Special Issue "Progress in the Use of Plasma in Aesthetic Medicine: Benefits and Considerations"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery/Aesthetic Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 2019

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Adone Baroni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mental Health and Physics and Preventive Medicine, Unit of Dermatology, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, 80100 Naples, Italy
Interests: skin oncology; autoimmune skin diseases; infectious skin diseases; laser skin treatments; plasma radiofrequency ablation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The demand for non-invasive and safe technology for aesthetic treatments of the skin paved the way for the research of new technologies working with more efficacy and less collateral effects. Plasma skin regeneration is a relatively recent technique that uses ionizing energy produced by a plasma radiofrequency (PRF) device.

Plasma is also defined “the fourth state of the matter” derived by ionization of neutral gases present in the air. If a sufficient energy is applied by a radiofrequency generator to the gases, electrons escape from their atoms inducing a positive charge and ionization. This effect increases the number of electrons, creating positive charged particles called ions, and the dissociation of molecular bonds. Plasma energy deriving from the ionization of atmospheric gas between the tip of the device and the skin, induces a vaporization of the superficial layers and instantly heats in a controlled and uniform manner. Plasma sublimation works leaving a layer of intact and desiccated epidermis that acts as a natural biologic dressing and promotes a more rapid recovery, avoiding damaging the deeper layers of the skin and predisposing to a better healing. High precision, short operation time, no bleeding, less damage to other tissues, rapid formation of postoperative protection layer, fast healing of wound surface, immediate return to normal activity, no visible scars, no hyperpigmentation, no infection, no pain, and very slight inflammatory reaction after sessions, are the biggest advantages of the technique.

Applications are many, ranging from the removal of unsightly skin lesions, such as fibromas, dermal nevi, xanthelasma palpebrarum, dyskeratosis, angiomas, warts, solar lentigo and seborrheic keratosis, to the correction of scars, treatment of blepharochalasis (non-surgical blepharoplasty), periocular and perioral wrinkles, and active acne. In conclusion, PRF ablation can actually be considered a well‐tolerated, painless, safe, effective, and low‐cost procedure for skin treatments.

Prof. Adone Baroni
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • biomedical plasma applications
  • long-wave plasma radiofrequency ablation
  • plasma energy treatments
  • plasma medicine
  • benign skin lesions treatment
  • aesthetic medicine
  • facial skin aesthetic treatments
  • nonsurgical radiofrequency treatment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Plasma Radiofrequency Ablation for Scar Treatment
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(1), 140; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11010140 - 27 Dec 2021
Viewed by 987
Abstract
Scars are a common disfiguring sequela of various events such as acne, hidradenitis suppurativa, surgery, trauma, and burns, which can lead to serious psychosocial problems with a negative effect on the quality of life. Many conventional approaches have been proposed for the treatment [...] Read more.
Scars are a common disfiguring sequela of various events such as acne, hidradenitis suppurativa, surgery, trauma, and burns, which can lead to serious psychosocial problems with a negative effect on the quality of life. Many conventional approaches have been proposed for the treatment of scars, including surgical techniques, dermabrasion, chemical peels, topical silicone gel, 5-fluorouracile and dermal fillers injection or autologous fat transfer for atrophic scars, and corticosteroids injection for hypertrophic and keloid scars; however, they have sporadic effects. Ablative lasers, such as carbon dioxide laser or Erbium Yag laser, are associated with many collateral effects limiting their application. Non-ablative laser treatments have been shown to be safer and to have fewer side effects, but they have a reduction of clinical efficacy compared to ablative lasers and a minimal improvement of scars. The demand for minimal invasive and safe technology for the treatment of a scars has stimulated the search for more effective novel therapy with fewer collateral effects. Plasma radiofrequency ablation is a new technique consisting of the generation of plasma energy through the production of ionized energy, which thermally heats tissue in a uniform and controlled manner, through a plasma radiofrequency device, inducing a sublimation of the tissue. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of P-RF ablation in the treatment of scars performed with D.A.S. Medical device (Technolux, Italia), which is a tool working with the long-wave plasma radiofrequency principle. Full article
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Article
Static Crow’s Feet Treated with Voltaic Arc Dermabrasion (Atmospheric Plasma): Post-Operative Pain Assessment by Thermal Infrared Imaging
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(14), 3074; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10143074 - 12 Jul 2021
Viewed by 677
Abstract
Background: In the literature, several strategies have been described for the treatment of unaesthetic marks on the face resulting from the aging processes. The atmospheric plasma procedure is a non-invasive, inexpensive technique proposed for the rejuvenation of facial tissues. The aim of this [...] Read more.
Background: In the literature, several strategies have been described for the treatment of unaesthetic marks on the face resulting from the aging processes. The atmospheric plasma procedure is a non-invasive, inexpensive technique proposed for the rejuvenation of facial tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of voltaic arc dermabrasion (VAD) for the treatment of static crow’s feet of the periorbital area. Methods: The crow’s feet of 135 patients (127 female and 8 male) were treated using the VAD technique. The perioperative skin temperature measurement was assessed using an Infrared Temperature sensor. The pain was measured using the Visual Analogic Score (VAS) at 1 week, 1 month and 1 year. The patient’s and surgeon’s satisfaction were assessed using the Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (GAIS) at 1 month and 1 year from the procedure. The severity of the crow’s feet was rated using the Crow’s Feet Grading Scale (CFGS). Results: A complete epidermal healing of all the subjects treated was evident at 7 days. The atmospheric plasma technique showed an efficient treatment for the removal of the crow’s feet, with a good aesthetic outcome, high surgeon and patient satisfaction, without clinical complications. Conclusions: The atmospheric plasma technique can be a useful modality in the cosmetic as well as therapeutic treatment of crow’s feet. Full article
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