Special Issue "Offshore and Onshore Marine Renewable Energy"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 October 2021) | Viewed by 4696

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Silvio Barbarelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical, Energy and Management Engineering, University of Calabria, Cosenza, Italy
Interests: hydraulic machines; pumps as turbines; marine turbines; renewable energies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, much attention has been paid to renewable energies, particularly marine resources, which have huge potential but are, at present, exploited only to a small degree. Several difficulties hinder the development of new devices, from the installation of platforms (floating or fixed on the seabed) and the high costs associated with their construction to maintenance problems. In addition, marine machines have yet to be optimized, and new specially designed prototypes must be built on a significant scale and tested in suitable test centres, which can be very expensive. The Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is delighted to announce a timely Special Issue on “Offshore and Onshore Marine Renewable Energies”, with the aim of addressing topics related to stand-alone marine installations or arrays of marine installations. The Special Issue intends to cover, but will not be limited to, the following topics:

  • wave and tidal resource assessment and characterization;
  • tidal current modeling;
  • the design of novel wave and tidal energy converters;
  • the design of blades for marine machines;
  • hydrodynamic and electrical components for wave and tidal machines;
  • integration of control and power systems for wave and tidal arrays; and
  • hybrid wave, tidal, and offshore wind arrays.

Dr. Silvio Barbarelli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Marine technologies
  • Tidal energy converters
  • Wave energy converters
  • Marine turbines
  • Blade design
  • Tidal current modeling
  • Hydraulic and electrical components for marine plants.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Wave Energy Resource Harnessing Assessment in a Subtropical Coastal Region of the Pacific
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(11), 1264; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9111264 - 12 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 802
Abstract
Most wave energy converters (WECs) are designed to operate in high-latitude energetic seas, limiting their performance in regions usually dominated by milder conditions. The present study assesses the performance of complete test-stage WECs in farms that satisfy a decentralized energy scheme (DES) on [...] Read more.
Most wave energy converters (WECs) are designed to operate in high-latitude energetic seas, limiting their performance in regions usually dominated by milder conditions. The present study assesses the performance of complete test-stage WECs in farms that satisfy a decentralized energy scheme (DES) on the coast of Baja California, which is considered one of the most energetic regions along the Mexican Pacific. A high-resolution 11-year nearshore wave hindcast was performed and validated with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) data to characterize the wave energy resource in the study area. Two hotspots were identified from the wave power climatology. In these sites, the extractive capacities of seven well-known WEC technologies were determined based on their power matrices. Finally, the power extracted by small WEC farms, with the minimum number of devices required to satisfy a DES, was estimated. The studied region has moderate wave power availability with marked seasonality and low inter-annual variability. Out of all the evaluated devices, WaveDragon extracts the highest wave power; however, Pelamis has the best performance, with maximum monthly mean capacity factors up to 40%. Coupling WEC farms with storage modules or hybrid renewable systems are recommended to satisfy a continuous DES during the less energetic summer months. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Offshore and Onshore Marine Renewable Energy)
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Article
Prediction of Wave Energy Transformation Capability in Isolated Islands by Using the Monte Carlo Method
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(9), 980; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9090980 - 07 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 811
Abstract
In this work, a mathematical computer simulation model is used to predict the possible energy generated from different Waves Energy Converters (WECs) in the Canary Islands. The Monte Carlo Method is the computer simulation model proposed to predict the generated energy. The Waves [...] Read more.
In this work, a mathematical computer simulation model is used to predict the possible energy generated from different Waves Energy Converters (WECs) in the Canary Islands. The Monte Carlo Method is the computer simulation model proposed to predict the generated energy. The Waves Energy Converter systems analyzed in the study were, the Aqua Buoy, Wave Dragon and Pelamis converters. The models were implemented and validated, with the dataset of Gran Canaria deep water buoy. This buoy belongs to a network of buoys belonging to Spain’s State Ports and they cover a dataset period of 22 years. The research has concluded that it is possible to affirm that the achieved model is a strong tool to compute the possible energy of any WECs, when the power matrix is known. The model based on the Monte Carlo simulation can be used in isolated islands of the Atlantic Ocean and can be extrapolated to other regions with the same characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Offshore and Onshore Marine Renewable Energy)
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Article
Reliability Modelling and Analysis of the Power Take-Off System of an Oscillating Wave Surge Converter
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(5), 552; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9050552 - 20 May 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 850
Abstract
Wave power is a potential technology for generating sustainable renewable energy. Several types of wave energy converters (WECs) have been proposed for this purpose. WECs operate in a harsh maritime environment that sets strict limitations on how and when the device can be [...] Read more.
Wave power is a potential technology for generating sustainable renewable energy. Several types of wave energy converters (WECs) have been proposed for this purpose. WECs operate in a harsh maritime environment that sets strict limitations on how and when the device can be economically and safely reached for maintenance. Thus, to ensure profitable energy generation over the system life cycle, system reliability is a key aspect to be considered in WEC development. In this article, we describe a reliability analysis approach for WEC development, based on the use of reliability block diagram (RBD) modelling. We apply the approach in a case study involving a submerged oscillating wave surge converter device concept that utilizes hydraulics in its power take-off system. In addition to describing the modelling approach, we discuss the data sources that were used for gathering reliability data for the components used in a novel system concept with very limited historical or experimental data available. This includes considerations of the data quality from various sources. As a result, we present examples of applying the RBD modelling approach in the context of WEC development and discuss the applicability of the approach in supporting the development of new technologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Offshore and Onshore Marine Renewable Energy)
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Review

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Review
The Tidal Stream Energy Resource of the Fromveur Strait—A Review
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(12), 1037; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8121037 - 19 Dec 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1494
Abstract
Refined assessments of the available tidal stream energy resource are required to optimize turbines design and guarantee successful implementations and operations of devices in the marine environment. Investigations primary focused on identifying areas with maximum current speeds. However, further information may be reached [...] Read more.
Refined assessments of the available tidal stream energy resource are required to optimize turbines design and guarantee successful implementations and operations of devices in the marine environment. Investigations primary focused on identifying areas with maximum current speeds. However, further information may be reached by exhibiting (i) resource temporal variability, (ii) superimposed effects of meteo-oceanographic conditions (including especially wind-generated surface-gravity waves), and (iii) potential environmental impacts of operating turbines at the regional (e.g., changes in sediment transport and surrounding seabed features, effects on marine water quality, etc.) and local (wake-wake interactions and energy output) scales. These aspects are here investigated by reviewing a series of research studies dedicated to the Fromveur Strait off western Brittany, a region with strong potential for tidal array development along the coast of France. Particular attention is dedicated to the exploitation of combined in-situ and remote-sensing observations and numerical simulations. Beyond a site specific characterization of the tidal stream energy resource, this review promotes a series of original approaches and analysis methods for turbines optimization, thus complementing technical specifications to secure the key steps of a tidal energy project and promote the growth of a reliable tidal stream energy exploitation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Offshore and Onshore Marine Renewable Energy)
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