Hollow Fiber Membranes for Gas and Vapor Separation: Fundamentals, State-of-the-Art, and Recent Advancements

A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 435

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute on Membrane Technology, CNR-ITM, Via P. Bucci 17/C, 87036 Rende (CS), Italy
Interests: preparation of dense and mixed-matrix polymeric membranes for the treatment of gaseous streams; preparation of flat polymer membranes and composite hollow fibers for gas separation; morphological–structural and chemical–physical characterization of polymeric membranes; study of gas transport properties in polymeric membranes; gas separation processes for the production of renewable energy and the sequestration and reuse of CO2; H2 production by means of membrane water electrolysis processes and the study of gas transport properties in ion-exchange membranes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Institute on Membrane Technology, CNR-ITM, Via P. Bucci 17/C, 87036 Rende (CS), Italy
Interests: polymeric and hybrid membranes for gas and vapour separation; membrane preparation by phase inversion techniques; principles of pure and mixed gas and vapour transport in membranes by sorption and permeation experiments; structural, mechanical, and thermal properties of polymers, polymer blends and hybrid materials; physical aging; polymers of intrinsic microporosity; perfluoropolymer membranes; ionic liquid membraness; carbon dioxide capture
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute on Membrane Technology, CNR-ITM, Via P. Bucci 17/C, 87036 Rende (CS), Italy
Interests: molecular dynamics and Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations of polymeric membranes and metal-organic frameworks; modelling of single gas and mixed gas separation; modelling of morphological and transport properties of polymeric membranes; preparation and characterization of mixed matrix membranes for gas separation

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Guest Editor
Institute on Membrane Technology, CNR-ITM, Via P. Bucci 17/C, 87036 Rende (CS), Italy
Interests: polymeric and mixed matrix membranes for gas and vapour separation; thin film composite membranes; pure and mixed gas transport phenomena; proton exhange membranes and anion exchange membranes; fuel cells and electrolyzers; industrial wastewater treatment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gas separation by means of hollow fibre membranes (HFMs) is becoming increasingly important for many industrial gas separation processes. HFMs play a key role in gas separation due to their compact modular design, relatively low energy consumption, high process efficiency, high packing density, and small footprint. The increased demand for gas separation processes requires the development of innovative and novel hollow fibre materials that can ensure long-term durability and good resistance under operating conditions, maximizing the efficiency of the separation processes. The efforts of research in this field must be focused on advanced HFM preparation methods, efficient module production, process design and construction, and advancing the understanding of membrane properties from atomic scales to the process level, with the aim to obtain successful practical solutions that are even suitable for large-scale industrial separation processes.

This Special Issue of Membranes aims to provide an overview of the state of the art and the challenges in the preparation, characterization, and modelling of advanced of HFMs. This Special Issue is proposed as a collection of articles that focus on HFM materials, their preparation, structure and morphology, properties, and performance from theoretical, experimental, and industrial points of view.

Dr. Elisa Esposito
Dr. Johannes Carolus (John) Jansen
Dr. Carmen Rizzuto
Dr. Mariagiulia Longo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Membranes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hollow fibre spinning, principles and progress
  • gas transport in hollow fiber membranes
  • membrane morphology, configuration and special features
  • membrane materials (advanced polymers, ionic liquids)
  • thin film composite membranes
  • mixed matrix membranes
  • catalytic membranes
  • gas and vapour transport phenomena
  • pure and mixed gases
  • thermal and mechanical properties, plasticization and physical aging
  • theory, modelling and simulations (quantum mechanics, molecular dynamics)
  • carbon capture and conversion
  • biogas upgrading and natural gas treatment
  • helium recovery, hydrogen separation
  • membrane processes and process simulation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 2356 KiB  
Article
Optimization of Membrane Condenser Process with PTFE Hollow Fiber Membrane
by Yue Zhou, Susu Long, Zhaohui Wang, Enrico Drioli, Feng Zhang and Zhaoliang Cui
Membranes 2024, 14(6), 141; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes14060141 - 14 Jun 2024
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Abstract
A membrane condenser (MC) is a novel membrane separation technology that utilizes the hydrophobic nature of porous membranes to capture water vapor from humid gas. Factors such as temperature, pressure, flow rate, and gas composition entering the membrane condenser play a crucial role [...] Read more.
A membrane condenser (MC) is a novel membrane separation technology that utilizes the hydrophobic nature of porous membranes to capture water vapor from humid gas. Factors such as temperature, pressure, flow rate, and gas composition entering the membrane condenser play a crucial role in water recovery efficiency. This study utilized hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) hollow fiber membranes to create multiple identical membrane modules. This research investigated the impact of temperature, flow rate, pressure on the intake side, gas flow on the cooling side, membrane area, and other variables on the performance of the membrane condenser process. This study compared water extraction efficiency under different conditions, focusing on feed flow temperature and sweeping flow. Results showed that at a temperature of 60 °C, the water recovery rate was 24.7%, while a sweep gas flow rate of 4 L/min resulted in a recovery rate of 22.7%. The efficiency of the membrane condenser decreased with higher feed flow rates but increased with larger membrane areas. A proportional relationship between inlet flow and membrane area was observed, suggesting an optimal range of 0.51–0.67 cm/s for both parameters. These findings offer valuable insights for the practical implementation of hydrophobic membrane-based membrane condenser technology. Full article
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