Biofilm: Formation, Control, and Applications

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Biofilm".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 271

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, Tagliatela College of Engineering, University of New Haven, West Haven, CT 06516, USA
Interests: biofilm formation; material properties; cell-to-cell interactions; prevention; environmental and medical challenges

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bacterial biofilms are aggregates of single or multiple species of bacteria formed at various interfaces, such as solid–liquid, liquid–air, or liquid–liquid interfaces. Beneficial biofilms have played important roles in bioremediation, fermentation, nuclear waste cleanup, and manufacturing. However biofilms can also be detrimental by causing infections, biofouling, and biocorrosion. Understanding how biofilms are formed is critical to efficiently prevent and remove detrimental biofilms and optimally engineer biofilms with beneficial attributes. Recently, the material properties (e.g., viscosity and elasticity) of biofilms are attracting extensive attention due to their roles in controlling the activities of embedded cells (e.g., metabolic activities and cell-to-cell interactions) and the responses of biofilms to external perturbations (e.g., biofilm disruption). This Special Issue welcomes research on bacterial biofilms to better understand the molecular mechanisms of biofilm formation for biofilm control.

Dr. Huan Gu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • biofilm formation
  • material properties
  • cell-to-cell interactions
  • prevention
  • removal
  • control

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 4125 KiB  
Article
A Single Base Change in the csgD Promoter Resulted in Enhanced Biofilm in Swine-Derived Salmonella Typhimurium
by Zhe Li, Mengke Zhang, Gaopeng Lei, Xin Lu, Xiaorong Yang and Biao Kan
Microorganisms 2024, 12(7), 1258; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms12071258 - 21 Jun 2024
Viewed by 159
Abstract
Pathogenic Salmonella strains causing gastroenteritis typically can colonize and proliferate in the intestines of multiple host species. They retain the ability to form red dry and rough (rdar) biofilms, as seen in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Conversely, Salmonella serovar like Typhi, [...] Read more.
Pathogenic Salmonella strains causing gastroenteritis typically can colonize and proliferate in the intestines of multiple host species. They retain the ability to form red dry and rough (rdar) biofilms, as seen in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Conversely, Salmonella serovar like Typhi, which can cause systemic infections and exhibit host restriction, are rdar-negative. In this study, duck-derived strains and swine-derived strains of S. Typhimurium locate on independent phylogenetic clades and display relative genomic specificity. The duck isolates appear more closely related to human blood isolates and invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS), whereas the swine isolates were more distinct. Phenotypically, compared to duck isolates, swine isolates exhibited enhanced biofilm formation that was unaffected by the temperature. The transcriptomic analysis revealed the upregulation of csgDEFG transcription as the direct cause. This upregulation may be mainly attributed to the enhanced promoter activity caused by the G-to-T substitution at position −44 of the csgD promoter. Swine isolates have created biofilm polymorphisms by altering a conserved base present in Salmonella Typhi, iNTS, and most Salmonella Typhimurium (such as duck isolates). This provides a genomic characteristics perspective for understanding Salmonella transmission cycles and evolution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biofilm: Formation, Control, and Applications)
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