Special Issue "Urinary Metabolomic Profiling Analysis and Evaluation"

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Metabolomic Profiling Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 May 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Minoru Miyazato
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Systems Physiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan
Interests: voiding; neurourology; urinary sensing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Improving lifestyle habits is central to preventing lifestyle-related diseases (i.e., metabolic syndrome); however, implementing behavioral changes is challenging. Voiding is the most basic human behavior for maintaining homeostasis, and it can be altered by changes in physical activity, such as body weight, blood pressure, among others. Voiding itself is also a social activity seen in urinary scent marking in male rodents. We have recently reported that voiding problems, such as nocturia, are related to metabolic syndrome and are improved in the early phase of metabolic syndrome onset or improvement. Urine pH, electrolytes (e.g., sodium), and metabolites may be surrogate markers of metabolic syndrome or the related lower urinary tract symptoms, such as overactive bladder. If we can use this urinary metabolomic profiling analysis for personalized care of individuals, we can monitor urine by home-based IoT devices (e.g., smartphone) with feedback advice. In this specific issue, voiding itself or urinary sensing materials related to metabolic syndrome or its related overactive bladder are encouraged for publication.

Prof. Dr. Minoru Miyazato
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • voiding
  • nocturia
  • metabolic syndrome
  • obesity
  • urine ph
  • urine electrolytes
  • urine sensing
  • social communication
  • behavior change
  • congnition

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis of Urine as Diagnostic Tool for Organic Acidemias and Aminoacidopathies
Metabolites 2021, 11(12), 891; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11120891 - 20 Dec 2021
Viewed by 475
Abstract
The utility of low-resolution 1H-NMR analysis for the identification of biomarkers provided evidence for rapid biochemical diagnoses of organic acidemia and aminoacidopathy. 1H-NMR, with a sensitivity expected for a field strength of 400 MHz at 64 scans was used to establish [...] Read more.
The utility of low-resolution 1H-NMR analysis for the identification of biomarkers provided evidence for rapid biochemical diagnoses of organic acidemia and aminoacidopathy. 1H-NMR, with a sensitivity expected for a field strength of 400 MHz at 64 scans was used to establish the metabolomic urine sample profiles of an infant population diagnosed with small molecule Inborn Errors of Metabolism (smIEM) compared to unaffected individuals. A qualitative differentiation of the 1H-NMR spectral profiles of urine samples obtained from individuals affected by different organic acidemias and aminoacidopathies was achieved in combination with GC–MS. The smIEM disorders investigated in this study included phenylalanine metabolism; isovaleric, propionic, 3-methylglutaconicm and glutaric type I acidemia; and deficiencies in medium chain acyl-coenzyme and holocarboxylase synthase. The observed metabolites were comparable and similar to those reported in the literature, as well as to those detected with higher-resolution NMR. In this study, diagnostic marker metabolites were identified for the smIEM disorders. In some cases, changes in metabolite profiles differentiated post-treatments and follow-ups while allowing for the establishment of different clinical states of a biochemical disorder. In addition, for the first time, a 1H-NMR-based biomarker profile was established for holocarboxylase synthase deficiency spectrum. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urinary Metabolomic Profiling Analysis and Evaluation)
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Article
l-Theanine Protects Bladder Function by Suppressing Chronic Sympathetic Hyperactivity in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat
Metabolites 2021, 11(11), 778; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11110778 - 14 Nov 2021
Viewed by 881
Abstract
Chronic sympathetic hyperactivity is known to affect metabolism and cause various organ damage including bladder dysfunction. In this study, we evaluated whether l-theanine, a major amino acid found in green tea, ameliorates bladder dysfunction induced by chronic sympathetic hyperactivity as a dietary [...] Read more.
Chronic sympathetic hyperactivity is known to affect metabolism and cause various organ damage including bladder dysfunction. In this study, we evaluated whether l-theanine, a major amino acid found in green tea, ameliorates bladder dysfunction induced by chronic sympathetic hyperactivity as a dietary component for daily consumption. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), as an animal model of bladder dysfunction, were divided into SHR–water and SHR–theanine groups. After 6 weeks of oral administration, the sympathetic nervous system, bladder function, and oxidative stress of bladder tissue were evaluated. The mean blood pressure, serum noradrenaline level, and media-to-lumen ratio of small arteries in the suburothelium were significantly lower in the SHR–theanine than in the SHR–water group. Micturition interval was significantly longer, and bladder capacity was significantly higher in the SHR–theanine than in the SHR–water group. Bladder strip contractility was also higher in the SHR–theanine than in the SHR–water group. Western blotting of bladder showed that expression of malondialdehyde was significantly lower in the SHR–theanine than in the SHR–water group. These results suggested that orally administered l-theanine may contribute at least partly to the prevention of bladder dysfunctions by inhibiting chronic sympathetic hyperactivity and protecting bladder contractility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urinary Metabolomic Profiling Analysis and Evaluation)
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