Sediment Remediation at Harbour

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Coastal Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 February 2022) | Viewed by 8130

Image courtesy of Dr. Ahmed Benamar

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratoire Ondes et Milieux Complexes, University of Le Havre-Normandie, Le Havre, France
Interests: geo-environmental engineering; soil and sediment remediation; mud rheology; soil erosion; application of ultrasonic in geotechnics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ongoing increases in the capacity of both maritime transport and harbours necessitate maintaining safely navigable waterways. The management of the growing volumes of dredged marine sediments constitutes a challenge for harbour authorities. Dredging operations also present a risk of contaminating coastal waters and ecosystems. Because of their potential contamination, dredged materials are no longer systematically dumped at sea, and this restriction ultimately leads managers to provide deposit installations ashore. Remediation techniques are available and can remove, reduce, immobilise or confine the pollutants. The selection of these techniques depends on the management policy applied at each site. The purpose of the invited Special Issue is to publish the most exciting research with respect to the above topic and to provide rapid reviewing and publishing, disseminating articles for research, teaching, and reference purposes. High-quality papers directly related to the various aspects mentioned below are encouraged.

Dr. Ahmed Benamar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sediment dredging management
  • Remediation technologies (electrokinetics, phytoremediation, bioremediation, etc.)
  • Laboratory investigations
  • Analytical techniques
  • Electrochemical process engineering and technology
  • Behaviour and modelling
  • Large-scale and field application of sediment remediation
  • Case studies
  • Environmental policy for dredging operations

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

8 pages, 1584 KiB  
Article
Enhanced Electroremediation of Metals from Dredged Marine Sediment under Periodic Voltage Using EDDS and Citric Acid
by Mohamed-Tahar Ammami, Ahmed Benamar and Florence Portet-Koltalo
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(4), 553; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10040553 - 18 Apr 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1544
Abstract
The electrokinetic remediation (EKR) method has been extensively considered for the removal of inorganic pollutants from contaminated dredged sediment. In addition, the use of chelating agents as electrolyte solutions has been beneficial in increasing the mobility of metals. This study investigated the metals’ [...] Read more.
The electrokinetic remediation (EKR) method has been extensively considered for the removal of inorganic pollutants from contaminated dredged sediment. In addition, the use of chelating agents as electrolyte solutions has been beneficial in increasing the mobility of metals. This study investigated the metals’ (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn) mobilities by assessing the effect of two environmentally friendly chelating agents, ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) and citric acid (CA), in enhancing the EKR efficiency under a periodic voltage gradient. The results showed that, for the same concentration (0.1 mol L−1), CA is more suitable for enhancing the removal of Cr (67.83%), Cu (59.77%), and Pb (32.05%) by chelating and desorbing them from the sediment matrix and concentrating them in the electrode compartments. EDDS provided efficiency to improve the Cd extraction percentage (45.87%), whereas CA and EDDS had comparable improvement removal impacts on Zn EKR (39.32% and 41.37%, respectively). From the comparison with previous results obtained with a continuous voltage, applying a periodic voltage gradient associated with a low concentration of chelating agents led to a promising result. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sediment Remediation at Harbour)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 3804 KiB  
Article
Influence of Anaerobic Degradation of Organic Matter on the Rheological Properties of Cohesive Mud from Different European Ports
by Ahmad Shakeel, Florian Zander, Julia Gebert, Claire Chassagne and Alex Kirichek
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(3), 446; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10030446 - 21 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1828
Abstract
The presence of clay-organic flocs in cohesive mud results in a complex rheological behavior of mud, including viscoelasticity, shear-thinning, thixotropy and two-step yielding. In this study, the effect of microbial degradation of organic matter on the rheological properties of mud samples, collected from [...] Read more.
The presence of clay-organic flocs in cohesive mud results in a complex rheological behavior of mud, including viscoelasticity, shear-thinning, thixotropy and two-step yielding. In this study, the effect of microbial degradation of organic matter on the rheological properties of mud samples, collected from different ports, was examined. The mud samples were collected from five different European ports (Port of Antwerp (PoA), Port of Bremerhaven (PoB), Port of Emden (PoE), Port of Hamburg (PoH) and Port of Rotterdam (PoR)), displaying varying sediment properties. The rheological analysis of fresh and degraded mud samples was performed with the help of several tests, including stress ramp-up tests, amplitude sweep tests, frequency sweep tests, time-dependent tests and structural recovery tests. The results showed: (i) a significant decrease in yield stresses and complex modulus after organic matter degradation for mud samples from PoA, PoH and PoR, (ii) a negligible change in rheological properties (yield stresses, crossover amplitude and complex modulus) for mud samples from PoB, and (iii) a significant increase in rheological properties for mud samples from PoE. For time-dependent tests, mud samples from PoB showed a substantial increase in hysteresis (~50% mean value) as compared to the changes in yield stresses and crossover amplitude. The analysis of gas production during degradation of organic matter showed a (i) significant release of carbon per g dry matter for mud samples from PoA, PoH and PoR, (ii) lower carbon release per g dry matter for mud samples from PoB, and (iii) a negligible carbon release per g dry matter for mud samples from PoE, which corresponded well with the change in rheological properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sediment Remediation at Harbour)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 5815 KiB  
Article
Tailored Leaching Tests as a Tool for Environmental Management of Mine Tailings Disposal at Sea
by Kristine B. Pedersen, Tore Lejon and Anita Evenset
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(3), 405; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10030405 - 10 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2358
Abstract
The expanding human activities in coastal areas increase the need for developing solutions to limit impacts on the marine environment. Sea disposal affects the marine environment, but despite the growing knowledge of potential impacts, there are still no standardized leaching tests for sea [...] Read more.
The expanding human activities in coastal areas increase the need for developing solutions to limit impacts on the marine environment. Sea disposal affects the marine environment, but despite the growing knowledge of potential impacts, there are still no standardized leaching tests for sea disposal. The aim of this study was to contribute to the development of leaching tests, exemplified using mine tailings, planned for submarine disposal in the Repparfjord, Norway. The mine tailings had elevated concentrations of Ba, Cr, Cu, Mn and Ni compared to background concentrations in the Repparfjord. Variables known to affect metal leaching in marine environments (DOC, pH, salinity, temperature, aerated/anoxic) were studied, as was the effect of flocculant (Magnafloc10), planned to be added prior to discharge. Stirred/non-stirred setups simulated the resuspension and disposal phases. Leaching of metals was below 2% in all experiments, with the highest rate observed for Cu and Mn. Multivariate analysis revealed a different variable importance for metals depending on their association with minerals. Higher leaching during resuspension than disposal, and lower leaching with the addition of Magnafloc10, especially for Cu and Mn, was observed. The leaching tests performed in this study are transferable to other materials for sea disposal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sediment Remediation at Harbour)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 4184 KiB  
Article
Dredged Material Decision Tool (DMDT) for Sustainable Beneficial Reuse Applications
by Diana Arreola, Julian Hernandez, Valeria Vesco and Krishna R. Reddy
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(2), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10020178 - 28 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2965
Abstract
The Dredged Material Decision Tool (DMDT) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to allow project managers, stakeholders, and communities to quantify environmental, economic, and social considerations of using dredged material for beneficial purposes. Dredged material may be disposed in [...] Read more.
The Dredged Material Decision Tool (DMDT) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to allow project managers, stakeholders, and communities to quantify environmental, economic, and social considerations of using dredged material for beneficial purposes. Dredged material may be disposed in a confined disposal facility (CDF); however, this option is unfavorable because of the finite capacity problems these facilities pose. A more sustainable option is to use dredged materials beneficially such as construction material, for habitat restoration, or for brownfield remediation projects. This study demonstrates the applicability of the DMDT to three relevant candidate projects: (1) Dog Beach, Greenwood, and Lee Street Beaches (Evanston, IL, USA); (2) New York-New Jersey Harbor (New York/New Jersey); and (3) Poplar Island (Chesapeake Bay). The DMDT requires the project information and then completion of worksheets with each criteria (biophysical environment, economic, governance, social, and built environment) ranked, weighed, and scored. The DMDT is applied for all potential alternatives and the results are then analyzed to select the best beneficial reuse alternative. It was found that for the beaches in Evanston, the most beneficial option was on-beach placement with hydraulic dredging. The best option for the New Jersey Harbor was found to be using for brownfield and landfill remediation. The best option for Poplar Island was the lateral and vertical expansion of 50% uplands and 50% wetlands. Overall, DMDT is found to be a valuable tool to facilitate the evaluation of multi-criteria based on the project-specific data and help select the best beneficial use alternative for the dredged material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sediment Remediation at Harbour)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop