Special Issue "Landscape Controls of Insect Biodiversity in Agricultural Environments"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021) | Viewed by 2411

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jeffrey D. Holland
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Entomology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2089, USA
Interests: landscape ecology; biodiversity; entomology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The roles of insects in sustaining ecosystems through their ecosystem services and in supporting food webs are increasingly recognized. Recent growth in the recognition of the importance of pollinators is but one example of this. However, meeting the growing need for agricultural intensification to feed a growing population puts this biodiversity at risk. This Special Issue of Land will bring together leading research on insect biodiversity in agricultural landscapes to highlight the importance of biodiversity and how it may be preserved. Studies included will focus on landscape influences on insect functional diversity or ecosystem services. Research on landscape strategies for preserving insect biodiversity is also welcome. Studies should focus on a broad range of taxa or diversity within a taxonomic group. The spatial focus will vary between different taxonomic groups but should consider landscape to regional levels for the taxa under study.

Dr. Jeffrey D. Holland
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Functional diversity
  • Ecosystem services
  • Spatial scale
  • Landscape filtering
  • Insect community

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Review
Pollination in Agroecosystems: A Review of the Conceptual Framework with a View to Sound Monitoring
Land 2021, 10(5), 540; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10050540 - 19 May 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2079
Abstract
The pollination ecology in agroecosystems tackles a landscape in which plants and pollinators need to adjust, or be adjusted, to human intervention. A valid, widely applied approach is to regard pollination as a link between specific plants and their pollinators. However, recent evidence [...] Read more.
The pollination ecology in agroecosystems tackles a landscape in which plants and pollinators need to adjust, or be adjusted, to human intervention. A valid, widely applied approach is to regard pollination as a link between specific plants and their pollinators. However, recent evidence has added landscape features for a wider ecological perspective. Are we going in the right direction? Are existing methods providing pollinator monitoring tools suitable for understanding agroecosystems? In Italy, we needed to address these questions to respond to government pressure to implement pollinator monitoring in agroecosystems. We therefore surveyed the literature, grouped methods and findings, and evaluated approaches. We selected studies that may contain directions and tools directly linked to pollinators and agroecosystems. Our analysis revealed four main paths that must come together at some point: (i) the research question perspective, (ii) the advances of landscape analysis, (iii) the role of vegetation, and (iv) the gaps in our knowledge of pollinators taxonomy and behavior. An important conclusion is that the pollinator scale is alarmingly disregarded. Debate continues about what features to include in pollinator monitoring and the appropriate level of detail: we suggest that the pollinator scale should be the main driver. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop