Special Issue "Metabolite Markers of Phytochemicals"

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Chi Chen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Section Editor, Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA
Interests: metabolomics; nutrient metabolism; xenobiotic metabolism; nutritional biochemistry; animal nutrition; pharmacometabolomics; lipidomics; microbial metabolism
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Phytochemicals are important natural components of human diet and animal feed. Bioactive phytochemicals are commonly used as dietary supplements, food and feed additives, and even as pharmacological agents. Benefits and adverse effects of bioactive phytochemicals are closely associated with the bidirectional interactions between phytochemicals and the metabolic system, such as the disposition of phytochemicals, the regulation of nutrient, antioxidant, and microbial metabolism, and overdose-induced toxicities. Therefore, any metabolites that respond sensitively to phytochemical exposure and treatments are potential metabolite markers of phytochemicals, such as the biotransformation products of phytochemicals and the members of a specific metabolic pathway. This Special Issue aims to examine these metabolite markers of phytochemicals as well as underlying mechanisms, the significances, and the applications of these metabolite markers. The coverage of this Special Issue includes, but is not limited to, the following topics:

  • Exposure markers and metabolic routes of phytochemicals
  • Metabolic effects on phytochemicals on the digestion, absorption, distribution and metabolism of nutrients and antioxidants
  • Influences of phytochemicals on microflora and microbial metabolism
  • Metabolites associated with the toxicity of phytochemicals
  • Metabolic interactions between phytochemicals and pharmacological agents
Dr. Chi Chen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metabolite markers
  • metabolomics
  • phytochemical
  • nutrient metabolism
  • microbial metabolism
  • xenobiotic metabolism

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Inhibitory Effects of Green Tea Polyphenols on Microbial Metabolism of Aromatic Amino Acids in Humans Revealed by Metabolomic Analysis
Metabolites 2019, 9(5), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9050096 - 11 May 2019
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2365
Abstract
The bioactivities and potential health benefits of green tea polyphenols (GTP) have been extensively investigated, but the metabolic impact of chronic GTP intake on humans is not well defined. In this study, fecal and urine samples from postmenopausal female subjects taking a GTP [...] Read more.
The bioactivities and potential health benefits of green tea polyphenols (GTP) have been extensively investigated, but the metabolic impact of chronic GTP intake on humans is not well defined. In this study, fecal and urine samples from postmenopausal female subjects taking a GTP supplement or placebo for 12 months were compared by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomic analysis. The GTP-derived and GTP-responsive metabolites were identified and characterized by structural elucidation and quantitative analysis of the metabolites contributing to the separation of control and treatment samples in the multivariate models. Major GTP and their direct sulfate and glucuronide metabolites were absent in feces and urine. In contrast, GTP-derived phenyl-γ-valerlactone and phenylvaleric acid metabolites were identified as the most abundant GTP-derived metabolites in feces and urine, suggesting extensive microbial biotransformation of GTP in humans. Interestingly, GTP decreased the levels of microbial metabolites of aromatic amino acids (AAA), including indoxyl sulfate, phenylacetylglutamine, and hippuric acid, in urine. However, it did not affect the levels of AAA, as well as other microbial metabolites, including short-chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids, in feces. 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that the fecal microbiome was not significantly affected by chronic consumption of GTP. Overall, microbial metabolism is responsible for the formation of GTP metabolites while GTP metabolism may inhibit the formation of AAA metabolites from microbial metabolism. Because these GTP-derived and GTP-responsive metabolites have diverse bioactivities, microbial metabolism of GTP and AAA may play important roles in the beneficial health effects of green tea consumption in humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolite Markers of Phytochemicals)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Compositional Differences and Similarities between Typical Chinese Baijiu and Western Liquor as Revealed by Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics
Metabolites 2019, 9(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9010002 - 21 Dec 2018
Cited by 31 | Viewed by 2569
Abstract
Distilled liquors are important products, both culturally and economically. Chemically, as a complex mixture, distilled liquor comprises various chemical compounds in addition to ethanol. However, the chemical components of distilled liquors are still insufficiently understood and compositional differences and similarities of distilled liquors [...] Read more.
Distilled liquors are important products, both culturally and economically. Chemically, as a complex mixture, distilled liquor comprises various chemical compounds in addition to ethanol. However, the chemical components of distilled liquors are still insufficiently understood and compositional differences and similarities of distilled liquors from different cultures have never been compared. For the first time, both volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and non-VOCs in distilled liquors were profiled using mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approaches. A total of 879 VOCs and 268 non-VOCs were detected in 24 distilled liquors including six typical Chinese baijiu and 18 typical Western liquors. Principal component analysis and a correlation network revealed important insights into the compositional differences and similarities of the distilled liquors that were assessed. Ethyl esters, a few benzene derivatives, and alcohols were shared by most distilled liquors assessed, suggesting their important contribution to the common flavor and mouthfeel of distilled liquors. Sugars and esters formed by fatty alcohol differ significantly between the assessed Chinese baijiu and Western liquors, and are potential marker compounds that could be used for their discrimination. Factors contributing to the differences in chemical composition are proposed. Our results improve our understanding of the chemical components of distilled liquors, which may contribute to more rigorous quality control of alcoholic beverages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolite Markers of Phytochemicals)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop