Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 7th PRIMaRE Conference 2020"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Deborah Greaves
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Computing and Mathematics, University of Plymouth (UoP), Plymouth, Devon PL4 8AA, UK
Interests: marine renewable energy; computational fluid dynamics (CFD); fluid structure interaction
Dr. Scott Brown
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Computing and Mathematics, University of Plymouth (UoP), Plymouth, Devon PL4 8AA, UK
Interests: computational fluid dynamics; coastal processes; renewable energy; numerical model development (OpenFOAM)
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For the marine renewable energy sector to achieve its commercialization targets and become successful in its development, enhanced collaboration between members of the sector is required, particularly between research institutions. This provides the motivation for the Partnership for Research in Marine Renewable Energy (PRIMaRE): a consortium of marine renewable energy experts across higher education, research, and industry who have joined together to establish a ‘network of excellence’ centered in the southwest of the UK. As part of their strategy, PRIMaRE holds an annual conference series that provides a forum for presenting and discussing the latest research and development in all areas relating to marine renewable energy to a diverse community including industrial developers, university researchers, marine environmentalists, and policymakers. This Special Issue will publish the most exciting research from the 7th PRIMaRE conference, to provide a rapid turn-around time regarding reviewing and publishing, and disseminate the articles freely for research, teaching, and reference purposes.

High-quality and novel papers directly related to various aspects of marine renewable energy are encouraged, including the following:

  • Technology
  • Policy
  • Environment
  • Hydrodynamics
  • Resource characterization
  • Materials
  • Operation and management


Prof. Dr. Deborah Greaves
Dr. Scott Brown
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Wave energy
  • Tidal energy
  • Floating offshore wind
  • Technology
  • Policy
  • Environment
  • Hydrodynamics
  • Resource characterization
  • Materials
  • Operation and management

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Physical Modelling of the Effect on the Wave Field of the WaveCat Wave Energy Converter
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(3), 309; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9030309 - 11 Mar 2021
Viewed by 440
Abstract
The WaveCat is a moored Wave Energy Converter design which uses wave overtopping discharge into a variable v-shaped hull, to generate electricity through low head turbines. Physical model tests of WaveCat WEC were carried out to determine the device reflection, transmission, absorption and [...] Read more.
The WaveCat is a moored Wave Energy Converter design which uses wave overtopping discharge into a variable v-shaped hull, to generate electricity through low head turbines. Physical model tests of WaveCat WEC were carried out to determine the device reflection, transmission, absorption and capture coefficients based on selected wave conditions. The model scale was 1:30, with hulls of 3 m in length, 0.4 m in height and a freeboard of 0.2 m. Wave gauges monitored the surface elevation at discrete points around the experimental area, and level sensors and flowmeters recorded the amount of water captured and released by the model. Random waves of significant wave height between 0.03 m and 0.12 m and peak wave periods of 0.91 s to 2.37 s at model scale were tested. The wedge angle of the device was set to 60°. A reflection analysis was carried out using a revised three probe method and spectral analysis of the surface elevation to determine the incident, reflected and transmitted energy. The results show that the reflection coefficient is highest (0.79) at low significant wave height and low peak wave period, the transmission coefficient is highest (0.98) at low significant wave height and high peak wave period, and absorption coefficient is highest (0.78) when significant wave height is high and peak wave period is low. The model also shows the highest Capture Width Ratio (0.015) at wavelengths on the order of model length. The results have particular implications for wave energy conversion prediction potential using this design of device. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from the 7th PRIMaRE Conference 2020)
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Article
The Use of Animal-Borne Biologging and Telemetry Data to Quantify Spatial Overlap of Wildlife with Marine Renewables
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(3), 263; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9030263 - 02 Mar 2021
Viewed by 1170
Abstract
The growth of the marine renewable energy sector requires the potential effects on marine wildlife to be considered carefully. For this purpose, utilization distributions derived from animal-borne biologging and telemetry data provide accurate information on individual space use. The degree of spatial overlap [...] Read more.
The growth of the marine renewable energy sector requires the potential effects on marine wildlife to be considered carefully. For this purpose, utilization distributions derived from animal-borne biologging and telemetry data provide accurate information on individual space use. The degree of spatial overlap between potentially vulnerable wildlife such as seabirds and development areas can subsequently be quantified and incorporated into impact assessments and siting decisions. While rich in information, processing and analyses of animal-borne tracking data are often not trivial. There is therefore a need for straightforward and reproducible workflows for this technique to be useful to marine renewables stakeholders. The aim of this study was to develop an analysis workflow to extract utilization distributions from animal-borne biologging and telemetry data explicitly for use in assessment of animal spatial overlap with marine renewable energy development areas. We applied the method to European shags (Phalacrocorax aristotelis) in relation to tidal stream turbines. While shag occurrence in the tidal development area was high (99.4%), there was no overlap (0.14%) with the smaller tidal lease sites within the development area. The method can be applied to any animal-borne bio-tracking datasets and is relevant to stakeholders aiming to quantify environmental effects of marine renewables. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from the 7th PRIMaRE Conference 2020)
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Article
A Cyclic Macro-Element Framework for Consolidation-Dependent Three-Dimensional Capacity of Plate Anchors
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(2), 199; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9020199 - 13 Feb 2021
Viewed by 720
Abstract
This paper presents a new macro-element modelling framework for plate anchors which enables the effect of pore water pressure changes and the related evolution of soil strength during the process of cyclic loading and consolidation to be captured. The proposed modelling framework combines [...] Read more.
This paper presents a new macro-element modelling framework for plate anchors which enables the effect of pore water pressure changes and the related evolution of soil strength during the process of cyclic loading and consolidation to be captured. The proposed modelling framework combines an advanced macro-element model for plate anchors, expanded to capture the cyclic loading behaviour, with a simple one-dimensional model of undrained shearing and consolidation for a soil element representative of the whole soil mass around the anchor. The representative soil element tracks the effects of changes in effective stress on the soil strength, which in turn governs the anchor capacity in the macro-element model. The two modelling components are linked through a mobilised capacity compatibility condition. It will be firstly shown that such modelling framework is able to capture the expected changes in an anchor’s capacity related to cyclic pore pressure generation and consolidation under one-dimensional cyclic loading of the anchor. Then, the model will be used to explore the plate anchor’s behaviour and failure mechanisms under loading conditions which mobilise its full three-dimensional cyclic loading capacity. The macro-element model will identify some conflicting mechanisms (i.e., the anchor’s kinematic/rotation and soil weakening/strengthening) governing the three-dimensional capacity of the anchor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from the 7th PRIMaRE Conference 2020)
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Article
Comparison of Macro-Scale Porosity Implementations for CFD Modelling of Wave Interaction with Thin Porous Structures
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(2), 150; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9020150 - 01 Feb 2021
Viewed by 873
Abstract
Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of wave interaction with thin perforated structures is of interest in a range of engineering applications. When large-scale effects such as forces and the overall flow behaviour are of interest, a microstructural resolution of the perforated geometry can [...] Read more.
Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of wave interaction with thin perforated structures is of interest in a range of engineering applications. When large-scale effects such as forces and the overall flow behaviour are of interest, a microstructural resolution of the perforated geometry can be excessive or prohibitive in terms of computational cost. More efficiently, a thin porous structure can be represented by its macro-scale effects by means of a quadratic momentum source or pressure-drop respectively. In the context of regular wave interaction with thin porous structures and within an incompressible, two-phase Navier–Stokes and volume-of-fluid framework (based on interFoam of OpenFOAM®), this work investigates porosity representation as a porous surface with a pressure-jump condition and as volumetric isotropic and anisotropic porous media. Potential differences between these three types of macro-scale porosity implementations are assessed in terms of qualitative flow visualizations, velocity profiles along the water column, the wave elevation near the structures and the horizontal force on the structures. The comparison shows that all three types of implementation are capable of reproducing large-scale effects of the wave-structure interaction and that the differences between all obtained results are relatively small. It was found that the isotropic porous media implementation is numerically the most stable and requires the shortest computation times. The pressure-jump implementation requires the smallest time steps for stability and thus the longest computation times. This is likely due to the spurious local velocities at the air-water interface as a result of the volume-of-fluid interface capturing method combined with interFoam’s segregated pressure-velocity coupling algorithm. This paper provides useful insights and recommendations for effective macro-scale modelling of thin porous structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from the 7th PRIMaRE Conference 2020)
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Article
3D FE-Informed Laboratory Soil Testing for the Design of Offshore Wind Turbine Monopiles
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(1), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9010101 - 19 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 713
Abstract
Based on advanced 3D finite element modelling, this paper analyses the stress paths experienced by soil elements in the vicinity of a monopile foundation for offshore wind turbines subjected to cyclic loading with the aim of informing soil laboratory testing in support of [...] Read more.
Based on advanced 3D finite element modelling, this paper analyses the stress paths experienced by soil elements in the vicinity of a monopile foundation for offshore wind turbines subjected to cyclic loading with the aim of informing soil laboratory testing in support of monopile foundation design. It is shown that the soil elements in front of the laterally loaded monopile are subjected to complex stress variations, which gradually evolve towards steady stress cycles as the cyclic lateral pile loading proceeds. The amplitude, direction and average value of such steady stress cycles are dependent on the depth and radial distance from the pile of the soil element, but it also invariably involves the cyclic rotation of principal stress axes. Complementary laboratory testing using the hollow-cylinder torsional apparatus was carried out on granular soil samples imposing cyclic stress paths (with up to about 3 × 104 cycles) which resemble those determined after 3D finite element analysis. The importance of considering the cyclic rotation of principal stress axes when investigating the response of soil elements under stress conditions mimicking those around a monopile foundation subjected to cyclic lateral loading is emphasised. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from the 7th PRIMaRE Conference 2020)
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