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Special Issue "Innovations for Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation in Sport and Physical Activity"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Sport and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2023 | Viewed by 2699

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Kam-Ming Mok
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Office of Student Affairs, Lingnan University, Hong Kong
2. Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Interests: sports biomechanic; injury prevention; sports rehabilitation; biomedical engineering
Dr. Xin He
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
Interests: sports rehabilitation; sports biomechanics; injury prevention; ultrasound image

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The advancement of injury prevention and rehabilitation in sports and physical activity will provide a safer and more pleasant arena for both professional and recreational athletes to enjoy. Innovations in development and application are based on evidence and technology, such as the use of small wearable devices that can access movement quality and detect risky motions. Recently, the use of big data has been shown to systematically analyze a large volume of data to provide trend prediction and health screening. There could be even more such breakthroughs if there is good exchange of knowledge between biomechanical engineering, sports technology, pedagogy in physical education, etc. This Special Issue aims to attract new ideas that could spark more discussion on innovations for injury prevention and rehabilitation in sport and physical activity.

Dr. Kam-Ming Mok
Dr. Xin He
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • injury prevention
  • injury mechanism
  • motion analysis
  • rehabilitation
  • physical wellness

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Effects of Aquatic versus Land High-Intensity Interval Training on Acute Cardiometabolic and Perceptive Responses in Healthy Young Women
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(24), 16761; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192416761 - 14 Dec 2022
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Abstract
The effects of aquatic high-intensity interval training (AHIIT) on cardiometabolic and perceptive responses when compared to similar land-based exercise (LHIIT) remain unknown. Here, we aimed to (1) establish a matched intensity between mediums and (2) compare the acute cardiometabolic and perceptive responses to [...] Read more.
The effects of aquatic high-intensity interval training (AHIIT) on cardiometabolic and perceptive responses when compared to similar land-based exercise (LHIIT) remain unknown. Here, we aimed to (1) establish a matched intensity between mediums and (2) compare the acute cardiometabolic and perceptive responses to the two interventions in healthy young women. Twenty healthy young women performed a stationary running exercise at a matched exercise intensity. The incremental stages, in terms of percentage of heart rate (HR), maximal oxygen uptake (%VO2max), percentage of oxygen uptake reserve (%VO2R), percentage of heart rate reserve (%HRR), and rate of perceived exertion (RPE), were examined and acute cardiometabolic and perceptive responses were evaluated. The results showed that HR was significantly reduced (AHIIT: W 150 ± 19, R 140 ± 18, LHIIT: W 167 ± 16, R 158 ± 16 p < 0.01) and oxygen pulse (AHIIT: W 12 ± 2, R 10 ± 2, LHIIT: W 11 ± 2, R 9 ± 2 p < 0.05) was significantly increased with AHIIT compared to LHIIT. No significant group differences were observed for the perceptive responses. The comparable results demonstrated by the aquatic and land incremental tests allow precise AHIIT and LHIIT prescriptions. AHIIT had distinct differences in HR and oxygen pulse, despite having no distinct difference from LHIIT for some cardiometabolic and affective responses. Full article
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Review

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Review
Effectiveness of Deep Water Running on Improving Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Physical Function and Quality of Life: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9434; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159434 - 01 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 895
Abstract
Deep Water Running (DWR) is a form of aquatic aerobic exercise simulating the running patterns adopted on dry land. Little is known on the effectiveness of DWR despite gaining popularity. The objective of this study is to systematically review the effects of DWR [...] Read more.
Deep Water Running (DWR) is a form of aquatic aerobic exercise simulating the running patterns adopted on dry land. Little is known on the effectiveness of DWR despite gaining popularity. The objective of this study is to systematically review the effects of DWR on cardiorespiratory fitness, physical function, and quality of life in healthy and clinical populations. A systematic search was completed using six databases, including SPORTDiscus, MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, Embase, and The Cochrane Library, up to February 2022. Eleven studies evaluating the effectiveness of DWR on cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), physical function, or quality of life (QoL), compared with no interventions (or standard treatment) or land-based trainings were identified. Data relevant to the review questions were extracted by two independent reviewers when means and standard deviations were reported, and standardized mean differences were calculated. A quality assessment was conducted using selected items from the Downs and Black checklist. A total of 11 clinical trials (7 randomized controlled trials) with a total of 287 participants were included. Meta-analyses were not completed due to the high level of clinical and statistical heterogeneity between studies. Compared with land-based training, DWR showed similar effects on CRF with limited studies reporting outcomes of physical function and QoL compared with the no-exercise control group. DWR appears to be comparable to land-based training for improving CRF. The aquatic environment may provide some advantages for off-loaded exercise at high intensity in populations that are weak, injured or in pain, but more studies are required. Full article
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Other

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Systematic Review
Gait Pathology in Subjects with Patellofemoral Instability: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(17), 10491; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191710491 - 23 Aug 2022
Viewed by 708
Abstract
Identifying potential gait deviations in patellofemoral instability (PI) can help with the development of effective rehabilitation strategies. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine whether there are specific gait alterations in subjects with PI. The present review followed the PRISMA guidelines [...] Read more.
Identifying potential gait deviations in patellofemoral instability (PI) can help with the development of effective rehabilitation strategies. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine whether there are specific gait alterations in subjects with PI. The present review followed the PRISMA guidelines and was initially registered at PROSPERO (CRD42021236765). The literature search was carried out in the databases of PubMed, the Cochrane library, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Medline. The search strategy resulted in the identification of seven relevant publications. Subjects with PI show decreased walking speed, stride length, and cadence. Some studies reported changes not only in knee kinematics and kinetics but also in hip and ankle kinematics and kinetics. There is evidence that most subjects with PI walk with a quadriceps avoidance gait and show increased genu valgum posture, but there is still great variability in the coping responses within individuals with PI. The discrepancy among the study results might underpin the fact that PI is a multifactorial problem, and subjects cope with the different underlying morphological as well as functional deficits using a variety of gait strategies, which makes the interpretation and understanding of the gait of subjects with PI a clinically challenging task. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Innovations for Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation in Sport and Physical Activity
Authors: Kam Ming Mok (ORT)
Affiliation: Lingnan University and The Chinese University of Hong Kong and 

Title: Will dominant side injury affect limb symmetry in knee kinematics during stair descending and single leg hop landing following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction?
Authors: Michael Tim-Yun Ong; Matthew Chun Sing Chow; Xin HE; Jihong Qiu; Zuru Liang; Sai-Chuen Fu; Patrick Shu-Hang Yung
Affiliation:  Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong 

Title: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention Training In Athletes: A Systematic Review Of Current Evidence On Secondary Injury Prevention
Authors: WONG Choi-Yan, YUNG, Shu-Hang Patrick, MOK Kam-Ming
Affiliation: Lingnan University, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

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