Special Issue "Applications of Virtual Simulation and Virtual Reality in Nursing"

A special issue of Informatics (ISSN 2227-9709). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Informatics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 August 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Cynthia L. Foronda
Website
Guest Editor
University of Miami, Coral Gables, USA
Interests: virtual simulation; educational technology; cultural humility

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Healthcare education is challenging. For nurse educators, aptly preparing nursing students to function in fast-paced, high-acuity settings with diverse patients and providers is an arduous task. Fortunately, experiential learning modalities including virtual simulation and virtual reality are showing promise to provide learners with better opportunities to practice a variety of high-level thinking skills prior to entering the profession. Research has demonstrated that virtually simulated experiences result in higher cognitive learning outcomes and longer retention of learning when compared to traditional teaching methods such as reading or lecture. Further, application of virtual simulation and virtual reality is beginning to emerge in the context of patient care. For example, virtual reality is being used to decrease patients’ experiences of anxiety and pain. As the use of virtual simulation and virtual reality are growing in nursing practice, this Special Issue seeks contributions about the use of virtual simulation, virtual reality, augmented reality, or mixed reality (XR) in the context of nursing or nursing education. Topics include but are not limited to:

  • applications of virtual simulation or XR to improve nursing student learning outcomes;
  • research (including feasibility studies) with virtual simulation, virtual reality, augmented reality, or mixed reality in the context of nursing;
  • quality improvement projects (or data-based projects) in practice settings about virtual simulation, virtual reality, augmented reality, or mixed reality in the context of nursing;
  • toolkits or strategies to assist in the design or development of virtual simulations or XR;
  • cost–benefit analyses of virtual simulation or XR in comparison to traditional means.

Dr. Cynthia L. Foronda
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Informatics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • virtual simulation
  • virtual reality
  • mixed reality
  • augmented reality
  • XR
  • nursing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Use of Virtual Reality to Reduce Anxiety and Pain of Adults Undergoing Outpatient Procedures
Informatics 2020, 7(3), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7030036 - 19 Sep 2020
Abstract
(1) Background: Research has demonstrated that virtual reality (VR) has reduced pain and anxiety for patients undergoing health procedures. The aim of this quality improvement project was to implement and evaluate immersive VR as a non-pharmacological intervention to reduce pain and anxiety [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Research has demonstrated that virtual reality (VR) has reduced pain and anxiety for patients undergoing health procedures. The aim of this quality improvement project was to implement and evaluate immersive VR as a non-pharmacological intervention to reduce pain and anxiety in those adults undergoing outpatient procedures under monitored anesthesia care. (2) Methods: This quality improvement project incorporated the Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) model and employed a pre/post-implementation evaluation. Seven patients used VR during outpatient surgeries. Pain and anxiety scores were evaluated. (3) Results: Patients using VR exhibited lower pain and anxiety scores post-procedure compared to pre-procedure. Both patients and providers indicated high satisfaction with the VR experience. (4) Conclusions: This quality improvement project demonstrated the successful translation of research into practice. VR is a novel intervention that can reduce both pain and anxiety to improve the patient’s perioperative experience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Virtual Simulation and Virtual Reality in Nursing)
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Open AccessArticle
Crossing the Power Line: Using Virtual Simulation to Prepare the First Responders of Utility Linemen
Informatics 2020, 7(3), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7030026 - 29 Jul 2020
Abstract
Virtual reality (VR) healthcare simulation has helped learners develop skills that are transferable to real-word conditions. Innovative strategies are needed to train workers to improve community safety. The purpose of this pilot project was to evaluate the use of a VR simulation applying [...] Read more.
Virtual reality (VR) healthcare simulation has helped learners develop skills that are transferable to real-word conditions. Innovative strategies are needed to train workers to improve community safety. The purpose of this pilot project was to evaluate the use of a VR simulation applying the International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL) Standards of Best Practice: SimulationSM Simulation Design with eight power line workers. Six power industry supervisors and educators assisted in facilitating three VR simulations with eight linemen participants. Kotter’s eight steps to leading change and the INACSL Standards of Best Practice: SimulationSM Simulation Design were utilized in working with energy leaders and VR developers to carry out this pilot project. Pre- and post-implementation surveys demonstrated a 28% improvement in participants’ learning outcomes. All three learning objectives were met. This project demonstrated the successful application of a translational framework and the INACSL Standards of Best Practice: SimulationSM in a VR context in the power industry. This process may be helpful to guide or inspire further adoption of VR in unconventional settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Virtual Simulation and Virtual Reality in Nursing)
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