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Healthy School in COVID-19: Health Promotion Issues and Challenges

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 March 2024 | Viewed by 2170

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Patrick W. C. Lau
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sport & Physical Education, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong, China
Interests: physical activity and behavioral modification; childhood obesity intervention
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
National Physical Fitness Research Center, China Institte of Sport Science, Beijing 100061, China
Interests: physical activity; physical fitness; health promotion
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Children’s physical, mental and social health has been a worrying problem in recent decades. The COVID-19 pandemic produces extra difficulties to this problem, such as sport parks/playgrounds closing and social distancing measures. According to recent studies related to the impact of COVID-19 on children’s physical activity (PA), physical fitness (PF), and sedentary behaviors (SB), environmental restrictions have induced negative health outcomes to children’s lifestyle and daily activities including less outdoor PA time, declining PF, higher screen time, poorer sleeping, higher rate of myopia and obesity, etc.

School could be the most ideal venue to provide a safe, resourceful, and organized environment for children’s growth and development under the new normal once schools open for children’s regular activities. Some studies have been suggested to employ different forms of interventions and modern technology to support physical education and promote extracurricular school activities to tackle the pandemic barriers in children’s PA behavior. The investigation of how to promote PA and tackle challenges in school during the pandemic will have significant and long-term influence on promoting children’s PA, PF, SB, and overall health.

To provide better guidelines for health promotion and intervention research on school children’s PA, PF, and SB, it is imperative to produce a more evidence-based foundation to tackle challenges. Research based on prospective longitudinal studies, random controlled trials, meta-analyses, intervention methods, and the application of these methods on this topic are invited for this Special Issue.


Prof. Dr. Patrick W. C. Lau
Dr. Jingjing Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • COVID-19 pandemic
  • children’s physical activity
  • children’s physical fitness
  • children’s sedentary behavior
  • healthy school
  • children’s health
  • physical activity promotion

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 832 KiB  
Article
Longitudinal Shifts in Movement Behaviors during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Relations to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among University Students
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(20), 13449; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192013449 - 18 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1577
Abstract
This study examined the longitudinal changes of movement behaviors and their relationships with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among university students during the coronavirus disease 2019 in China. A total of 569 university students completed online surveys twice (Time 1: between December 2020 and [...] Read more.
This study examined the longitudinal changes of movement behaviors and their relationships with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among university students during the coronavirus disease 2019 in China. A total of 569 university students completed online surveys twice (Time 1: between December 2020 and January 2021; Time 2: between November and December 2021). Physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleep duration and quality, as well as PTSD were self-reported. According to Canadian 24-h movement guidelines, the longitudinal shifts in each movement behavior from Time 1 to Time 2 were divided into four categories (consistently meeting the guidelines, from meeting to not meeting the guidelines, from not meeting to meeting the guidelines, and consistently not meeting the guidelines). Generalized linear mixed models were conducted using 410 valid responses (20.2 ± 1.0 years old at Time 2, 41.2% males). From Time 1 to Time 2, 22.2%, 2.0%, and 45.6% of the students consistently met the physical activity, sedentary behavior, and sleep guidelines, respectively. Compared to those who consistently met the sedentary behavior guideline, students who consistently failed to meet or changed from meeting to not meeting the guidelines had higher levels of PTSD. Students who had poor sleep quality at both time points or changed from good to bad sleep quality had higher levels of PTSD than those who maintained good sleep quality over time. Compared to those who consistently failed to meet the guideline, students who consistently met the PA guideline had higher levels of PTSD. These findings highlight the needs to improve and maintain healthy behaviors for mental health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthy School in COVID-19: Health Promotion Issues and Challenges)
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