The Metabolism of Lactobacilli: Molecular Mechanisms and Applications

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Microbiology and Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2024 | Viewed by 3309

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, Fukushima University, Kanayagawa, Fukushima City 960-1296, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan
Interests: food microbiology; livestock utilization; applied microbiology

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Guest Editor
Department of Life and Food Sciences, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, 2-11 Inada-cho, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555, Japan
Interests: milk; lactic acid bacteria; functional ingredients

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Guest Editor
Graduate School of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan
Interests: lactic acid bacteria; applied microbiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a Special Issue of Microorganisms on "The Metabolism of Lactobacilli: Molecular Mechanisms and Applications." This Special Issue will cover a range of topics related to the metabolism of lactobacilli, including the molecular mechanisms underlying their metabolic pathways, the impact of environmental factors on their metabolism, and the potential applications of lactobacilli in various fields.

This Special Issue will provide a comprehensive overview of the latest research on the metabolism of lactic acid bacteria, highlighting recent advances in our understanding of their molecular mechanisms and exploring the different applications. Submissions may cover a wide range of areas including (but not limited to) the metabolism of lactic acid bacteria in food and beverage production, the use of lactic acid bacteria in probiotic and gut health, lactic acid bacteria in livestock compost, and the potential of lactic acid bacteria to produce bioactive compounds with therapeutic effects.

All submissions will be subject to a rigorous peer-review process. We hope this Special Issue will advance our knowledge of lactobacilli and their metabolic pathways and inspire new research directions and applications for these valuable microorganisms.

Dr. Junko Nishimura
Dr. Kenji Fukuda
Dr. Yasushi Kawai
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lactobacilli
  • metabolites
  • postbiotics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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10 pages, 246 KiB  
Article
A Novel Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum Strain with Pleiotropic Effects
by Merle Rätsep, Kalle Kilk, Mihkel Zilmer, Liina Kuus and Epp Songisepp
Microorganisms 2024, 12(1), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms12010174 - 15 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Postbiotics are gaining increasing interest among the scientific community as well as at the level of food processing enterprises. The aim of this preliminary study was to characterise the metabolic diversity of a novel Bifidobacterium longum strain, BIOCC 1719, of human origin. The [...] Read more.
Postbiotics are gaining increasing interest among the scientific community as well as at the level of food processing enterprises. The aim of this preliminary study was to characterise the metabolic diversity of a novel Bifidobacterium longum strain, BIOCC 1719, of human origin. The change after 24 h cultivation in three media was assessed using a metabolomic approach. Milk-based substrates favoured the activity of the strain, promoting the production of B vitamins, essential amino acids, bile acids, and fatty acids. Vitamins B1, B2, B6, B7, and B12 (with an average increase of 20–30%) were produced in both whole milk and whey; the increased production in the latter was as high as 100% for B7 and 744% for B12. The essential amino acids methionine and threonine were produced (>38%) in both milk and whey, and there was an increased production of leucine (>50%) in milk and lysine (126%) in whey. Increases in the content of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) by 20%, deoxycholic acid in milk and whey (141% and 122%, respectively), and cholic acid (52%) in milk were recorded. During the preliminary characterisation of the metabolic diversity of the novel B. longum strain, BIOCC 1719, we identified the bioactive compounds produced by the strain during fermentation. This suggests its potential use as a postbiotic ingredient to enrich the human diet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Metabolism of Lactobacilli: Molecular Mechanisms and Applications)
18 pages, 1710 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum I-Enriched Diet on the Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Capacity of Queen Scallop (Aequipecten opercularis Linnaeus, 1758) Extracts
by Ines Kovačić, Petra Burić, Ante Žunec, Josipa Bilić, Anamarija Prgić, Iva Čanak, Neven Iveša, Mauro Štifanić and Jadranka Frece
Microorganisms 2023, 11(11), 2723; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11112723 - 07 Nov 2023
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Abstract
The use of probiotics in the diet of bivalves poses a great potential in aquaculture as an alternative to antibiotics. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum I on the phenolic content and antioxidant capacity (AC) of [...] Read more.
The use of probiotics in the diet of bivalves poses a great potential in aquaculture as an alternative to antibiotics. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum I on the phenolic content and antioxidant capacity (AC) of queen scallop extracts after one month of feeding. Total phenols (TP) ranged from 28.17 ± 3.11 to 58.58 ± 8.57 mg GAE/100 g, total non-flavonoids (TNF) from 23.33 ± 3.66 to 36.56 ± 9.91 mg GAE/100 g, and total flavonoids (TF) from 10.56 ± 5.57 to 30.16 ± 1.69 mg CE/100 g. AC was assessed via three different methods: the ferric-reducing ability of plasma assay (FRAP), 2,2′-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic) acid assay (ABTS), and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl assay (DPPH). FRAP values ranged from 0.13 ± 0.03 to 0.17 ± 0.02 µM AA/g, ABTS from 0.68 ± 0.11 to 2.79 ± 0.34 µM AA/g, and DPPH from 1.75 ± 0.17 to 2.98 ± 0.53 µM AA/g. Among all extracts, the best phenolic content and AC were observed in water extracts from queen scallops. The bivalves treated with the Lactiplantibacillus plantarum I-enriched diet showed higher AC according to the FRAP assay in all extracts. A significant correlation was observed between AC and TP and TNF in control and Lactiplantibacillus plantarum I-treated scallops. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Metabolism of Lactobacilli: Molecular Mechanisms and Applications)
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15 pages, 1157 KiB  
Systematic Review
Lactobacilli in COVID-19: A Systematic Review Based on Next-Generation Sequencing Studies
by Clarissa Reginato Taufer and Pabulo Henrique Rampelotto
Microorganisms 2024, 12(2), 284; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms12020284 - 29 Jan 2024
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Abstract
The global pandemic was caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, known as COVID-19, which primarily affects the respiratory and intestinal systems and impacts the microbial communities of patients. This systematic review involved a comprehensive search across the major literature databases to explore the relationship [...] Read more.
The global pandemic was caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, known as COVID-19, which primarily affects the respiratory and intestinal systems and impacts the microbial communities of patients. This systematic review involved a comprehensive search across the major literature databases to explore the relationship between lactobacilli and COVID-19. Our emphasis was on investigations employing NGS technologies to explore this connection. Our analysis of nine selected studies revealed that lactobacilli have a reduced abundance in the disease and an association with disease severity. The protective mechanisms of lactobacilli in COVID-19 and other viral infections are likely to be multifaceted, involving complex interactions between the microbiota, the host immune system, and the virus itself. Moreover, upon closely examining the NGS methodologies and associated statistical analyses in each research study, we have noted concerns regarding the approach used to delineate the varying abundance of lactobacilli, which involves potential biases and the exclusion of pertinent data elements. These findings provide new insight into the relationship between COVID-19 and lactobacilli, highlighting the potential for microbiota modulation in COVID-19 treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Metabolism of Lactobacilli: Molecular Mechanisms and Applications)
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