Special Issue "Monitoring of Coastal and Offshore Structures"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Franck Schoefs
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Research in Civil and Mechanical Engineering (GeM, CNRS UMR 6183), Sea and Littoral Research Institute (IUML, CNRS FR 3473), Université de Nantes, Centrale Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssinière BP 92208, 44322 Nantes, France
Interests: macrofouling of structures; probabilistic modelling of marine and coastal material degradation processes; structural reliability of offshore structures; inspection maintenance and repair of offshore and coastal structures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Structural monitoring has received greater attention over the last two decades due to technological advances and progress in numerical methods, data processing and treatment. Due to complex environmental demand and structural optimization, the design and maintenance of coastal and offshore structures require more and more knowledge. There has been extensive research on various aspects of structural monitoring in marine environments to understand their behaviour or survey their performance over time. The purpose of this Special Issue is to publish the most exciting research with respect to the above subjects and to provide a rapid turn-around time regarding reviewing and publishing, and to disseminate the articles freely for research, teaching, and reference purposes. High quality papers are encouraged for publication that directly related to various aspects described below. Scientific analysis of case studies is welcome. Authors are encouraged to highlight the need, benefit, and interest of monitoring for engineers and stake-holders.

Topics—Monitoring of Coastal and Offshore Structures

  • health monitoring in the presence of degradation processes and fatigue
  • sensor performance in marine environments
  • development and application of non-destructive techniques
  • data treatment
  • statistical methods
  • probabilistic methods
  • measurement of loading
  • value of information from structural health monitoring
  • identification of material properties
  • case studies: offshore oil and gas platforms, wind or ocean energy structures, wharves, dikes, seawalls.
  • monitoring of soil, dams and embankment.
  • performance of maintenance and repair

Prof. Dr. Franck Schoefs
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • numerical methods
  • sensors
  • identification, updating and inverse analysis
  • case studies
  • health monitoring
  • marine loading
  • marine degradation processes
  • non-destructive techniques

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Model of Bio-Colonisation on Mooring Lines:Updating Strategy Based on a Static Qualifying Sea State for Floating Wind Turbines
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(2), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8020108 - 11 Feb 2020
Abstract
Bio-colonisation affects the ageing of materials and the behaviour of offshore structures. Mooring systems and umbilicals belong to the family of slender bodies which are components sensitive to bio-colonisation because of a change of dynamic behaviour due to shape, roughness and mass modifications. [...] Read more.
Bio-colonisation affects the ageing of materials and the behaviour of offshore structures. Mooring systems and umbilicals belong to the family of slender bodies which are components sensitive to bio-colonisation because of a change of dynamic behaviour due to shape, roughness and mass modifications. However, this stochastic process in time and space is hard to predict. The purpose is then twofold: first, to provide a stochastic spatial model of the bio-colonisation on a mooring line; second, to show that in some defined environmental conditions, such as low wave height, low wind and current velocities, the monitoring of mooring lines tension can help to assess and reduce uncertainty on this model. Therefore, a comprehensive stochastic modelling based on mussels colonisation was carried out using on-site videotapes, experimental campaigns and expert knowledge. We studied the efficiency of a virtual sensing network using this model and a conditional entropy metric. It is first shown that the spatial model fits well with experimental data, and second that a denser medium accuracy sensor network is to be preferred to a single high accuracy fairlead sensor to reduce the uncertainty on the model parameters. It is then worth updating bio-colonisation on mooring lines during the life-time of a floating wind turbine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring of Coastal and Offshore Structures)
Open AccessArticle
Investigating Polymer Fibre Optics for Condition Monitoring of Synthetic Mooring Lines
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(2), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8020103 - 09 Feb 2020
Abstract
Synthetic mooring lines are becoming a popular alternative to conventional chain mooring systems. For marine renewable energy devices, they have been considered as an enabling technology for this nascent sector, given their reduced costs and ease of deployment. However, the extreme operating environment [...] Read more.
Synthetic mooring lines are becoming a popular alternative to conventional chain mooring systems. For marine renewable energy devices, they have been considered as an enabling technology for this nascent sector, given their reduced costs and ease of deployment. However, the extreme operating environment has led to an increased interest in the ‘insitu’ condition monitoring of these mooring lines. This paper considers the use of polymer fibre optic technology and the optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) technique for the condition monitoring of synthetic mooring lines. To establish the operating envelope of the fibres, Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) polymer optical fibres are mechanically tested. Additionally, an OTDR is used to monitor fibres whilst under elongation using a tensile test machine, and the sensitivity of the system in monitoring strain is established. At the lowest strain rate, the average proportional limit and yield points of the fibres are found at 1.16% strain and 5.41% strain, respectively. Fatigue exposure of fibres up to 1.25% strain identifies no measurable effect on fibres’ proportional limit or yield point. The occurrence of significant creep is identified for fibres strained beyond 1.5%. The OTDR system is able to identify strains at and above 4%. The study identifies important criteria that should be considered in the integration of polymer optical fibres for mooring applications. Limitations are discussed and suggestions for progressing this technology are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring of Coastal and Offshore Structures)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Long-Term Stochastic Modeling of Sheet Pile Corrosion in Coastal Environment from On-Site Measurements
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(2), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8020070 - 23 Jan 2020
Abstract
Optimization of maintenance and design of coastal steel infrastructure needs for long-term predictive degradation models. The phenomenon of corrosion in the offshore and coastal environment is very complex due to the stochastic and changing nature of the environment (temperature, water chemical properties) and [...] Read more.
Optimization of maintenance and design of coastal steel infrastructure needs for long-term predictive degradation models. The phenomenon of corrosion in the offshore and coastal environment is very complex due to the stochastic and changing nature of the environment (temperature, water chemical properties) and the multiple involved processes in competition. In the GEROM French project, the objective was to build a database of the residual thickness measured from ultrasonic measurements on sheet piles and piles carried out during 40 years in commercial and military harbors along the French coast. A total amount of 35,460 measurements were gathered. After a detailed analysis of the data and statistical modeling, a probabilistic model of corrosion is proposed for sheet piles. It relies on a piecewise description of the process with the depth depending on the exposed zone and a time-dependent evolution of parameters of the gamma probability density function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring of Coastal and Offshore Structures)
Open AccessArticle
A Data-Driven Approach Based on Multivariate Copulas for Quantitative Risk Assessment of Concrete Dam
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(10), 353; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7100353 - 03 Oct 2019
Abstract
Risk assessment of dam’s running status is an important part of dam management. A data-driven method based on monitored displacement data has been applied in risk assessment, owing to its easy operation and real-time analysis. However, previous data-driven methods considered displacement data series [...] Read more.
Risk assessment of dam’s running status is an important part of dam management. A data-driven method based on monitored displacement data has been applied in risk assessment, owing to its easy operation and real-time analysis. However, previous data-driven methods considered displacement data series at each monitoring point as an independent variable and assessed the running status of each monitoring point separately, without considering the correlation between displacement of different monitoring points. In addition, previous studies assessed the dam’s running status qualitatively, without quantifying the risk probability. To solve the above two issues, a displacement-data driven method based on a multivariate copula function is proposed in this paper. Multivariate copula functions can construct a joint distribution which reveals the relevance structure of random variables. We assumed that the risk probability of each dam section is independent and took monitoring points at one dam section as examples. Starting from the risk assessment of single monitoring points, we calculated the residual between the monitored displacement data and the modelled data estimated by the statistical model, and built a risk ratio function based on the residual. Then, using the multivariate copula function, we obtained a combined risk ratio of multi-monitoring points which took the correlation between each monitoring point into account. Finally, a case study was provided. The proposed method not only quantitatively assessed the probability of the real-time dam risk but also considered the correlation between the displacement data of different monitoring points. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring of Coastal and Offshore Structures)
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Open AccessArticle
Buried Depth of a Submarine Pipeline Based on Anchor Penetration
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(8), 257; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7080257 - 06 Aug 2019
Abstract
Anchor penetration is an important issue involved in the study of submarine pipeline damage accidents. To explore the penetration of a ship’s anchor under certain conditions, this study investigated the motion and force of an anchor and formulated a calculation method for the [...] Read more.
Anchor penetration is an important issue involved in the study of submarine pipeline damage accidents. To explore the penetration of a ship’s anchor under certain conditions, this study investigated the motion and force of an anchor and formulated a calculation method for the bottoming speed of an anchor. Meanwhile, the depth of anchor penetration was calculated under different conditions according to bottoming speed through programming. Finally, the reliability of the calculation method for the penetration depth was verified by comparing the actual measurement and the numerical simulation. On the basis of the findings, the calculation results were further analyzed, and conclusions were derived regarding the relationship between anchor mass, the horizontal projected area of the anchor, the anchor height on the water surface, and water depth. The conclusions provide suggestions for the application of anchor penetration in terms of seabed depth with certain reference values. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring of Coastal and Offshore Structures)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Monitoring of a Reinforced Concrete Wharf Using Structural Health Monitoring System and Material Testing
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(4), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7040084 - 27 Mar 2019
Abstract
This paper presents the Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system developed for a port wharf of a freight terminal, in Saint-Nazaire, France. This concrete structure has been equipped with a multi-sensor system for the monitoring of concrete ageing. The measurement chain is designed to [...] Read more.
This paper presents the Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system developed for a port wharf of a freight terminal, in Saint-Nazaire, France. This concrete structure has been equipped with a multi-sensor system for the monitoring of concrete ageing. The measurement chain is designed to detect the penetration of chloride ions in order to quantify the risk of reinforcement bars corrosion. Modifications of the mechanical behavior of the structural elements of the wharf are also monitored. At first, the sensors embedded within the structure and the acquisition devices are described. The data from the monitoring performed during the first months of the structure service life are then presented. The concrete monitoring at early age providing data like temperature history, strain and resistivity is useful both for the wharf owner and the construction company since it indicates where concrete shrinkage is likely to cause cracking and gives an indicator of material hardening. These data were compared to the results of material tests carried out on concrete. The study shows that a measurement chain dedicated to the SHM could be a useful tool for validating the quality of the construction of a reinforced concrete structure before being used in the framework of long-term monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring of Coastal and Offshore Structures)
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