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Special Issue "Health Impacts of Climate Change on Citizens in Urban Area"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2023 | Viewed by 819

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Donghyun Kim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department Urban Planning and Engineering, College of Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241, Korea
Interests: urban resilience; social innovation; regional inequality; urban epidemiology; climate change adaptation; regional planning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The health impacts of climate change are important and increasing concerns for citizens living in urban areas. With the emerging risk of climate change, the health impacts are related to socioeconomic damage and vulnerability including individual health status, occupational risk, social inequality, as well as community health. Most people around the world live in urban areas and understanding how climate change will affect health is an important issue for policy makers, urban planners, and public health institutions. In addition, it is a challenging task for academic researchers to predict the unknown effects of climate change. 

This Special Issue plans to provide an overview of the most recent advances in the field of public health, environmental studies, urban studies, and occupational health and safety. It aims to cover promising, recent, and innovative research studies on scientific analyses, evaluation, projection, policy issues, and strategies related to climate change and health in urban areas. Topics to be covered in this Special Issue may include, but are not limited to: the impacts of climate change on public health; health vulnerability and socioeconomic vulnerability to climate change; policy mechanisms and evaluation to mitigate the negative impacts of public health; economic analysis about public health impacts and socioeconomic changes; estimation about mortality related to climate change.

Dr. Donghyun Kim
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • health impacts
  • public health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Associations of Urban and Green Land Covers and Heat Waves in 49 U.S. Cities between 1992 and 2019
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(13), 7688; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137688 - 23 Jun 2022
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Abstract
The study aimed to examine how changing land use conditions are related to the occurrence of heat waves. The employed methods were (1) the Urban Expansion Intensity Index (UEII) and the Green Expansion Intensity (GEII) for 49 cities in the U.S. between 1992 [...] Read more.
The study aimed to examine how changing land use conditions are related to the occurrence of heat waves. The employed methods were (1) the Urban Expansion Intensity Index (UEII) and the Green Expansion Intensity (GEII) for 49 cities in the U.S. between 1992 and 2019; (2) Spearman correlation analyses of heat wave indicators including frequency, season, duration, and intensity for UEII, and GEII, respectively. Major findings include the following: (1) urban areas have increased rapidly with an average UEII value of 1.5; (2) green Areas have increased at a slow pace, which have a GEII average value of 0.017, where the median value is −0.1, meaning the green area is declining in most U.S. cities; (3) The UEII and heat wave duration show a negative relationship with a significant correlation (γs = −0.296 and ρ = 0.04); (4) UEII and heat wave intensity show a positive relationship with a significant correlation (γs = 0.32 and ρ = 0.027). It was found that heat wave intensity can be a public health issue in high urban expansion intensity areas. The results imply that cities would be better in a more compact pattern with more expanded green areas to mitigate the negative health impacts of heat waves on citizens in urban areas. It is noticeable that there are some patterns to be investigated further in the context of urban developments and heat wave characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Impacts of Climate Change on Citizens in Urban Area)
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Article
Spatial Disparity of Visitors Changes during Particulate Matter Warning Using Big Data Focused on Seoul, Korea
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6478; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116478 - 26 May 2022
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Abstract
This study examined the changes in the number of visitors to regions during periods of high particulate matter (PM) concentrations in Seoul and analyzed the regional differences of these changes. Further, it examined the spatial characteristics that affect these regional differences. This study [...] Read more.
This study examined the changes in the number of visitors to regions during periods of high particulate matter (PM) concentrations in Seoul and analyzed the regional differences of these changes. Further, it examined the spatial characteristics that affect these regional differences. This study mapped the regional differences by conducting a spatial cluster analysis using GIS and examined factors affecting the regional differences using logistic regression analysis. The visiting population data used in this study were obtained from the Big Data on the de facto population measured every hour at mobile base stations, and all analyses were conducted in terms of weekdays and weekends. The results indicated that the visiting population decreases significantly on weekdays when there are high PM concentrations; however, visits increase on weekends, even during periods of high PM concentrations. Moreover, there was a huge regional gap in visiting population changes. Regions with more commercial use, higher bus accessibility, and better pedestrian environment (pedestrian paths, Walk Score) were more likely to be hotspots, whereas regions with high residential and industrial use were more likely to be cold spots. These results can be used as the basic data for PM policies based on regional characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Impacts of Climate Change on Citizens in Urban Area)
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