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Special Issue "Next Generation Electrode Material"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Electrochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Gregorio F. Ortiz
Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Química Inorgánica e Ingeniería Química, Instituto Universitario de Investigación en Química Fina y Nanoquímica (IUNAN), Universidad de Córdoba, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Marie Curie, E-14071 Córdoba, Spain
Interests: energy storage; nanomaterials; Li- and Na-ion batteries; cathodes; anodes; Mg and hybrids batteries; electrolytes; thin films; composites; electrochemistry; chemical characterization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The fabrication of electrode materials is of great importance for many applications worldwide. This Special Issue is focused on experimental/theoretical studies that report the synthesis, properties, applications, and new aspects of electrode materials.

Electrode materials prepared by different synthesis routes have shown diverse properties in the field of energy storage and conversion. One of the most impressive syntheses of materials was the report of Ti-based nanotubes, nanowires, or nanocomposites arranged in a parallel fashion and used either as electrodes or templates. Such electrode nanoarchitecture allows for the obtaining of binder-free electrodes, increasing the capacity by several orders of magnitude. Additionally, the introduction of surface heteroatoms (e.g., nitrogen) into carbon nanomaterials can cause electron modulation to provide desirable electronic structures. The eventual in-situ or ex-situ doping/coating often lead to surface functionalization of electrodes, which leads to enhanced properties with potential applications of practical significance.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Electrode materials for energy storage and conversion;
  • Li-ion and post Li-ion batteries (Na-ion, Mg-ion, hybrids, etc.);
  • Carbon nanomaterials;
  • Synthesis of organic/inorganic materials;
  • Thin films (CVD, PVD, electro-less, etc.);
  • Electrolytes formulation (solid state, additives, etc.);
  • Electrodes from biomass;
  • Electrode/electrolyte interfaces;
  • Supercapacitors;
  • Redox-flow batteries, Li-S, Na-S;
  • Solar cells;
  • Fuel cells;
  • Catalysts;

Prof. Dr. Gregorio F. Ortiz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanostructured materials
  • renewable energy systems
  • high energy electrodes
  • redox properties
  • lithium
  • Na+/Mg2+ insertion
  • pseudocapacitance
  • coatings
  • organic/inorganic compounds

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Recognition of V3+/V4+/V5+ Multielectron Reactions in Na3V(PO4)2: A Potential High Energy Density Cathode for Sodium-Ion Batteries
Molecules 2020, 25(4), 1000; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25041000 - 24 Feb 2020
Abstract
Na3V(PO4)2 was reported recently as a novel cathode material with high theoretical energy density for Sodium-ion batteries (SIBs). However, whether V3+/V4+/V5+ multielectron reactions can be realized during the charging process is still an [...] Read more.
Na3V(PO4)2 was reported recently as a novel cathode material with high theoretical energy density for Sodium-ion batteries (SIBs). However, whether V3+/V4+/V5+ multielectron reactions can be realized during the charging process is still an open question. In this work, Na3V(PO4)2 is synthesized by using a solid-state method. Its atomic composition and crystal structure are verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and neutron diffraction (ND) joint refinement. The electrochemical performance of Na3V(PO4)2 is evaluated in two different voltage windows, namely 2.5–3.8 and 2.5–4.3 V. 51V solid-state NMR (ssNMR) results disclose the presence of V5+ in Na2−xV(PO4)2 when charging Na3V(PO4)2 to 4.3 V, confirming Na3V(PO4)2 is a potential high energy density cathode through realization of V3+/V4+/V5+ multielectron reactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Next Generation Electrode Material)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Sustainable and Environmentally Friendly Na and Mg Aqueous Hybrid Batteries Using Na and K Birnessites
Molecules 2020, 25(4), 924; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25040924 - 19 Feb 2020
Abstract
Sodium and magnesium batteries with intercalation electrodes are currently alternatives of great interest to lithium in stationary applications, such as distribution networks or renewable energies. Hydrated laminar oxides such as birnessites are an attractive cathode material for these batteries. Sodium and potassium birnessite [...] Read more.
Sodium and magnesium batteries with intercalation electrodes are currently alternatives of great interest to lithium in stationary applications, such as distribution networks or renewable energies. Hydrated laminar oxides such as birnessites are an attractive cathode material for these batteries. Sodium and potassium birnessite samples have been synthesized by thermal and hydrothermal oxidation methods. Hybrid electrochemical cells have been built using potassium birnessite in aqueous sodium electrolyte, when starting in discharge and with a capacity slightly higher than 70 mA h g−1. Hydrothermal synthesis generally shows slightly poorer electrochemical behavior than their thermal counterparts in both sodium and potassium batteries. The study on hybrid electrolytes has resulted in the successful galvanostatic cycling of both sodium birnessite and potassium birnessite in aqueous magnesium electrolyte, with maximum capacities of 85 and 50 mA h g−1, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Next Generation Electrode Material)
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Open AccessCommunication
Thermal Decomposition Study on Li2O2 for Li2NiO2 Synthesis as a Sacrificing Positive Additive of Lithium-Ion Batteries
Molecules 2019, 24(24), 4624; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24244624 - 17 Dec 2019
Abstract
Herein, thermal decomposition experiments of lithium peroxide (Li2O2) were performed to prepare a precursor (Li2O) for sacrificing cathode material, Li2NiO2. The Li2O2 was prepared by a hydrometallurgical reaction between LiOH·H [...] Read more.
Herein, thermal decomposition experiments of lithium peroxide (Li2O2) were performed to prepare a precursor (Li2O) for sacrificing cathode material, Li2NiO2. The Li2O2 was prepared by a hydrometallurgical reaction between LiOH·H2O and H2O2. The overall reaction during annealing was found to involve the following three steps: (1) dehydration of LiOH·H2O, (2) decomposition of Li2O2, and (3) pyrolysis of the remaining anhydrous LiOH. This stepwise reaction was elucidated by thermal gravimetric and quantitative X-ray diffraction analyses. Furthermore, over-lithiated lithium nickel oxide (Li2NiO2) using our lithium precursor was synthesized, which exhibited a larger yield of 90.9% and higher irreversible capacity of 261 to 265 mAh g−1 than the sample prepared by commercially purchased Li2O (45.6% and 177 to 185 mAh g−1, respectively) due to optimal powder preparation conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Next Generation Electrode Material)
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