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Physical Activity Interventions for Healthy Ageing and Fall Prevention

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health-Related Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 9486

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Sport, Catholic University of Murcia (UCAM), 30107 Murcia, Spain
Interests: near-infrared spectroscopy; mitochondria; resistance training; healthy aging; physical activity for health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Sport, Catholic University of Murcia (UCAM), 30107 Murcia, Spain
Interests: muscle strength; elderly; physical performance; interventions; exercise program
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Human aging is a universal and inevitable phenomenon. As in the earlier stages, a range of physical, psychological and social changes occur. Aging plays an important role in the alterations observed in elderly organisms, but we do not know in what proportion, since inactivity is a fact consubstantial with aging. Over the years, physical activity not only decreases in intensity but also in duration, which translates into increasing difficulty in coping with daily tasks and, ultimately, a deterioration in quality of life.

This physical inactivity is a key risk factor for increased mortality, morbidity, and functional disability in the elderly. Regular physical exercise is essential for the quality of life of older people, reducing the need for assistance and increasing their independence to carry out everyday tasks without the risk of falling. Therefore, this Special Issue aims to highlight the latest evidence on the potential health benefits of physical activity in the elderly population, and encourages submissions of original articles, reviews and short communications that specifically address physical activity and/or the underlying causes and mechanisms of the prevention of falls in this population. Due to the breadth of the topic, contributions from many disciplines such as epidemiology, biomechanics, physiology, psychology and social sciences are expected. Contributions on these topics are welcome, particularly those that combine high academic standards with a sound approach to addressing the physical activity needs of older people.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Healthcare.

Dr. Salvador Romero-Arenas
Dr. Fernanda Borges-Silva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • older adults
  • daily physical activity
  • well-being
  • balance
  • postural control
  • gait analysis
  • exercise prescription
  • strength and conditioning
  • multicomponent
  • Tai Chi
  • yoga
  • exercise physiology
  • exercise therapy
  • wearables
  • sensors
  • virtual reality

Published Papers (4 papers)

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12 pages, 364 KiB  
Article
Limitations in Activities of Daily Living among Older Adults with COPD, Asthma, or Asthma-COPD Overlap Residing in Spain
by Sheila Sánchez Castillo, Lee Smith, Arturo Díaz Suárez and Guillermo Felipe López Sánchez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 3467; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20043467 - 16 Feb 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1712
Abstract
Activities of daily living (ADL) may be limited by the presence of chronic diseases, and limitations in ADL contribute to an increased risk of falling. In people with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and asthma–COPD overlap (ACO), ADL may be affected owing [...] Read more.
Activities of daily living (ADL) may be limited by the presence of chronic diseases, and limitations in ADL contribute to an increased risk of falling. In people with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and asthma–COPD overlap (ACO), ADL may be affected owing to poor asthma control and COPD ventilatory limitations. The aim of this study was to establish the differing prevalence of limitations in ADL among older Spanish adults with chronic respiratory diseases (COPD, asthma, and ACO). Data from the Spanish National Health Survey were analyzed. The sample was composed of 944 older adults aged ≥65 years and with a positive diagnosis of COPD (n = 502), asthma (n = 241), or ACO (n = 201). Five basic activities of daily living (BADL) and seven instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) were studied. Frequency and percentages were used to describe sample characteristics and limitations of ADL. Significant differences were analyzed using chi-square tests. Results revealed a significant higher number of older adults with COPD (34.8%) and asthma (32.5%) without limitations in doing hard housework in comparison to ACO (17.8%). Regarding meal preparation, a higher percentage of asthmatics without difficulties (77.7%) and a lower percentage with many difficulties (2.6%) were observed in comparison to ACO (64.8%–10.2%). No differences were found in BADL, with approximately 80–90% without limitations. It seems that limitations in IADL vary according to the type of chronic pulmonary diseases, but further research is needed to clarify why differences were found only for preparing meals and hard housework. These findings should be considered in the design of interventions to promote ADL in older adults with respiratory disease. Full article
13 pages, 400 KiB  
Article
Associations of Gait Speed, Cadence, Gait Stability Ratio, and Body Balance with Falls in Older Adults
by Marcelo de Maio Nascimento, Élvio Rúbio Gouveia, Bruna R. Gouveia, Adilson Marques, Francisco Martins, Krzysztof Przednowek, Cíntia França, Miguel Peralta and Andreas Ihle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 13926; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192113926 - 26 Oct 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2222
Abstract
To investigate the association between gait speed (GS), cadence (CAD), gait stability ratio (GSR), and body balance (BB) with falls in a large sample of older adults. The analysis included 619 individuals—305 men and 314 women (69.50 ± 5.62 years)—residing in the Autonomous [...] Read more.
To investigate the association between gait speed (GS), cadence (CAD), gait stability ratio (GSR), and body balance (BB) with falls in a large sample of older adults. The analysis included 619 individuals—305 men and 314 women (69.50 ± 5.62 years)—residing in the Autonomous Region of Madeira, Portugal. Mobility in GS, CAD, and GSR was assessed using the 50-foot walk test and BB by the Fullerton Advanced Balance scale. The frequency of falls was obtained by self-report. Linear regression analysis showed that higher performance in GS and BB was able to reduce the risk of falling by up to 0.34 and 0.44 times, respectively. An increase in the GSR value enhanced the risk of falling by up to 0.10 times. Multinomial analysis indicated that, in relation to the highest tertile (reference), older adults classified with GS and BB performance in the lowest tertile (lowest) had an increased chance (OR) of falling by up to 149.3% and 48.8%, respectively. Moreover, in relation to the highest tertile, the performance of the GSR classified in the lowest and medium tercile showed an increase in the chance of falling by up to 57.4% and 56.4%, respectively. Full article
14 pages, 834 KiB  
Article
Association between Fall History and Gait, Balance, Physical Activity, Depression, Fear of Falling, and Motor Capacity: A 6-Month Follow-Up Study
by Catherine Park, Md Moin Uddin Atique, Ramkinker Mishra and Bijan Najafi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(17), 10785; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191710785 - 30 Aug 2022
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2158
Abstract
Maintaining function in older adults is key to the quality of life and longevity. This study examined the potential impact of falls on accelerating further deterioration over time in gait, balance, physical activity, depression, fear of falling, and motor capacity in older adults. [...] Read more.
Maintaining function in older adults is key to the quality of life and longevity. This study examined the potential impact of falls on accelerating further deterioration over time in gait, balance, physical activity, depression, fear of falling, and motor capacity in older adults. 163 ambulatory older adults (age = 76.5 ± 7.7 years) participated and were followed for 6 months. They were classified into fallers or non-fallers based on a history of falling within the past year. At baseline and 6 months, all participants were objectively assessed for gait, balance, and physical activity using wearable sensors. Additional assessments included psychosocial concerns (depression and fear of falling) and motor capacity (Timed Up and Go test). The fallers showed lower gait performance, less physical activity, lower depression level, higher fear of falling, and less motor capacity than non-fallers at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Results also revealed acceleration in physical activity and motor capacity decline compared to non-fallers at a 6-month follow-up. Our findings suggest that falls would accelerate deterioration in both physical activity and motor performance and highlight the need for effective therapy to reduce the consequences of falls in older adults. Full article
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16 pages, 416 KiB  
Study Protocol
Cost-Effectiveness of the Comprehensive Interdisciplinary Program-Care in Informal Caregivers of People with Alzheimer’s Disease
by Laura Muñoz-Bermejo, María José González-Becerra, Sabina Barrios-Fernández, Salvador Postigo-Mota, María del Rocío Jerez-Barroso, Juan Agustín Franco Martínez, Belén Suárez-Lantarón, Diego Muñoz Marín, Nieves Martín-Bermúdez, Raquel Ortés-Gómez, Martín Gómez-Ullate-García de León, Marta Martínez-Acevedo, Lara Rocha-Gómez, Sara Espejo-Antúnez, Mercedes Fraile-Bravo, María Gloria Solís Galán, Ignacio Chato-Gonzalo, Francisco Javier Domínguez Muñoz, Miguel Ángel Hernández-Mocholí, Miguel Madruga-Vicente, Angelina Prado-Solano, María Mendoza-Muñoz, Jorge Carlos-Vivas, Jorge Pérez-Gómez, Raquel Pastor-Cisneros, Paulina Fuentes-Flores, Damián Pereira-Payo, Javier De Los Ríos-Calonge, Javier Urbano-Mairena, Joan Guerra-Bustamante and José Carmelo Adsuaradd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 15243; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192215243 - 18 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2627
Abstract
People with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) diagnosis who get informal care remain at home longer, reducing the demand for healthcare resources but increasing the stress of caregiving. Research on the effectiveness of physical training, psychoeducational, cognitive–behavioural, and health education programs in reducing the caregiver [...] Read more.
People with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) diagnosis who get informal care remain at home longer, reducing the demand for healthcare resources but increasing the stress of caregiving. Research on the effectiveness of physical training, psychoeducational, cognitive–behavioural, and health education programs in reducing the caregiver load and enhancing health-related quality of life (HRQoL) exist, but none exist about an integrated interdisciplinary program. The goals of this project are (1) to assess the Integral-CARE Interdisciplinary Program (IP) applicability, safety, effects on HRQoL, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for AD caregivers; (2) to evaluate the IP applicability and cost-effectiveness to enhance the physical, psychoemotional, cognitive–behavioural dimensions, and the health education status of informal caregivers, and (3) to study the transference of the results to the public and private sectors. A randomized controlled trial will be conducted with an experimental (IP) and a control group (no intervention). The PI will be conducted over nine months using face-to-face sessions (twice a week) and virtual sessions on an online platform (once a week). There will be an initial, interim (every three months), and final assessment. Focus groups with social and health agents will be organized to determine the most important information to convey to the public and private sectors in Extremadura (Spain). Applicability, safety, HRQoL, incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, and HRQoL will be the main outcome measures, while secondary measures will include sociodemographic data; physical, psychoemotional, health education, and cognitive–behavioural domains; program adherence; and patient health status. Data will be examined per procedure and intention to treat. A cost-effectiveness study will also be performed from the viewpoints of private and public healthcare resources. Full article
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