Special Issue "Managing Information and Communication Overload"

A special issue of Information (ISSN 2078-2489). This special issue belongs to the section "Information Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Joao Carlos Lopes Batista
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
ISCA-UA (Higher Institute for Accountancy and Administration), University of Aveiro, R. Associação Humanitária dos Bombeiros Voluntários de Aveiro, 3810-500 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: information overload; communication overload; higher education; communication technology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is no panacea to the ever-present issue of information overload. The current technological possibilities and management approaches are not enough to solve the problems of information overload. People continue to perceive a lot of low-quality information and information that causes tensions, conflicts, and stressful situations that hinder decision making and often lead to poor-quality decisions.

The development of the field of communication technologies has been stimulating new thinking on the issue of information overload. Due to the very large amounts of information that is transmitted, the need to manage the communication process prior to the information management process has led to communication overload issues. Communication through multiple technologies and at all times can be so overwhelming that it is in itself inhibiting the development of solutions to deal with information overload, making it necessary to deal with the eventual communication overload issues prior to the information itself.

The rationale of this Special Issue can be summarized in the following question: What information and communication technologies should be implemented, managed, and used so that people receive and process the right information, in the right format and in due time to make high-quality decisions, thus overcoming situations of information and communication overload?

In this Special Issue, we seek to include studies on the causes of information and communication overload, and especially on current and future solutions. Contributions from different scientific backgrounds are welcome, such as information science, information management, information systems, knowledge management, social media, engineering, psychology, and other related scientific areas. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Causes of information and communication overload;
  • Technological solutions to information and communication overload;
  • Management solutions and approaches to information and communication overload;
  • Decision process and information overload;
  • Decision process and communication overload;
  • Future trends on information and communication overload.

Prof. Joao Batista

Guest Editor

Keywords

  • Information overload
  • Communication overload
  • Decision process
  • Causes
  • Solutions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Managing News Overload (MNO): The COVID-19 Infodemic
Information 2020, 11(8), 375; https://doi.org/10.3390/info11080375 - 25 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2265
Abstract
A crucial area in which information overload is experienced is news consumption. Ever increasing sources and formats are becoming available through a combination of traditional and new (digital) media, including social media. In such an information and media rich environment, understanding how people [...] Read more.
A crucial area in which information overload is experienced is news consumption. Ever increasing sources and formats are becoming available through a combination of traditional and new (digital) media, including social media. In such an information and media rich environment, understanding how people access and manage news during a global health epidemic like COVID-19 becomes even more important. The designation of the current situation as an infodemic has raised concerns about the quality, accuracy and impact of information. Instances of misinformation are commonplace due, in part, to the speed and pervasive nature of social media and messaging applications in particular. This paper reports on data collected using media diaries from 15 university students in the United Arab Emirates documenting their news consumption in April 2020. Faced with a potentially infinite amount of information and news, participants demonstrate how they are managing news overload (MNO) using a number of complementary strategies. Results show that while consumption patterns vary, all diaries indicate that users’ ability to navigate the news landscape in a way that fulfils their needs is influenced by news sources; platform reliability and verification; sharing activity; and engagement with news. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Managing Information and Communication Overload)
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Open AccessReview
A Theoretical Conversation about Responses to Information Overload
Information 2020, 11(8), 379; https://doi.org/10.3390/info11080379 - 28 Jul 2020
Viewed by 1389
Abstract
In this study, information overload is viewed through the lenses of Library & Information Science and Communication Theory in order to offer recommended solutions for individuals experiencing overload. The purpose of this research was to apply LIS and COMM theories to the pathologies [...] Read more.
In this study, information overload is viewed through the lenses of Library & Information Science and Communication Theory in order to offer recommended solutions for individuals experiencing overload. The purpose of this research was to apply LIS and COMM theories to the pathologies and symptoms of information overload as experienced by individuals in an increasingly digital world. Extant survey work was reviewed and updated with literature collected through limited keyword searches. The authors framed active responses to information overload through dimensions selected from the European Commission’s Digital Competence Framework as applied to Al-Shboul & Abrizah’s (2016) Modes of Information Seeking. Further study should focus on international perspectives and addressing disparities in access to information. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Managing Information and Communication Overload)
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