarker for brain tumours and breast cancer. The biosensor is based on aminated reduced graphene oxide electrode, which is achieved [...] Read more.
In this work, we developed a sandwich DNA-immunosensor for quantification of the methylated tumour suppressor gene O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), which is a potential biomarker for brain tumours and breast cancer. The biosensor is based on aminated reduced graphene oxide electrode, which is achieved by ammonium hydroxide chemisorption and anti-5-methylcytosine (anti-5mC) as a methylation bioreceptor. The target single-strand (ss) MGMT oligonucleotide is first recognised by its hybridisation with complementary DNA to form double-stranded (ds) MGMT, which is then captured by anti-5mC on the electrode surface due to the presence of methylation. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were used to characterise the electrode surface. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) techniques were used for electrochemical measurements. Under optimised conditions, the proposed biosensor is able to quantify a linear range of concentrations of the MGMT gene from 50 fM to 100 pM with a limit of detection (LOD) of 12 fM. The sandwich design facilitates the simultaneous recognition and quantification of DNA methylation, and the amination significantly improves the sensitivity of the biosensor. This biosensor is label-, bisulfite- and PCR-free and has a simple design for cost-efficient production. It can also be tailor-made to detect other methylated genes, which makes it a promising detection platform for DNA methylation-related disease diagnosis and prognosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical Sensing Applications of Nanomaterials)
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Article
A Molecularly Imprinted Sol-Gel Electrochemical Sensor for Naloxone Determination
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(3), 631; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11030631 - 03 Mar 2021
Viewed by 771
Abstract
A molecularly imprinted sol-gel is reported for selective and sensitive electrochemical determination of the drug naloxone (NLX). The sensor was developed by combining molecular imprinting and sol-gel techniques and electrochemically grafting the sol solution onto a functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube modified indium-tin oxide [...] Read more.
A molecularly imprinted sol-gel is reported for selective and sensitive electrochemical determination of the drug naloxone (NLX). The sensor was developed by combining molecular imprinting and sol-gel techniques and electrochemically grafting the sol solution onto a functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube modified indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrode. The sol-gel layer was obtained from acid catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of a solution composed of triethoxyphenylsilane (TEPS) and tetraethoxysilane (TES). The fabrication, structure and properties of the sensing material were characterized via scanning electron microscopy, spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques. Parameters affecting the sensor’s performance were evaluated and optimized. A sensor fabricated under the optimized conditions responded linearly between 0.0 µM and 12 µM NLX, with a detection limit of 0.02 µM. The sensor also showed good run-to-run repeatability and batch-to-batch performance reproducibility with relative standard deviations (RSD) of 2.5–7.8% (n = 3) and 9.2% (n = 4), respectively. The developed sensor displayed excellent selectivity towards NLX compared to structurally similar compounds (codeine, fentanyl, naltrexone and noroxymorphone), and was successfully used to measure NLX in synthetic urine samples yielding recoveries greater than 88%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical Sensing Applications of Nanomaterials)
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Review

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Review
Enzyme Immobilization on Gold Nanoparticles for Electrochemical Glucose Biosensors
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(5), 1156; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11051156 - 28 Apr 2021
Viewed by 656
Abstract
More than 50 years have passed since Clark and Lyon developed the concept of glucose biosensors. Extensive research about biosensors has been carried out up to this day, and an exponential trend in this topic can be observed. The scope of this review [...] Read more.
More than 50 years have passed since Clark and Lyon developed the concept of glucose biosensors. Extensive research about biosensors has been carried out up to this day, and an exponential trend in this topic can be observed. The scope of this review is to present various enzyme immobilization methods on gold nanoparticles used for glucose sensing over the past five years. This work covers covalent bonding, adsorption, cross-linking, entrapment, and self-assembled monolayer methods. The experimental approach of each modification as well as further results are described. Designated values of sensitivity, the limit of detection, and linear range are used for the comparison of immobilization techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical Sensing Applications of Nanomaterials)
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Review
Application of Electrochemical Sensors Based on Carbon Nanomaterials for Detection of Flavonoids
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(10), 2020; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10102020 - 14 Oct 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 1026
Abstract
Flavonoids have a variety of physiological activities such as anti-free radicals, regulating hormone levels, antibacterial factors, and anti-cancer factors, which are widely present in edible and medicinal plants. Real-time detection of flavonoids is a key step in the quality control of diverse matrices [...] Read more.
Flavonoids have a variety of physiological activities such as anti-free radicals, regulating hormone levels, antibacterial factors, and anti-cancer factors, which are widely present in edible and medicinal plants. Real-time detection of flavonoids is a key step in the quality control of diverse matrices closely related to social, economic, and health issues. Traditional detection methods are time-consuming and require expensive equipment and complicated working conditions. Therefore, electrochemical sensors with high sensitivity and fast detection speed have aroused extensive research interest. Carbon nanomaterials are preferred material in improving the performance of electrochemical sensing. In this paper, we review the progress of electrochemical sensors based on carbon nanomaterials including carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon and graphene quantum dots, mesoporous carbon, and carbon black for detecting flavonoids in food and drug homologous substances in the last four years. In addition, we look forward to the prospects and challenges of this research field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical Sensing Applications of Nanomaterials)
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