Special Issue "Nutritional Metabolomics"

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Georgios Theodoridis
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Chief Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124, Greece
Interests: LC-MS; GC-MS; metabolomics; foodomics; bioanalysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Christina Virgiliou
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Co-Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124, Greece
Interests: metabolomics based method development; LC-HRMS; GC-MS; targeted metabolomics LC-MS/MS; foodomics; bioanalysis
Dr. Olga Deda
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Laboratory of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, School of Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Interests: LC-MS/MS; GC-MS and NMR metabolic profiling; biochemical interpretation of metabolomics data; designing and carrying out procedures on rodents

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutritional metabolomics, a rapidly emerging field, aims to promote the mechanistic understanding of the impact of diet on the human metabolome. Metabolomics-based studies in nutrition investigate metabolome perturbations induced by specific diets, foods, nutrients, microorganisms, and bioactive compounds using modern, advanced analytical techniques. Nutritional metabolomics could promote the transition from population-based nutritional sciences to personalized nutrition and facilitate the development of knowledge-based intervention approaches.

Regarding to your noticeable contribution to the area, I would like to invite you to submit either a new research or review paper related to nutritional metabolomics on health and disease based on volunteers/patients or animal models for a Special Issue of Metabolites entitled “Nutritional Metabolomics“.

Thank you for your time, considering this invitation.

Prof. Georgios Theodoridis
Dr. Christina Virgiliou
Dr. Olga Deda
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nutritional metabolomics
  • nutrients
  • diet
  • dietary compounds
  • food
  • metabolic profiling
  • nutritional intervention study
  • foodomics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Discovery of Urinary Biomarkers of Seaweed Intake Using Untargeted LC–MS Metabolomics in a Three-Way Cross-Over Human Study
Metabolites 2021, 11(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11010011 - 28 Dec 2020
Abstract
Seaweeds are a marine source rich in potentially bioactive components, and therefore have attracted attention since the middle of the twentieth century. Accurate and objective assessment of the intake of seaweeds to study their health effects is hampered by a lack of validated [...] Read more.
Seaweeds are a marine source rich in potentially bioactive components, and therefore have attracted attention since the middle of the twentieth century. Accurate and objective assessment of the intake of seaweeds to study their health effects is hampered by a lack of validated intake biomarkers. In this three-armed, randomized, cross-over study, an untargeted metabolomics approach was applied for discovering novel intake biomarkers. Twenty healthy participants (9 men and 11 women) were provided each of three test meals in a randomized order: 5 g of Laminaria digitate (LD), 5 g of Undaria pinnatifida (UP), or a control meal with energy-adjusted pea protein. Four urine samples and a 24 h pooled urine were collected along with blood samples at seven time-points. All samples were profiled by LC-ESI-QTOF-MS and the data were analyzed by univariate analysis and excretion kinetics to select putative intake biomarkers. In total, four intake biomarkers were selected from urine samples. They were identified as hydroxyl-dihydrocoumarin at Level III, loliolid glucuronide at level I, and isololiolid glucuronide at level II, while the last one remains unknown. Further identification and validation of these biomarkers by a cross-sectional study is essential to assess their specificity and robustness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Metabolomics)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparative Analysis of Milk Triglycerides Profile between Jaffarabadi Buffalo and Holstein Friesian Cow
Metabolites 2020, 10(12), 507; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10120507 - 11 Dec 2020
Abstract
Milk lipids are known for a variety of biological functions, however; little is known about compositional variation across breeds, especially for Jaffarabadi buffalo, an indigenous Indian breed. Systematic profiling of extracted milk lipids was performed by mass spectrometry across summer and winter in [...] Read more.
Milk lipids are known for a variety of biological functions, however; little is known about compositional variation across breeds, especially for Jaffarabadi buffalo, an indigenous Indian breed. Systematic profiling of extracted milk lipids was performed by mass spectrometry across summer and winter in Holstein Friesian cow and Jaffarabadi buffalo. Extensive MS/MS spectral analysis for the identification (ID) of probable lipid species using software followed by manual verification and grading of each assigned lipid species enabled ID based on (a) parent ion, (b) head group, and (c) partial/full acyl characteristic ions for comparative profiling of triacylglycerols between the breeds. Additionally, new triacylglycerol species with short-chain fatty acids were reported by manual interpretation of MS/MS spectra and comparison with curated repositories. Collectively, 1093 triacylglycerol species belonging to 141 unique sum compositions between the replicates of both the animal groups were identified. Relative quantitation at sum composition level followed by statistical analyses revealed changes in relative abundances of triacylglycerol species due to breed, season, and interaction effect of the two. Significant changes in triacylglycerols were observed between breeds (81%) and seasons (59%). When the interaction effect is statistically significant, a higher number of triacylglycerols species in Jaffarabadi has lesser seasonal variation than Holstein Friesian. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Metabolomics)
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Open AccessArticle
Blood Metabolomic Profiling Confirms and Identifies Biomarkers of Food Intake
Metabolites 2020, 10(11), 468; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10110468 - 17 Nov 2020
Abstract
Metabolomics can be a tool to identify dietary biomarkers. However, reported food-metabolite associations have been inconsistent, and there is a need to explore further associations. Our aims were to confirm previously reported food-metabolite associations and to identify novel food-metabolite associations. We conducted a [...] Read more.
Metabolomics can be a tool to identify dietary biomarkers. However, reported food-metabolite associations have been inconsistent, and there is a need to explore further associations. Our aims were to confirm previously reported food-metabolite associations and to identify novel food-metabolite associations. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of data from 849 participants (57% men) of the PopGen cohort. Dietary intake was obtained using FFQ and serum metabolites were profiled by an untargeted metabolomics approach. We conducted a systematic literature search to identify previously reported food-metabolite associations and analyzed these associations using linear regression. To identify potential novel food-metabolite associations, datasets were split into training and test datasets and linear regression models were fitted to the training datasets. Significant food-metabolite associations were evaluated in the test datasets. Models were adjusted for covariates. In the literature, we identified 82 food-metabolite associations. Of these, 44 associations were testable in our data and confirmed associations of coffee with 12 metabolites, of fish with five, of chocolate with two, of alcohol with four, and of butter, poultry and wine with one metabolite each. We did not identify novel food-metabolite associations; however, some associations were sex-specific. Potential use of some metabolites as biomarkers should consider sex differences in metabolism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Metabolomics)
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Open AccessArticle
Identification and Reproducibility of Plasma Metabolomic Biomarkers of Habitual Food Intake in a US Diet Validation Study
Metabolites 2020, 10(10), 382; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10100382 - 26 Sep 2020
Abstract
Previous metabolomic studies have identified putative blood biomarkers of dietary intake. These biomarkers need to be replicated in other populations and tested for reproducibility over time for the potential use in future epidemiological studies. We conducted a metabolomics analysis among 671 racially/ethnically diverse [...] Read more.
Previous metabolomic studies have identified putative blood biomarkers of dietary intake. These biomarkers need to be replicated in other populations and tested for reproducibility over time for the potential use in future epidemiological studies. We conducted a metabolomics analysis among 671 racially/ethnically diverse men and women included in a diet validation study to examine the correlation between >100 food groups/items (101 by a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), 105 by 24-h diet recalls (24HRs)) with 1141 metabolites measured in fasting plasma sample replicates, six months apart. Diet–metabolite associations were examined by Pearson’s partial correlation analysis. Biomarker reproducibility was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). A total of 677 diet–metabolite associations were identified after Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons and restricting absolute correlation coefficients to greater than 0.2 (601 associations using the FFQ and 395 using 24HRs). The median ICCs of the 238 putative biomarkers was 0.56 (interquartile range 0.46–0.68). In this study, with repeated FFQs, 24HRs and plasma metabolic profiles, we identified several potentially novel food biomarkers and replicated others found in our previous study. Our findings contribute to the growing literature on food-based biomarkers and provide important information on biomarker reproducibility which could facilitate their utilization in future nutritional epidemiological studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Metabolomics)
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