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Epidemiology of Lifestyle-Related Diseases

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Infectious Diseases, Chronic Diseases, and Disease Prevention".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 March 2025 | Viewed by 2803

Special Issue Editor

Cancer Epidemiology Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
Interests: biostatistics; epidemiology; cardiology; cancer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes and chronic respiratory disease, are still posing a great threat to both the health of human beings and the health systems. These diseases are heavily associated with modifiable lifestyle factors, including smoking, physical activity, dietary pattern and alcohol consumption. Although many studies have examined the associations between lifestyle factors and NCDs, quite a few issues on this broad topic are to be addressed.

Here are some examples of topics that could be addressed in this Special Issue: 

  1. The individual and combined effects of lifestyle factors on NCDs;
  2. The short-term and long-term associations and contributions of lifestyle factors to NCDs;
  3. The temporal trends on the associations and contributions between lifestyle factors and NCDs;
  4. The contributions of lifestyle factors on the demographic and socioeconomic inequalities in NCD risk;
  5. The lifestyle modifications following an NCD and patients’ prognosis;
  6. Distribution of lifestyle factors. 

Dr. Yang Peng
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • epidemiology
  • lifestyle factors
  • cardiovascular disease
  • cancer
  • diabetes
  • chronic respiratory disease
  • longitudinal studies
  • cross-sectional studies
  • prognosis
  • incidence

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 371 KiB  
Article
Prevalence and Psychosocial Correlates of Diabetes Mellitus in South Africa: Results from the South African National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (SANHANES-1)
by Sibusiso Sifunda, Anthony David Mbewu, Musawenkosi Mabaso, Thabang Manyaapelo, Ronel Sewpaul, Justin Winston Morgan, Nigel Walsh Harriman, David R. Williams and Sasiragha Priscilla Reddy
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(10), 5798; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20105798 - 12 May 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2268
Abstract
In South Africa, there are a limited number of population estimates of the prevalence of diabetes and its association with psychosocial factors. This study investigates the prevalence of diabetes and its psychosocial correlates in both the general South African population and the Black [...] Read more.
In South Africa, there are a limited number of population estimates of the prevalence of diabetes and its association with psychosocial factors. This study investigates the prevalence of diabetes and its psychosocial correlates in both the general South African population and the Black South African subpopulation using data from the SANHANES-1. Diabetes was defined as a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥6.5% or currently on diabetes treatment. Multivariate ordinary least squares and logistic regression models were used to determine factors associated with HbA1c and diabetes, respectively. The prevalence of diabetes was significantly higher among participants who identified as Indian, followed by White and Coloured people, and lowest among Black South Africans. General population models indicated that being Indian, older aged, having a family history of diabetes, and being overweight and obese were associated with HbA1c and diabetes, and crowding was inversely associated with HbA1c and diabetes. HbA1c was inversely associated with being White, having higher education, and residing in areas with higher levels of neighborhood crime and alcohol use. Diabetes was positively associated with psychological distress. The study highlights the importance of addressing the risk factors of psychological distress, as well as traditional risk factors and social determinants of diabetes, in the prevention and control of diabetes at individual and population levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology of Lifestyle-Related Diseases)
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