Special Issue "Geochronology, Crystallography and Phase Transition in Shocked Minerals"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Geochemistry and Geochronology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Elizaveta Kovaleva
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geology, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Interests: metamorphic petrology and deformation in shear zones; tectonic deformation and shock deformation effects in accessory minerals; formation and evolution of shock-generated melts and other impactites
Dr. Matthew Huber
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geology, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Interests: planetary science, particularly pertaining to shock deformation and geochemistry relating to hypervelocity impact structures
Dr. Martin Clark
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geology, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Interests: structural geology, remote sensing, and spatial analysis of impact deformed and post-impact deformed rocks

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, geoscientists have significantly improved their understanding of planetary processes relating to the evolution of the Earth, Moon, Mars, and other rocky bodies in our Solar System. These breakthroughs became possible, in part, due to developments in high-resolution analytical techniques, such as electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS and nanoSIMS), sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), micro-CT scanning, X-ray diffraction (XRF) analyses, etc. These techniques allow petrological, geochronological, geochemical, and microstructural investigations of mineral phases from meteorites, impactites, and samples returned from planetary bodies, and in combination with numerical modeling and (micro)structural studies, they allow for the history of the solar system and its rocky objects to be untangled. This Special Issue will include studies of impactites and planetary materials with a focus on geochemistry, geochronology, and phase transitions of rock-forming and accessory mineral phases. Such contributions should shed light on planetary tectonics and especially hypervelocity impact events.

We cordially invite you to express your interest and to submit contributions to this Special Issue.

Dr. Elizaveta Kovaleva
Dr. Matthew Huber
Dr. Martin Clark
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • impact processes
  • geochronology and cosmochronology
  • phase transitions
  • shock deformation
  • equation of state
  • structural geology
  • microstructures
  • planetary processes
  • meteorites
  • micrometeorites

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Textural Identification of Polycrystalline Magmatic, Tectonically-Deformed, and Shock-Related Zircon Aggregates
Minerals 2020, 10(5), 469; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10050469 - 21 May 2020
Abstract
Zircon with polycrystalline or polygranular appearance is either produced in the magmatic environment through crystallization, or due to deformation in metamorphic settings (including regional metamorphism and ductile shear zones), or as a result of shock-induced recrystallization. All three types can be easily confused [...] Read more.
Zircon with polycrystalline or polygranular appearance is either produced in the magmatic environment through crystallization, or due to deformation in metamorphic settings (including regional metamorphism and ductile shear zones), or as a result of shock-induced recrystallization. All three types can be easily confused and potentially lead to incorrect interpretations, especially if the crystallographic orientation analyses of zircon are not conducted. It is particularly important to establish the difference between tectonically-deformed polygranular zircon and shock-induced polygranular zircon because the latter serves as an indicator of shock event and is often used for dating asteroid impacts. In this paper, a series of polycrystalline zircon grains from ductile shear zones and metamorphic rocks are analyzed using a combination of techniques (BSE, CL, orientation contrast, EBSD, and microprobe mapping), and their properties are compared to reported polycrystalline zircons from magmatic and impact settings. This work shows how appearance, crystallographic orientation, and CL signature of “granules” differ between the different types of deformed zircon. Full article
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