Special Issue "Sustainable Circular Bioeconomy Approaches for the Biotechnological Development of Marine-Derived Products"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Biotechnology Related to Drug Discovery or Production".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2023 | Viewed by 2861

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Susana P Gaudencio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UCIBIO – Applied Biomolecular Sciences Unit, Chemistry Department, Blue Biotechnology and Biomedicine Lab, Nova School of Science and Technology, Nova University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: marine natural products; structure elucidation; secondary metabolites; blue biotechnology; bioactive compounds from actinomycetes; drug discovery and biotechnological applications
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Ana Rotter
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Marine Biology Station Piran, National Institute of Biology, Piran, Slovenia
Interests: transcriptomics; real-time PCR; bioinformatics and computational biology; differential gene expression; microarray analysis; high throughput sequencing; expression analysis; pathway analysis; cancer genomics; biological databases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Cristiana A. V. Torres
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica, Portugal
Interests: optimization of fermentative processes; microbial production of biopolymers; biopolymers characterization; study of biopolymer properties in aqueous solutions; fine chemical biological production (e.g., aromatic compounds)
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oceans are a vast reservoir of underexplored biodiversity, which is capable of producing natural products and other biomolecules that can be used for human health, well-being, multiple biotechnological applications, and alleviating societal concerns. Despite the increasing discovery research efforts, the marketed products fall short. This Special Issue entitled “Sustainable circular bioeconomy approaches for the biotechnological development of marine-derived products" aims at highlighting original research articles and comprehensive reviews concerning processes and technologies to either: 1) mitigate marine emerging pollutants issues, or 2) use industrial wastes and by-products in marine environments for the biotechnological and industrial production of bioactive secondary metabolites and high-value bioproducts, using sustainable and circular bioeconomy methodologies.

We invite you to submit an investigation that covers but is not limited to the following topics:

  • Using waste as a target or a resource;
  • Screening, culturing and characterization of microorganisms with pollutant degrading potential;
  • Processes and technologies for the degradation of marine emerging pollutants using marine micro- and macroorganisms;
  • Discovery, development and sustainable production of marine secondary metabolites, biopolymers and other bioproducts for high-value applications (e.g., pharmaceutical, cosmetic, cosmeceutical, nutraceutical, animal feed, biofuels, bioplastics, biostimulants, etc.);
  • Genetics, bioinformatics, and/ or nano-biotechnologies to enhance the discovery and production of marine bioactive secondary metabolites, high-value biopolymers and other bioproducts;
  • Culture, fermentation, extraction processes, engineering and production technologies for the sustainable industrial development of marine bioactive secondary metabolites, high-value biopolymers and other bioproducts;
  • Microbial cell factories.

Dr. Susana P Gaudencio
Dr. Ana Rotter
Dr. Cristiana A. V. Torres
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Evaluation of Haloferax mediterranei Strain R4 Capabilities for Cadmium Removal from Brines
Mar. Drugs 2023, 21(2), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/md21020072 - 21 Jan 2023
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Abstract
Haloferax mediterranei has revealed a high bioremediation potential for several inorganic anions (e.g., nitrates and nitrites) and metals from hypersaline waters and brines. However, it is unclear, to date, whether this microorganism allows Cd (II) bioremediation. Consequently, the main objective of this work [...] Read more.
Haloferax mediterranei has revealed a high bioremediation potential for several inorganic anions (e.g., nitrates and nitrites) and metals from hypersaline waters and brines. However, it is unclear, to date, whether this microorganism allows Cd (II) bioremediation. Consequently, the main objective of this work was to assess the Cd (II) bioremediation potential of Hfx. mediterranei R4. To this end, Hfx. mediterranei cell growth rate and metal bioaccumulation were investigated using different culture media (complex, CM, and defined medium, DM) containing Cd (II) up to 1 mM. In addition, the elemental profile of the biomass (i.e., Al, Ba, Ca, Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Sr and Zn) has also been monitored to gain insight into the metabolic processes that may be taking place at the intracellular level for Cd (II) removal. Because of the formation of CdS precipitate, CM is not a suitable culture media for evaluating Cd bioremediation since metal concentration could not be appropriately controlled. When operating in DM, it was observed that the cell doubling time increases three times in the presence of Cd (II). Hfx. mediterranei can bioaccumulate Cd, showing the highest significant accumulation at concentrations of 0.4 mM (108 ± 12 mg Cd/g dry tissue). Finally, the presence of Cd (II) affects the content of K, Mg, Mn and Zn in the biomass, by increasing K levels up to 27 ± 18% and Mn up to 310 ± 140% and reducing Mg levels up to 55 ± 36% and Zn up to 30 ± 4%. These results suggest that different mechanisms are involved in Cd (II) tolerance by Hfx. mediterranei, resulting in increasing the cell concentration of stress-tolerant elements in the biomass (K and Mn), while lowering the concentration of elements which Cd (II) competes with (Mg and Zn), and that all affects the physiological response of the organism by decreasing its growth rate. Full article
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Article
Marine-Derived Actinomycetes: Biodegradation of Plastics and Formation of PHA Bioplastics—A Circular Bioeconomy Approach
Mar. Drugs 2022, 20(12), 760; https://doi.org/10.3390/md20120760 - 01 Dec 2022
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Abstract
Plastics are present in the majority of daily-use products worldwide. Due to society’s production and consumption patterns, plastics are accumulating in the environment, causing global pollution issues and intergenerational impacts. Our work aims to contribute to the development of solutions and sustainable methods [...] Read more.
Plastics are present in the majority of daily-use products worldwide. Due to society’s production and consumption patterns, plastics are accumulating in the environment, causing global pollution issues and intergenerational impacts. Our work aims to contribute to the development of solutions and sustainable methods to mitigate this pressing problem, focusing on the ability of marine-derived actinomycetes to accelerate plastics biodegradation and produce polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), which are biodegradable bioplastics. The thin plastic films’ biodegradation was monitored by weight loss, changes in the surface chemical structure (Infra-Red spectroscopy FTIR-ATR), and by mechanical properties (tensile strength tests). Thirty-six marine-derived actinomycete strains were screened for their plastic biodegradability potential. Among these, Streptomyces gougerotti, Micromonospora matsumotoense, and Nocardiopsis prasina revealed ability to degrade plastic films—low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polystyrene (PS) and polylactic acid (PLA) in varying conditions, namely upon the addition of yeast extract to the culture media and the use of UV pre-treated thin plastic films. Enhanced biodegradation by these bacteria was observed in both cases. S. gougerotti degraded 0.56% of LDPE films treated with UV radiation and 0.67% of PS films when inoculated with yeast extract. Additionally, N. prasina degraded 1.27% of PLA films when these were treated with UV radiation, and yeast extract was added to the culture medium. The main and most frequent differences observed in FTIR-ATR spectra during biodegradation occurred at 1740 cm−1, indicating the formation of carbonyl groups and an increase in the intensity of the bands, which indicates oxidation. Young Modulus decreased by 30% on average. In addition, S. gougerotti and M. matsumotoense, besides biodegrading conventional plastics (LDPE and PS), were also able to use these as a carbon source to produce degradable PHA bioplastics in a circular economy concept. Full article
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Article
Efficient Preparation of High-Purity Fucoxanthinol by SpyTag-Tailored Active Cholesterol Esterase Aggregates
Mar. Drugs 2022, 20(11), 709; https://doi.org/10.3390/md20110709 - 12 Nov 2022
Viewed by 482
Abstract
A novel approach to producing high-purity fucoxanthinol (FXOH) was exploited as a sustainable method to maximize fucoxanthin (FX) utilization. Through fusing the genes of cholesterol esterase and SpyTag and then expressing them in Escherichia coli, the fusion chimera was self-assembled into insoluble [...] Read more.
A novel approach to producing high-purity fucoxanthinol (FXOH) was exploited as a sustainable method to maximize fucoxanthin (FX) utilization. Through fusing the genes of cholesterol esterase and SpyTag and then expressing them in Escherichia coli, the fusion chimera was self-assembled into insoluble active aggregates by SpyTag, which could be regarded as carrier-free immobilization. The immobilization yield of the active cholesterol esterase aggregates could reach 60%. They have expressed good activity retention at 92.48% and 60.13% after 3 and 12 cycles, respectively, which is an exciting finding. The conversion ratio of FX to FXOH is 95.02%, which is remarkably higher than those realized via the conventional chemical reduction method (55.86%) and the enzymatic hydrolysis method by free cholesterol esterases (84.51%). The purity of FXOH obtained by this method is as high as 98%, which is much higher than those obtained by other methods. Thus, a promising method for simultaneously purifying and immobilizing active cholesterol esterase aggregates is demonstrated in this study by SpyTag tailoring. In addition, this study provides an eco-friendly method for producing high-purity FXOH from FX in a highly efficient manner. Full article
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Article
Comparison of Growth and Chemical Profile of Diatom Skeletonema grevillei in Bioreactor and Incubation-Shaking Cabinet in Two Growth Phases
Mar. Drugs 2022, 20(11), 697; https://doi.org/10.3390/md20110697 - 07 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 762
Abstract
Marine microalgae, diatoms, are considered a source of a wide range of high-value compounds, and numerous studies indicate their biotechnological potential in the food and feed industry, cosmetic industry, nanotechnology, pharmaceutical industry, biodiesel production, fertilizers, and wastewater treatment. The aim of this study [...] Read more.
Marine microalgae, diatoms, are considered a source of a wide range of high-value compounds, and numerous studies indicate their biotechnological potential in the food and feed industry, cosmetic industry, nanotechnology, pharmaceutical industry, biodiesel production, fertilizers, and wastewater treatment. The aim of this study was to compare the growth, chemical profiles, and antioxidant activity of the diatom Skeletonema grevillei cultivated in a bioreactor and an incubation-shaking cabinet at different growth phases (after 192 and 312 h). Growth was monitored by evaluating cell density with the Sedgewick Rafter chamber, and the collected biomass was extracted with 70% ethanol assisted by ultrasound. Extracts were evaporated to dryness and compounds were identified in derivatized form by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis, while antioxidant capacity was evaluated by DPPH and ORAC. Significantly faster growth was observed in the bioreactor than in the incubation-shaking cabinet. Oleamide, palmitelaidic acid, glycerol monostearate, myristic acid, cholesterol, eicosapentaenoic acid, 1-monopalmitin, and 24-methylene cholesterol were identified as the major compounds in both systems. Among them, oleamide was the dominant compound in both systems. It is also shown that prolonging the cultivation period had a direct effect on increasing the extract yield. The highest DPPH inhibition (11.4 ± 1%) and ORAC values (93.3 ± 8.4 mM TE) were obtained for the S. grevillei extract recovered from the bioreactor after 312 h. The obtained results contribute to the possibility of using S. grevillei for various biotechnological applications in the future. Full article
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