Special Issue "Future Trends in Computer Programming Education"

A special issue of Information (ISSN 2078-2489). This special issue belongs to the section "Information Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 18 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ricardo Queirós
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
uniMAD, School of Media Arts and Design, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: e-learning interoperability; computer programming education; gamification
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Mário Pinto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
uniMAD, School of Media Arts and Design, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: computer programming education; gamification; knowledge management systems; e-learning
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Carlos Filipe Portela
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Prof. Alberto Simões
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
2Ai, School of Technology, Polytechnic Institute of Cávado e Ave, 4750-810 Barcelos, Portugal
Interests: natural language processing; programming languages; compilers; computer programming education
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Pedro Rangel Henriques
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Informática, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal
Interests: language processing and compilers; digital libraries; computer programming education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Computer programming is a complex and fascinating area. In the teaching–learning process, teachers face many difficulties in finding techniques and methodologies to facilitate the learning of languages and to foster problem-solving skills.

At the same time, students find it difficult to understand the subjects and do not feel motivated to continue pursuing their studies and achieve good grades.

This Special Issue will specifically focus on the new and innovative methodologies, best practices, trends, techniques, and tools toward improving the teaching–learning process of computer programming.

In this Special Issue, we are available to receive the selected best papers from the International Computer Programming Education Conference (ICPEC’2021), as well as other independent papers.

Prof. Ricardo Queirós
Prof. Mário Pinto
Prof. Carlos Filipe Portela
Prof. Alberto Simões
Prof. Dr. Pedro Rangel Henriques
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Computer Programming
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Gamification
  • Automatic Evaluation and Feedback
  • Internet-of-Things
  • Micro-Services
  • Data Science
  • Web 4.0

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Gauge Object Oriented Programming in Student’s Learning Performance, Normalized Learning Gains and Perceived Motivation with Serious Games
Information 2021, 12(3), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/info12030101 - 26 Feb 2021
Viewed by 481
Abstract
Serious Games (SG) provide a comfortable learning environment and are productive for various disciplines ranging from Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) to computer programming. The Object Oriented (OO) paradigm includes objects related to real life, and is considered a natural domain that [...] Read more.
Serious Games (SG) provide a comfortable learning environment and are productive for various disciplines ranging from Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) to computer programming. The Object Oriented (OO) paradigm includes objects related to real life, and is considered a natural domain that can be worked with. Nonetheless, mapping those real-life objects with basic Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) concepts becomes a challenge for students to understand. Therefore, this study is concerned with designing and developing an SG prototype to overcome students’ difficulties and misconceptions in learning OOP and achieving positive learning outcomes. An experimental evaluation was carried out to show the difference between the experimental group students’ performance, who interact with the developed game, and students of the control group, who learn via the traditional instructional method. The experimental evaluations’ main finding is that the experimental group’s performance is better than the control group. The experimental group’s Normalized Learning Gain (NLG) is significantly higher than the control group (p < 0.005, pairedt-test). The evaluation study results show that the developed prototype’s perceived motivation on the Instructional Materials Motivation Survey (IMMS) 5-point Likert scale resulted in the highest mean score for attention (3.87) followed by relevance (3.66) subcategories. The results of this study show that the developed SG prototype is an effective tool in education, which improves learning outcomes and it has the potential to motivate students to learn OOP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Trends in Computer Programming Education)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Teaching Sorting Algorithms. Why constructivism approach matters
Authors: Spyridon Doukakis, Athanasios Perdos
Affiliation: Department of Informatics, Ionian University
Abstract: One of the most important issues that students deal with in programming is sorting algorithms. Despite efforts to visualize or gamify the algorithms even with the use of dance interventions, learners seem to have difficulties to describe and use them. In the present study, an attempt was made to highlight this difficulty. 148 second-year computer science students were asked to describe to secondary school students (who already have knowledge concerning algorithmic constructs and arrays) one of the sorting algorithms and more specifically the bubble sort algorithm. The results show that only 31 students described its operation, while the other approaches contained misconceptions or described the idea of sorting and not the sorting algorithm. In the second phase, students were asked to determine how sorting algorithms had been taught in secondary and tertiary education. According to the results, 18 had the opportunity to construct a sorting algorithm. Of them, 15 successfully described the operation of the sorting algorithm in the first phase. The remaining 16 who had successfully described the operation of the sorting algorithm in the first phase were engaged with the algorithm, running it on a piece of paper by hand. It seems that this weakness is probably due to the direct presentation of sorting algorithms instead of giving students time to approach the algorithm in a constructive way. To this end, this paper proposes a teaching intervention in order to deal with the most common sorting algorithms, which utilizes pre-existing knowledge of learners and a scaffolding approach.

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