Recent Advances in Psychopharmacology: From Bench to Bedside

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmacogenetics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 August 2024 | Viewed by 5688

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Spring Valley Hospital and Medical Center, Valley Health System, Las Vegas, NV 89118, USA
2. Department of Psychiatry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA
3. College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89014, USA
Interests: psychopharmacology; pharmacogenomics; functional and structural neuroimaging; cognition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Historically, the mid-1950s were the most revolutionary time in psychopharmacology, when the first effective psychotropic medications were discovered for major depressive disorder and schizophrenia. Over the last several decades, our focus remained on developing "me too" drugs, primarily involving monoamine systems. However, after realizing that there might be greener pastures beyond monoamines, the paradigm has now shifted from monoamine to glutamatergic and GABAergic mechanisms, the core excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems, respectively. Although it took us a long time, one of the most exciting and recent discoveries has been the rapid onset of antidepressant efficacy with ketamine, which blocks one of the ionotropic glutamate receptors, N-Methyl-D aspartate (NMDA), instead of modulating the monoamine system. Since ketamine is often labeled as a psychedelic, its approval opened up significant research with more classical psychedelics, such as psilocybin, which also appears to have relatively rapid onset of antidepressant effects. Another novel breakthrough was the discovery of an allosteric modulator of GABA-A receptors, brexanolone, the first medication approved to manage post-partum depression. A significant level of promising research is also occurring in schizophrenia, such as glycine transporter-1 (Glyt-1) inhibition, and transient amine-associated receptor-1 (TAAR-1) agonism, as the novel mechanisms to address negative and cognitive symptom domains that are not generally responsive to the dopamine and serotonin–dopamine antagonists. Furthermore, vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) inhibitors valbenazine and deutetrabenazine have also offered the first effective treatment for tardive dyskinesia in schizophrenia patients. Other novel molecules being investigated for various psychiatric disorders also look promising. Although pharmacogenomic research in psychiatry is not advanced enough to provide a genetic basis for screening and developing new molecules, it offers significant promise for future studies. Based on this background, we launched this Special Issue as a platform to publish studies from researchers employing various research methods and technologies to study psychopharmacological advances in psychiatry. We welcome original papers, reviews, or meta-analyses based on animal and human studies. We will consider papers reporting observational, clinical trials, genetics, imaging, computational, health service research, and ecological and in vitro data.

Dr. Mujeeb U. Shad
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • psychopharmacology
  • bench to bedside
  • personalized medicine
  • pharmacogenomics
  • pharmacogenetics
  • molecular targets
  • glutamate
  • GABA
  • psychedelics

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

16 pages, 327 KiB  
Review
Recent Developments in Pharmacotherapy of Depression: Bench to Bedside
by Mujeeb U. Shad
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(5), 773; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13050773 - 29 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2321
Abstract
For the last 70 years, we did not move beyond the monoamine hypothesis of depression until the approval of the S-enantiomer of ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocker and the first non-monoaminergic antidepressant characterized by rapid antidepressant and antisuicidal effects. A similar profile [...] Read more.
For the last 70 years, we did not move beyond the monoamine hypothesis of depression until the approval of the S-enantiomer of ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocker and the first non-monoaminergic antidepressant characterized by rapid antidepressant and antisuicidal effects. A similar profile has been reported with another NMDA receptor antagonist, dextromethorphan, which has also been approved to manage depression in combination with bupropion. More recently, the approval of a positive allosteric modulator of GABA-A receptors, brexanolone, has added to the list of recent breakthroughs with the relatively rapid onset of antidepressant efficacy. However, multiple factors have compromised the clinical utility of these exciting discoveries in the general population, including high drug acquisition costs, mandatory monitoring requirements, parenteral drug administration, lack of insurance coverage, indirect COVID-19 effects on healthcare systems, and training gaps in psychopharmacology. This narrative review aims to analyze the clinical pharmacology of recently approved antidepressants and discuss potential barriers to the bench-to-bedside transfer of knowledge and clinical application of exciting recent discoveries. Overall, clinically meaningful advances in the treatment of depression have not reached a large proportion of depressed patients, including those with treatment-resistant depression, who might benefit the most from the novel antidepressants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Psychopharmacology: From Bench to Bedside)
24 pages, 340 KiB  
Review
Recent Advances in Psychopharmacology: From Bench to Bedside Novel Trends in Schizophrenia
by Asim A. Shah and Syed Z. Iqbal
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(3), 411; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13030411 - 25 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2823
Abstract
Research in the field of psychopharmacology is ongoing to develop novel compounds which can revolutionize the treatment of psychiatric disorders. The concept of bench-to-bedside is a tedious process, transforming the initial research performed in the laboratories into novel treatment options. Schizophrenia (SCZ) is [...] Read more.
Research in the field of psychopharmacology is ongoing to develop novel compounds which can revolutionize the treatment of psychiatric disorders. The concept of bench-to-bedside is a tedious process, transforming the initial research performed in the laboratories into novel treatment options. Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a chronic psychiatric illness with significant morbidity and mortality. SCZ not only presents with psychotic symptoms including hallucinations and delusions but also with negative and cognitive symptoms. The negative symptoms include the diminished ability to express emotions, loss of pleasure, and motivation with minimal social interactions. Conventional antipsychotics primarily target positive symptoms with minimal therapeutic benefits for negative and cognitive symptoms along with metabolic side effects. Researchers have explored novel targets to develop new compounds to overcome the above limitations. The glutamatergic system has provided new hope in treating schizophrenia by targeting negative and cognitive symptoms. Other receptor modulators, including serotonergic, phosphodiesterase, trans-amine-associated receptors, etc., are novel targets for developing new compounds. Future research is required in this field to explore novel compounds and establish their efficacy and safety for the treatment of schizophrenia. Last but not least, pharmacogenomics has effectively utilized genetic information to develop novel compounds by minimizing the risk of failure of the clinical trials and enhancing efficacy and safety. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Psychopharmacology: From Bench to Bedside)
Back to TopTop