Special Issue "Recent Advances on Biosensor Nanotechnology Based on Lipid Membranes and Related Devices"

A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Dimitrios P. Nikolelis

Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
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Interests: analytical chemistry; chemical sensors; nanotechnology; biomembranes; lipid film based sensors; electrochemistry; nanomaterials; fluorometry differential scanning; food safety; calorimetry; scanning electron microscopy; IR and Raman spectroscopy; toxicants; toxins; pathogens; insecticides; pesticides; environmental monitoring and sciences; gas pollutants; atmospheric chemistry; doping materials; analysis of foods; analysis of fruits and vegetables; analysis of dairy products; water monitoring; artificial and natural receptors; biofuels; enzymes; antibodies; ion selective electrodes; kinetic method of analysis; flow injection analysis; optical methods of analysis; gastroenterology; chomatography; enzyme isolation; antibodies
Guest Editor
Dr. Georgia-Paraskevi Nikoleli

Laboratory of Inorganic & Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemical Sciences, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece
E-Mail
Interests: analytical chemistry; nanotechnology; chemical sensors; food analysis and safety; environmental monitoring; bioanalysis; biochemical processes; biomembranes; artificial and natural receptors; lipid film based sensors; insecticides; pesticides doping materials toxins; toxicants; pathogens; antibodies; enzymes; analysis of fruits and vegetables; analysis of dairy products; gas pollutants; atmospheric chemistry; differential scanning calorimetry; electroanalysis; IR and Raman spectroscopy; new materials; scanning electron microscopy; electron scanning microscopy; tem; technological sciences; physical sciences
Guest Editor
Dr. Christina Siontorou

Department of Industrial Management and Technology, University of Piraeus, 80 Karaoli and Dimitriou Str., 18534 Piraeus, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Interests: design and development of measuring devices for environmental, industrial and biomedical analyses: lab analyzers, field sensors, nanosensors, multi-arrays, biomonitoring networks; design of biotechnology products of industrial and biomedical interest and applicability, putting emphasis on the optimization of physicochemical parameters; protection of environmental systems: ecosystem modeling, air pollution, wastewater treatment, environmental quality assessment, environmental monitoring; knowledge management: ontology platforms, fault tree analysis, technology transfer, innovation, R&D

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnology is playing an increasingly-important role in the development of biosensors. The sensitivity and performance of biosensors is being improved by using nanomaterials for their construction. The use of these nanomaterials has allowed the introduction of many new signal transduction technologies in biosensors. Because of their submicron dimensions, nanosensors, nanoprobes, and other nanosystems have allowed simple and rapid analyses of food toxicants and environmental pollutants. Lipid membranes represent an appropriate biocompatible structure for the development of new types of biosensors with fast response (on the order of a few seconds) and high sensitivity nanomolar detection limits) that may be used in health diagnosis and in field applications for food analysis and environmental monitoring. Similar systems as lipid membranes using surface recognition (for example molecularly imprinted polymers, MIPs) offer similar advantages and a large number of this type of biosensors have been reported in the literature. Control over the positioning and orientation of molecules on a surface allows the fabrication of nanobiosensors with new functionalities and a broad range of applications. Self-assembled monolayers of noncovalently bound molecules ensured the relevant path to form areas with peculiar functions, which allow tuning precisely the physicochemical properties of the surface. It is extremely important for the device sensitivity that the recognizing elements have to improve surface density, stability, need to minimize some interactions with substances other than analyte. This type of materials can be designed using different molecular methods, i.e., Langmuir-Blodgett (LB)-type techniques, SAMs, as well as electrolytic deposition nanosensors based on lipid membranes, and related materials are cost efficient, easy-to-use and are good alternatives to expensive and time-consuming standard analytical methods (i.e., chromatography or mass spectroscopy).

We invite authors to contribute original research articles or comprehensive review articles covering the current state-of-the-art and the future trends in the design of biosensor nanotechnology based on lipid membranes and related devices. This Special Issue aims to cover a broad range of subjects, from device design and assembly to analytical development, implementation and commercialization prospects. The format of welcomed articles includes full papers, communications, and reviews.

Prof. Dr. Dimitros P. Nikolelis
Dr. Georgia-Paraskevi Nikoleli
Prof. Dr. Christina Siontorou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Membranes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanotechnology
  • biosensors
  • lipid membranes
  • surface recognition devices
  • rapid and remote detection of food toxicants and environmental pollutants

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Effects of Polymer Matrices and Carbon Nanotubes on the Generation of Electric Energy in a Microbial Fuel Cell
Received: 24 September 2018 / Revised: 12 October 2018 / Accepted: 22 October 2018 / Published: 25 October 2018
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Abstract
The anode of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was formed on a graphite electrode and immobilized Gluconobacter oxydans VKM-1280 bacterial cells. Immobilization was performed in chitosan, poly(vinyl alcohol) or N-vinylpyrrolidone-modified poly(vinyl alcohol). Ethanol was used as substrate. The anode was modified using [...] Read more.
The anode of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was formed on a graphite electrode and immobilized Gluconobacter oxydans VKM-1280 bacterial cells. Immobilization was performed in chitosan, poly(vinyl alcohol) or N-vinylpyrrolidone-modified poly(vinyl alcohol). Ethanol was used as substrate. The anode was modified using multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The aim of the modification was to create a conductive network between cell lipid membranes, containing exposed pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent alcoholdehydrogenases, and the electrode to facilitate electron transfer in the system. The bioelectrochemical characteristics of modified anodes at various cell/polymer ratios were assessed via current density, power density, polarization curves and impedance spectres. Microbial fuel cells based on chitosan at a matrix/cell volume ratio of 5:1 produced maximal power characteristics of the system (8.3 μW/cm2) at a minimal resistance (1111 Ohm cm2). Modification of the anode by multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) led to a slight decrease of internal resistance (down to 1078 Ohm cm2) and to an increase of generated power density up to 10.6 μW/cm2. We explored the possibility of accumulating electric energy from an MFC on a 6800-μF capacitor via a boost converter. Generated voltage was increased from 0.3 V up to 3.2 V. Accumulated energy was used to power a Clark-type biosensor and a Bluetooth transmitter with three sensors, a miniature electric motor and a light-emitting diode. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview The Application of Lipid Membranes in Biosensing
Membranes 2018, 8(4), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes8040108
Received: 8 October 2018 / Revised: 1 November 2018 / Accepted: 12 November 2018 / Published: 14 November 2018
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Abstract
The exploitation of lipid membranes in biosensors has provided the ability to reconstitute a considerable part of their functionality to detect trace of food toxicants and environmental pollutants. This paper reviews recent progress in biosensor technologies based on lipid membranes suitable for food [...] Read more.
The exploitation of lipid membranes in biosensors has provided the ability to reconstitute a considerable part of their functionality to detect trace of food toxicants and environmental pollutants. This paper reviews recent progress in biosensor technologies based on lipid membranes suitable for food quality monitoring and environmental applications. Numerous biosensing applications based on lipid membrane biosensors are presented, putting emphasis on novel systems, new sensing techniques, and nanotechnology-based transduction schemes. The range of analytes that can be currently using these lipid film devices that can be detected include, insecticides, pesticides, herbicides, metals, toxins, antibiotics, microorganisms, hormones, dioxins, etc. Technology limitations and future prospects are discussed, focused on the evaluation/validation and eventually commercialization of the proposed lipid membrane-based biosensors. Full article
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