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One Health including and beyond Zoonoses

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Infectious Diseases, Chronic Diseases, and Disease Prevention".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 21 December 2024 | Viewed by 4766

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada
2. British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Provincial Health Services Authority, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4R4, Canada
Interests: non-communicable diseases; population health and wellbeing; community health; public health; One Health; global health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Zoonotic infectious agents causing morbidities and mortalities are abundant both in animals and humans. In the broader context of the ‘One Health’ approach that encompasses the human–animal–environmental health triad, there are numerous systemic-level nexus interactions requiring multiple disciplines of scientific inquiry. There is a need to prioritize strategic prevention, management and control of prevalent and emerging zoonoses, including communicable diseases affecting both humans and animals across jurisdictions around the world on a wide scale, from one-on-one transmission to pandemics. Several impacts on the health and wellbeing of people and animals and their environment also require attention, especially considering the increasing climate change threats affecting the balance of this triad. These aspects have enormous common ground with respect to scientific knowledge and their cross-disciplinary interactions and strategic 'collective' role in combating the ever-increasing burden of obesity and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the ageing human population and enhancement of the animal–human–environment 'triad' relationship that is conducive to creating healthy living systems supporting the planet’s sustainability. Recently, a small but increasing interest in exploring One Health issues beyond zoonoses has emerged in the scientific community.

This Special Issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on One Health in the broader context, from zoonoses and beyond, with the aim of collecting multidisciplinary knowledge and innovative ideas in the field. New systematic/scoping reviews, research articles, case reports and conference papers are welcome. Papers dealing with policy formation and innovative approaches to widening the scope of One Health aimed at achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are also welcome. Other manuscript types accepted include methodological papers, position papers, policy brief reports and commentaries.

This Special Issue prioritizes zoonoses, while still exploring other multidisciplinary aspects beyond zoonoses, to comprehensively cover zoonotic and non-zoonotic components of the animal–human–environmental health relationship.

We welcome manuscripts from different disciplines, including medicine and public health, veterinary medicine and public health, environmental health, genomics, epidemiology, policy analysis and implementation science. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Prioritization of control of zoonoses in One Health approach;
  • Genomics in One Health
  • One Health and non-communicable disease/conditions in humans and animals;
  • One Health and planetary health/ climate change;
  • One Health and the Sustainable Development Goals;
  • Policy framework for global/regional/national/sub-national programs of One Health;
  • One Health education and curriculum development in high-income and low-to-middle-income countries;
  • One Health and health inequity;
  • One Health approach to food security and safety;
  • One Health for animal welfare and human wellbeing.

Dr. Drona P. Rasali
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • One Health and SDGs
  • zoonoses
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • non-zoonotic conditions
  • planetary health
  • animal–human–environment triad
  • One Health and health equity
  • One Health education
  • One Health policy
  • One Welfare/wellbeing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 1642 KiB  
Article
One Health and Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities: A One Health Pilot Study
by Tamara Riley, Bonny Cumming, Joanne Thandrayen, Anna Meredith, Neil E. Anderson and Raymond Lovett
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(14), 6416; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20146416 - 20 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1776
Abstract
Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities face barriers in accessing animal healthcare and are exposed to disproportionate environmental health exposures leading to increased risk of disease. A One Health approach has been promoted to address public health risks and improve human, animal, [...] Read more.
Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities face barriers in accessing animal healthcare and are exposed to disproportionate environmental health exposures leading to increased risk of disease. A One Health approach has been promoted to address public health risks and improve human, animal, and environmental health outcomes in communities. We undertook a pilot One Health study in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Queensland collecting animal, human, and environmental health data from 82 households. We performed a descriptive analysis and assessed the association between human and environmental health exposures and animal health outcomes. Most households were not crowded (82.9%) but did report a high level of environmental health concerns (86.6%). The majority of households owned cats and dogs (81.7%), with most animals assessed as healthy. There was no association between human and environmental health exposures and animal health outcomes. As most households experienced concerns regarding housing conditions, environmental health programs should prioritise improving household factors. There was also strong support for animal healthcare (including access to medicines and veterinarians, education programs and population management), indicating that a One Health approach is desired by communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue One Health including and beyond Zoonoses)
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11 pages, 1449 KiB  
Article
Hands off the Mink! Using Environmental Sampling for SARS-CoV-2 Surveillance in American Mink
by Ellen Boyd, Michelle Coombe, Natalie Prystajecky, Jessica M. Caleta, Inna Sekirov, John Tyson and Chelsea Himsworth
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 1248; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20021248 - 10 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1856
Abstract
Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, numerous non-human species were shown to be susceptible to natural infection by SARS-CoV-2, including farmed American mink. Once infected, American mink can transfer the virus from mink to human and mink to mink, resulting in a high rate of [...] Read more.
Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, numerous non-human species were shown to be susceptible to natural infection by SARS-CoV-2, including farmed American mink. Once infected, American mink can transfer the virus from mink to human and mink to mink, resulting in a high rate of viral mutation. Therefore, outbreak surveillance on American mink farms is imperative for both mink and human health. Historically, disease surveillance on mink farms has consisted of a combination of mortality and live animal sampling; however, these methodologies have significant limitations. This study compared PCR testing of both deceased and live animal samples to environmental samples on an active outbreak premise, to determine the utility of environmental sampling. Environmental sampling mirrored trends in both deceased and live animal sampling in terms of percent positivity and appeared more sensitive in some low-prevalence instances. PCR CT values of environmental samples were significantly different from live animal samples’ CT values and were consistently high (mean CT = 36.2), likely indicating a low amount of viral RNA in the samples. There is compelling evidence in favour of environmental sampling for the purpose of disease surveillance, specifically as an early warning tool for SARS-CoV-2; however, further work is needed to ultimately determine whether environmental samples are viable sources for molecular epidemiology investigations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue One Health including and beyond Zoonoses)
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