Special Issue "Storytelling with Geographic Data"

A special issue of ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2018) | Viewed by 22016

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Sara Irina Fabrikant
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland
Interests: geographic information visualization and visual analytics; GIScience and cognition; graphical user interface design and evaluation; dynamic and responsive cartography
Prof. Susanne Bleisch
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Institute of Geomatics Engineering, FHNW University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, CH- 4132 Muttenz, Switzerland
Interests: geographic information visualization and visual analytics; graphical interfaces and visual analysis to support decision-making; visual communication through information graphics and visual storytelling; integration of vague or uncertain (geographical) information

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dynamic, interactive web maps, and online visual geoanalytics dashboards have become pervasive in all aspects of the mobile information society. They are interfaces to big data and support open data developments in science, government, and society at large. Rapid advances in digital, data-driven journalism and respective mass media communication on the Web 2.0, aimed at an increasingly technologically savvy general public, have brought about online storytelling displays that dynamically and interactively combine text, photos, maps, and graphs. Such geovisual stories, not only inform people about political, economic, and social phenomena and processes, but are also designed to support space–time inference and decision making, to persuade, to reframe thinking, and possibly also to change human behavior.

What are the best practices of online geovisual storytelling, a rapidly expanding domain of geographic information visualization and geovisual analytics? What are the sound design guidelines for the development and deployment of expressive, perceptually salient, and cognitively supportive online geographic information stories? What kinds of stories can be extracted from big geodata cockpits and dashboards, developed to summarize and communicate large amounts of big space–time datasets? What are proven metaphors or process designs supporting visual storytelling for different users and applications areas? How efficiently and effectively do uncovered data stories communicate statistical relationships to a broad and diverse set of non-expert users? What kinds of empirical methods need to be employed or need to be developed to empirically evaluate online geographic storytelling approaches?

We invite you to contribute to this Special Issue of the ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information to explore the frontier in geographic data driven story telling on the Web 2.0. We encourage submissions from all relevant disciplines (e.g., Geography, GIScience, Cartography, Computer Science, Information Visualization, Journalism, Mass Media Communication, Psychology, etc.) and from a diverse set of scientific practices (e.g., qualitative, quantitative approaches, etc.) aimed to further advance this transdisciplinary research field. We are especially looking for empirical contributions that evaluate new forms of online communication of geographic information for a broad range of issues, users, and respective user engagements.

Prof. Sara Irina Fabrikant
Prof. Susanne Bleisch
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Related References

  1. Gershon, N.; Page, W. What storytelling can do for information visualization. Commun. ACM Vol. 2001, 44, 31–37.

  2. Cartwright, W. Extending the Map Metaphor Using Web Delivered Multimedia. Int. J. Geogr. Inf. Sci. 1999, 13, 335–353.

  3. Eccles, R.; Kapler, T.; Harper, R.; Wright, W. Stories in GeoTime. In Porceedins of IEEE Symposium on Visual Analytics Science and Technology (VAST 2007), Sacramento, CA, USA, 30 October–1 November 2007.

  4. Hullmann, J.; Diakopoulos, N. Visualization rhetoric: Framing effects in narrative visualization. IEEE Tran. Vis. Com. Gr. 2011, 17, 2231–2240.

  5. Roth, R.E.; Ross, K.S.; MacEachren, A.M. User-centered design for interactive maps: A case study in crime analysis. IJGI 2015, doi:10.3390/ijgi4010262.

Keywords

  • Geovisual storytelling
  • Narrative geovisualization
  • Human-computer interaction and storytelling
  • Space-time data-driven journalism
  • Location-based storytelling
  • Geovisual story telling in education
  • Big geo data dashboards and space-time storytelling
  • Empirical studies, crowd-sourcing, citizen science and engagement

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Article
Comic Strip Narratives in Time Geography
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2018, 7(7), 245; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi7070245 - 22 Jun 2018
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3614
Abstract
On the basis of a shared emphasis on time as well as space, this paper argues for introducing elements of comic art into cartography, specifically the mapped comic, with an illustrated strip literally plotted and placed in a 3D time geographic virtual world. [...] Read more.
On the basis of a shared emphasis on time as well as space, this paper argues for introducing elements of comic art into cartography, specifically the mapped comic, with an illustrated strip literally plotted and placed in a 3D time geographic virtual world. This approach is situated within current initiatives regarding the relationship between cartography and art, given that comics are a type of sequential art. Two examples demonstrate that the approach succeeds as a way of representing the geometry of a story without compromising emotional content. Comic conventions neatly package narrative geography for visual deployment. An example demonstrating the expressiveness of comic art principles when applied to maps (maps as comics) is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storytelling with Geographic Data)
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Article
Mapping Heritage: Geospatial Online Databases of Historic Roads. The Case of the N-340 Roadway Corridor on the Spanish Mediterranean
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2018, 7(4), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi7040134 - 01 Apr 2018
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2225
Abstract
The study has developed an online geospatial database for assessing the complexity of roadway heritage, overcoming the limitations of traditional heritage catalogues and databases: the itemization of heritage assets and the rigidity of the database structure. Reflecting the current openness in the field [...] Read more.
The study has developed an online geospatial database for assessing the complexity of roadway heritage, overcoming the limitations of traditional heritage catalogues and databases: the itemization of heritage assets and the rigidity of the database structure. Reflecting the current openness in the field of heritage studies, the research proposes an interdisciplinary approach that reframes heritage databases, both conceptually and technologically. Territorial scale is key for heritage interpretation, the complex characteristics of each type of heritage, and social appropriation. The system is based on an open-source content-management system and framework called ProcessWire, allowing flexibility in the definition of data fields and serving as an internal working tool for research collaboration. Accessibility, flexibility, and ease of use do not preclude rigor: the database works in conjunction with a GIS (Geographic Information System) support system and is complemented by a bibliographical archive. A hierarchical multiscalar heritage characterization has been implemented in order to include the different territorial scales and to facilitate the creation of itineraries. Having attained the main goals of conceptual heritage coherence, accessibility, and rigor, the database should strive for broader capacity to integrate GIS information and stimulate public participation, a step toward controlled crowdsourcing and collaborative heritage characterization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storytelling with Geographic Data)
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Article
Digital Story Mapping to Advance Educational Atlas Design and Enable Student Engagement
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2018, 7(3), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi7030125 - 19 Mar 2018
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 3579
Abstract
Storytelling is recognized as a valid and important method of communicating information and knowledge gleaned from volumes of ever-accumulating data. Practices of data-driven storytelling in journalism and geovisual analytics have contributed to the development of geovisual stories; also called story maps. The benefits [...] Read more.
Storytelling is recognized as a valid and important method of communicating information and knowledge gleaned from volumes of ever-accumulating data. Practices of data-driven storytelling in journalism and geovisual analytics have contributed to the development of geovisual stories; also called story maps. The benefits of student-focused multi-thematic atlases and digital storytelling methods in education can also be realized in story maps. An online, interactive version of the original paper version of the Wyoming Student Atlas was developed using story mapping technology. Studies on best practices for data-driven storytelling and web map interaction were used to inform the transition of the atlas from a traditional paper format to a collection of story maps. Evaluation of the atlas story maps for educational purposes was conducted by observing students from multiple classrooms as they used the story maps in a lesson. The students and educators responded to a survey after using the story maps. Results of the survey show positive responses to the atlas story maps, including ease of use and preference over a traditional paper atlas. However, certain types of interaction with the map resulted in increased negative or uncertain responses from students concerning their perception of the atlas story maps. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storytelling with Geographic Data)
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Article
Storytelling in Interactive 3D Geographic Visualization Systems
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2018, 7(3), 123; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi7030123 - 19 Mar 2018
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 3815
Abstract
The objective of interactive geographic maps is to provide geographic information to a large audience in a captivating and intuitive way. Storytelling helps to create exciting experiences and to explain complex or otherwise hidden relationships of geospatial data. Furthermore, interactive 3D applications offer [...] Read more.
The objective of interactive geographic maps is to provide geographic information to a large audience in a captivating and intuitive way. Storytelling helps to create exciting experiences and to explain complex or otherwise hidden relationships of geospatial data. Furthermore, interactive 3D applications offer a wide range of attractive elements for advanced visual story creation and offer the possibility to convey the same story in many different ways. In this paper, we discuss and analyze storytelling techniques in 3D geographic visualizations so that authors and developers working with geospatial data can use these techniques to conceptualize their visualization and interaction design. Finally, we outline two examples which apply the given concepts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storytelling with Geographic Data)
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Article
Spatio-Temporal Database of Places Located in the Border Area
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2018, 7(3), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi7030108 - 14 Mar 2018
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2062
Abstract
As a result of changes in boundaries, the political affiliation of locations also changes. Data on such locations are now collected in datasets with reference to the present or to the past space. Therefore, they can refer to localities that either no longer [...] Read more.
As a result of changes in boundaries, the political affiliation of locations also changes. Data on such locations are now collected in datasets with reference to the present or to the past space. Therefore, they can refer to localities that either no longer exist, have a different name now, or lay outside of the current borders of the country. Moreover, thematic data describing the past are related to events, customs, items that are always “somewhere”. Storytelling about the past is incomplete without knowledge about the places in which the given story has happened. Therefore, the objective of the article is to discuss the concept of spatio-temporal database for border areas as an “engine” for visualization of thematic data in time-oriented geographical space. The paper focuses on studying the place names on the Polish-Ukrainian border, analyzing the changes that have occurred in this area over the past 80 years (where there were three different countries during this period), and defining the changeability rules. As a result of the research, the architecture of spatio-temporal databases is defined, as well as the rules for using them for data geovisualisation in historical context. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storytelling with Geographic Data)
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Article
On the Use of Geographic Information in Humanities Research Infrastructure: A Case Study on Cultural Heritage
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2018, 7(3), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi7030106 - 14 Mar 2018
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2239
Abstract
As an invaluable source of knowledge about the past, cultural heritage may be an important element of the humanities research infrastructure, along with other elements, such as spatial references. Therefore, this paper attempts to provide an answer to the questions concerning the ways [...] Read more.
As an invaluable source of knowledge about the past, cultural heritage may be an important element of the humanities research infrastructure, along with other elements, such as spatial references. Therefore, this paper attempts to provide an answer to the questions concerning the ways in which spatial information can contribute to the development of this infrastructure and the aspects of storytelling based on cultural resources that can be supported by such infrastructure. The objective of the methodology that was used was to combine the aspects that refer to spatial information and cultural items into a single, common issue, and to describe them in a formalized way with use of Unified Modeling Language (UML). As a result, the study presents a proposal of the Humanities Infrastructure Architecture based on spatially-oriented movable cultural items, taking into account their use in the context of interoperability, along with the concept of creating spatial databases that would include movable monuments. The authors also demonstrate that the ISO 19100 series of geographical information standards may be a source of interesting conceptual solutions that may be used in the process of the standardization of geographical information that was recorded in the descriptions of cultural heritage items in form of metadata and data structure descriptions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storytelling with Geographic Data)
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Concept Paper
Once upon a Spacetime: Visual Storytelling in Cognitive and Geotemporal Information Spaces
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2018, 7(3), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi7030096 - 12 Mar 2018
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3881
Abstract
Stories are an essential mode, not only of human communication—but also of thinking. This paper reflects on the internalization of stories from a cognitive perspective and outlines a visualization framework for supporting the analysis of narrative geotemporal data. We discuss the strengths and [...] Read more.
Stories are an essential mode, not only of human communication—but also of thinking. This paper reflects on the internalization of stories from a cognitive perspective and outlines a visualization framework for supporting the analysis of narrative geotemporal data. We discuss the strengths and limitations of standard techniques for representing spatiotemporal data (coordinated views, animation or slideshow, layer superimposition, juxtaposition, and space-time cube representation) and think about their effects on mental representations of a story. Many current visualization systems offer multiple views and allow the user to investigate different aspects of a story. From a cognitive point of view, it is important to assist users in reconnecting these multiple perspectives into a coherent picture—e.g., by utilizing coherence techniques like seamless transitions. A case study involving visualizing biographical narratives illustrates how the design of advanced visualization systems can be cognitively and conceptually grounded to support the construction of an integrated internal representation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storytelling with Geographic Data)
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