Special Issue "Gut Microbiota: Its Role in Diabetes and Obesity"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Gut Microbiota".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Elena Barengolts
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Section of Endocrinology (Chief), Department of Medicine, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, and Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois At Chicago (Professor of Medicine), IL, USA
Interests: Type 2 diabetes; obesity; gut microbiota; effects of probiotics and prebiotics; drug interaction; all-cause mortality; nutrition; artificial intelligence in medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

"I believe that thirty million of these animalcules together would not take up as much room, or be as big, as a coarse grain of sand." Antonie van Leeuwenhoek ("the Father of Microbiology", 1632–1723)

"I don’t have a solution, but I do admire the problem." (www.smart-words.org)

With these quotations, I hope to inspire your contribution to this Special Issue, which is entitled "Gut Microbiota: Its Role in Diabetes and Obesity". We call for manuscripts appraising current and emerging understanding of this topic. The manuscripts may comprise preclinical (basic and translational) and clinical original research, reviews and meta-analyses, opinion, and comments (including personal experience). We invite all researchers, e.g., microbiologists, molecular biologists, ecologists, immunologists, physiologists, medical doctors, and artificial intelligence investigators, to contribute to this topic. If you are doing state-of the-art research that involves any aspect of gut microbiota and in your opinion is related to diabetes and/or obesity, you may contribute to this Special Issue.

We all admire the topic, so let us contribute to its solution.

Please submit directly via MDPI Microorganisms, stating in your cover letter that you are submitting to this Special Issue, or email your pre-submission queries if you are not sure about the suitability of your work.

Prof. Dr. Elena Barengolts
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • diabetes type 2
  • obesity
  • prediabetes
  • glucose intolerance
  • insulin resistance
  • gut microbiota AND drug interaction
  • metabolites
  • biomarkers
  • trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)
  • fatty acids
  • lipopolysaccharide
  • precision medicine
  • all-cause mortality

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Profiling the Oral Microbiome and Plasma Biochemistry of Obese Hyperglycemic Subjects in Qatar
Microorganisms 2019, 7(12), 645; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7120645 - 03 Dec 2019
Abstract
The present study is designed to compare demographic characteristics, plasma biochemistry, and the oral microbiome in obese (N = 37) and lean control (N = 36) subjects enrolled at Qatar Biobank, Qatar. Plasma hormones, enzymes, and lipid profiles were analyzed at [...] Read more.
The present study is designed to compare demographic characteristics, plasma biochemistry, and the oral microbiome in obese (N = 37) and lean control (N = 36) subjects enrolled at Qatar Biobank, Qatar. Plasma hormones, enzymes, and lipid profiles were analyzed at Hamad Medical Cooperation Diagnostic Laboratory. Saliva microbiome characterization was carried out by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing using Illumina MiSeq platform. Obese subjects had higher testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations compared to the control group. A negative association between BMI and testosterone (P < 0.001, r = −0.64) and SHBG (P < 0.001, r = −0.34) was observed. Irrespective of the study groups, the oral microbiome was predominantly occupied by Streptococcus, Prevotella, and Veillonella species. A generalized linear model revealed that the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio (2.25 ± 1.83 vs. 1.76 ± 0.58; corrected P-value = 0.04) was higher, and phylum Fusobacteria concentration (4.5 ± 3.0 vs. 6.2 ± 4.3; corrected P-value = 0.05) was low in the obese group compared with the control group. However, no differences in microbiome diversity were observed between the two groups as evaluated by alpha (Kruskal–Wallis P ≥ 0.78) and beta (PERMANOVA P = 0.37) diversity indexes. Certain bacterial phyla (Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes) were positively associated (P = 0.05, r ≤ +0.5) with estradiol, fast food consumption, creatinine, breastfed during infancy, triglycerides, and thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations. In conclusion, no differences in oral microbiome diversity were observed between the studied groups. However, the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio, a recognized obesogenic microbiome trait, was higher in the obese subjects. Further studies are warranted to confirm these findings in a larger cohort. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Microbiota: Its Role in Diabetes and Obesity)
Open AccessArticle
Predictors of Obesity among Gut Microbiota Biomarkers in African American Men with and without Diabetes
Microorganisms 2019, 7(9), 320; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7090320 - 05 Sep 2019
Abstract
Gut microbiota and their biomarkers may be associated with obesity. This study evaluated associations of body mass index (BMI) with circulating microbiota biomarkers in African American men (AAM) (n = 75). The main outcomes included fecal microbial community structure (16S rRNA), gut [...] Read more.
Gut microbiota and their biomarkers may be associated with obesity. This study evaluated associations of body mass index (BMI) with circulating microbiota biomarkers in African American men (AAM) (n = 75). The main outcomes included fecal microbial community structure (16S rRNA), gut permeability biomarkers (ELISA), and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, metabolome analysis). These outcomes were compared between obese and non-obese men, after adjusting for age. The results showed that lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), the ratio of LBP to CD14 (LBP/CD14), and SCFAs (propionic, butyric, isovaleric) were higher in obese (n = 41, age 58 years, BMI 36 kg/m2) versus non-obese (n = 34, age 55 years, BMI 26 kg/m2) men. BMI correlated positively with LBP, LBP/CD14 (p < 0.05 for both) and SCFAs (propionic, butyric, isovaleric, p < 0.01 for all). In the regression analysis, LBP, LBP/CD14, propionic and butyric acids were independent determinants of BMI. The study showed for the first time that selected microbiota biomarkers (LBP, LBP/CD14, propionic and butyric acids) together with several other relevant risks explained 39%–47% of BMI variability, emphasizing that factors other than microbiota-related biomarkers could be important. Further research is needed to provide clinical and mechanistic insight into microbiota biomarkers and their utility for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Microbiota: Its Role in Diabetes and Obesity)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Gut Microbiome Modulation Based on Probiotic Application for Anti-Obesity: A Review on Efficacy and Validation
Microorganisms 2019, 7(10), 456; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7100456 - 16 Oct 2019
Abstract
The growing prevalence of obesity has become an important problem worldwide as obesity has several health risks. Notably, factors such as excessive food consumption, a sedentary way of life, high sugar consumption, a fat-rich diet, and a certain genetic profile may lead to [...] Read more.
The growing prevalence of obesity has become an important problem worldwide as obesity has several health risks. Notably, factors such as excessive food consumption, a sedentary way of life, high sugar consumption, a fat-rich diet, and a certain genetic profile may lead to obesity. The present review brings together recent advances regarding the significance of interventions involving intestinal gut bacteria and host metabolic phenotypes. We assess important biological molecular mechanisms underlying the impact of gut microbiota on hosts including bile salt metabolism, short-chain fatty acids, and metabolic endotoxemia. Some previous studies have shown a link between microbiota and obesity, and associated disease reports have been documented. Thus, this review focuses on obesity and gut microbiota interactions and further develops the mechanism of the gut microbiome approach related to human obesity. Specifically, we highlight several alternative diet treatments including dietary changes and supplementation with probiotics. The future direction or comparative significance of fecal transplantation, synbiotics, and metabolomics as an approach to the modulation of intestinal microbes is also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Microbiota: Its Role in Diabetes and Obesity)
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