ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Workplace Health (Violence, Injury, and Stress) in the Health Care Setting

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 17443

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Economics, Unversitas Mercatorum, 00186 Rome, Italy
Interests: epidemiology; public health; occupational medicine; health economics; health management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on the epidemiology and prevention of workplace health in the health care setting in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information about the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph. 

Workplace health promotion (WHP) has become a significant issue worldwide. Our main interest is on presenting a wide experience of epidemiological studies, as well as best practices concerning violence, injury, and stress in the health care sector.

Violence against Hospital health care worker (HCW) is an important issue during interactions with patients, their relatives or companions, and many authors recognize the phenomenon of violence at work is a specific risk factor predicting stress and possible stress-related pathologies in the health care sector.

On the other side, injuries among HCWs are a common occurrence, and there is a large space for improving the consequences of biological, chemical, and physical risk factors.

The Special Issue is open to contributions that focus on the aforementioned topics, as well as those that can present examples of stress management activities for HCWs, including (but not limited to) yoga, mindfulness, and tai-chi.

Prof. Dr. Giuseppe La Torre
Dr. Alice Mannocci
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • workplace health
  • violence
  • injury
  • work-related stress
  • burnout
  • health care professionals

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

14 pages, 394 KiB  
Article
Violence in the Nursing Workplace in the Context of Primary Health Care: A Qualitative Study
by Kisa Valladão Carvalho, Priscila Norié de Araujo, Felipe Lima dos Santos, Poliana Silva de Oliveira, Janaina Pereira da Silva, Karen da Silva Santos, Angelina Lettiere Viana and Cinira Magali Fortuna
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(17), 6693; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20176693 - 31 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1543
Abstract
Violence demands considerable attention due to its complexity and social consequences. The objective of this study was to analyze violence in the nursing professional workplace in the context of primary health care in Brazil. It is a qualitative study with theoretical and methodological [...] Read more.
Violence demands considerable attention due to its complexity and social consequences. The objective of this study was to analyze violence in the nursing professional workplace in the context of primary health care in Brazil. It is a qualitative study with theoretical and methodological reference to institutional analysis. It was carried out in basic health units in Brazil. Nursing professionals (N = 11) participated in semi-structured interviews and discussion groups, in addition to a research diary and participant observation. Data collection took place from October to December 2021. The results are presented in five categories: types of violence and aggressors from the perspective of nursing professionals; the causes of violence reported by professionals; strategies for the management of violence; professionals’ proposals for preventing violence in health contexts; the consequences of violence in the workplace. Nursing professionals make up a large part of the workforce and have reported verbal, physical, moral, and psychological violence. The main causes are associated with user access to services. For the prevention of violence, professionals do not see themselves as protagonists of change. The consequences are the loss of quality of work and the health of professionals who requested sick leave and transfers. The study’s findings can help in the development of public policies and educational and management actions. Full article
13 pages, 594 KiB  
Article
Workplace Bullying among Healthcare Professionals: A Quanti-Qualitative Survey in a Sample of Women Working in an Italian Healthcare Setting
by Daniela Acquadro Maran, Davide Minniti, Michele Presutti, Marta Alesina, Adelina Brizio and Paola Gatti
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(10), 5859; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20105859 - 18 May 2023
Viewed by 1963
Abstract
The main objective of this study was to analyze, in a sample of female healthcare workers in Italy, the training needs to improve positive relationships in the healthcare organization. To better understand these needs, perceived workplace bullying and its consequences in terms of [...] Read more.
The main objective of this study was to analyze, in a sample of female healthcare workers in Italy, the training needs to improve positive relationships in the healthcare organization. To better understand these needs, perceived workplace bullying and its consequences in terms of professional commitment and well-being were analyzed from a descriptive and quantitative perspective (or mixed-methods analysis). A questionnaire was completed online in a healthcare facility in northwestern Italy. The participants were 231 female employees. The quantitative data showed that, on average, the sampled population perceived a low burden of WPB. The majority of the sample expressed moderate engagement at work and moderate perception of psychological well-being. It is interesting to note that one element seemed to be overarching in the responses to the open-ended questions: communication, which emerged as a problematic element that affects the entire organization. The research data provide useful evidence for intervention in favor of an environment that helps to recognize the phenomenon and intervene in time, offering the possibility of accepting the discomfort and fatigue of healthcare workers and offering useful interventions to the individual and the team. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 340 KiB  
Article
The Management of Workplace Violence against Healthcare Workers: A Multidisciplinary Team for Total Worker Health® Approach in a Hospital
by Reparata Rosa Di Prinzio, Giorgia Bondanini, Federica De Falco, Maria Rosaria Vinci, Vincenzo Camisa, Annapaola Santoro, Marcello De Santis, Massimiliano Raponi, Guendalina Dalmasso and Salvatore Zaffina
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(1), 196; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010196 - 23 Dec 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3441
Abstract
The risk of aggression against healthcare workers (HCWs) is a globally well-known topic. However, workplace violence (WV) is often considered as part of HCW’s job, leading to a general underreporting. This cross-sectional study aims at providing a descriptive analysis of aggressive acts against [...] Read more.
The risk of aggression against healthcare workers (HCWs) is a globally well-known topic. However, workplace violence (WV) is often considered as part of HCW’s job, leading to a general underreporting. This cross-sectional study aims at providing a descriptive analysis of aggressive acts against HCWs registered in a 34-month period in a pediatric hospital. According to a specific protocol, each aggressive act was analyzed by a multidisciplinary team using the “Modified Overt Aggression Scale” (MOAS), the “General Health Questionnaire-12” (GHQ-12), and the “Short Form-36 Health Survey” (SF-36) to build a report addressing improvement measures. A three-domain model of WV was also developed considering: (1) assaulted HCWs, (2) attacker-related issues, and (3) environmental context. Contributing factors to overt aggression were outlined and tested using univariate analyses. Statistically significant factors were then included in a multiple linear regression model. A total of 82 aggressive acts were registered in the period. MOAS scores registered a mean value of 3.71 (SD: 4.09). Verbal abuse was the most common form of WV. HCWs professional category, minor psychiatric disorder, emotional role limitation, type of containment used, and emotion intensity were significantly associated with overt aggression (p < 0.05), as well as the attacker’s role in the hospital (p < 0.05). The multiple regression analysis confirmed these findings (p < 0.001). Raising awareness on the aggression risk and contributing factors may lead to a relevant improvement of workplace environment, individual workers’ health, and organizational well-being. Full article
8 pages, 455 KiB  
Article
Tai Chi and Workplace Wellness for Health Care Workers: A Systematic Review
by Rosario Andrea Cocchiara, Barbara Dorelli, Shima Gholamalishahi, William Longo, Emiliano Musumeci, Alice Mannocci and Giuseppe La Torre
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 343; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010343 - 3 Jan 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 5313
Abstract
Several studies show the positive effects of new non-medical therapies known as complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs). In this context, the discipline of tai chi is obtaining a wider consensus because of its many beneficial effects both on the human body and mind. [...] Read more.
Several studies show the positive effects of new non-medical therapies known as complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs). In this context, the discipline of tai chi is obtaining a wider consensus because of its many beneficial effects both on the human body and mind. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of the scientific literature concerning the relationship between tai chi practice and wellness of health care workers (HCW) in their professional setting. The research was performed in September 2019, investigating the databases Cinahl, Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed. Full-text articles, written in English language and published after 1995, were taken into account. No restrictions regarding the study design were applied. A quality assessment was developed using AMSTAR, Jadad, Newcastle–Ottawa Scale, INSA, and CASE REPORT scale. Six papers were finally included: Three clinical trials, one observational study, one systematic review, and one case report. The methodological quality of the included studies was judged as medium level. In conclusion, this systematic review suggests the potential impact of interventions such as tai chi as tools for reducing work-related stress among healthcare professionals. Further research will be needed in order to gain robust evidence of its efficacy. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 2402 KiB  
Article
Exploring Perceptions of the Work Environment among Psychiatric Nursing Staff in France: A Qualitative Study Using Hierarchical Clustering Methods
by Baptiste Cougot, Ghozlane Fleury-Bahi, Jules Gauvin, Anne Armant, Paolo Durando, Guglielmo Dini, Nicolas Gillet, Leila Moret and Dominique Tripodi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 142; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010142 - 24 Dec 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3815
Abstract
Most studies on workers’ health are based on non-specific models of occupational stress, thereby limiting the understanding and research on efficient interventions. This qualitative approach aimed to explore the structure of resources and constraints in the working environment of nurses in a deliberately [...] Read more.
Most studies on workers’ health are based on non-specific models of occupational stress, thereby limiting the understanding and research on efficient interventions. This qualitative approach aimed to explore the structure of resources and constraints in the working environment of nurses in a deliberately open approach. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 37 nurses working in closed and open inpatient psychiatric wards in a French university hospital. The data were statistically analyzed using a hierarchical clustering method. Our model highlighted a systemic structure, describing the interactions, including patients, nurses, doctors, and managers in a specific material, communicational, and organizational environment. The results show a discursive structure organized around dimensions pertaining to “environment”, “patients”, “medical-care group”, and “the individual”. Our model showed interest in an interdisciplinary approach that encompasses occupational medicine and social psychology. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop