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Special Issue "Health Assessment and Intervention"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2023 | Viewed by 5620

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Tsung-Cheng Hsieh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Medical Sciences, Tzu Chi University, Hualien 970374, Taiwan
Interests: clinical trial design; statistics medicine and pharmacy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Health plays an important role in achieving a good quality of life. In the current aging society, people are living longer worldwide. The proportion of the world's population over 60 years of age will increase from 12% to 22% between 2015 and 2050. Healthy living and aging are not only expected but are also a common goal of health professionals. 

Health assessment is the evaluation of physical or mental health status, and is used for early detection of diseases in people that may look and feel well. Comprehensive and efficient health-assessment tools or approaches can help to accurately understand health status for prevention or timely treatment/intervention of diseases.

Health interventions are programs or services delivered or undertaken primarily to treat disease or to maintain or restore functional ability. This is determined not only by the intervention itself, but also by the medical condition and patients’ health expectations. The methods or approaches of health assessment and interventions may vary for different populations, types of diseases, cultures, races, etc. 

Papers of a high academic standard that address the current state of knowledge and evidence on health assessment and intervention methods of human health are welcome for this Special Issue.

Dr. Tsung-Cheng Hsieh
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • health assessment
  • health evaluation
  • outcome assessment
  • process assessment
  • health approaches
  • health intervention
  • health care
  • patients’ care
  • physical health
  • mental health

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Article
Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire in People with Stroke
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 15450; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192315450 - 22 Nov 2022
Viewed by 397
Abstract
The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire was developed for generic use in the assessment of participation and activity levels. However, it is not available in Chinese and has not been tested in the stroke population. The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire was translated [...] Read more.
The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire was developed for generic use in the assessment of participation and activity levels. However, it is not available in Chinese and has not been tested in the stroke population. The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire was translated into Chinese and culturally adapted. Its psychometric properties were examined in 100 people with stroke. The participation and activity levels of people with stroke and healthy people were also compared. Content validity and internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = 0.86–0.91) were excellent. The test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.91–0.94) was also satisfactory. The standard error of the measurement was 4.10–5.31, and the minimal detectable change was 11.37–14.71. Convergent and divergent validity were supported by hypothesis testing. The instrument had a five-factor structure without a ceiling effect. Its routine activity and social engagement scores discriminated people with stroke from healthy people. In conclusion, the Chinese version of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire is reliable and valid for assessing participation and activity levels in the stroke population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Assessment and Intervention)
Article
The Incidence of Acute Respiratory Infection Was Higher in the Older Adults with Lower Limb Fracture Who Receive Spinal Anesthesia Than Those Who Receive General Anesthesia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 14260; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192114260 - 01 Nov 2022
Viewed by 667
Abstract
Introduction: Acute respiratory infection (ARI) can significantly reduce postoperative quality of life and impair the recovery of older adult patients with lower-limb fractures, and its relationship with methods of anesthesia remains inconclusive. Using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of [...] Read more.
Introduction: Acute respiratory infection (ARI) can significantly reduce postoperative quality of life and impair the recovery of older adult patients with lower-limb fractures, and its relationship with methods of anesthesia remains inconclusive. Using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan, this study examined the data of patients who received surgical management for lower-limb fractures and compared those who underwent general anesthesia (GA) with those who underwent regional anesthesia (RA) in terms of their incidence of acute upper and lower respiratory infection during the one-month postoperative period. The study also identified related risk factors. Material and Methods: Approximately two million patients were randomly sampled from the NHIRD registry. We identified and enrolled patients with lower-limb fractures who were over 60 years old and underwent GA or RA during surgeries conducted between 2010 and 2017. We divided these patients into two groups for further analysis. The outcome of this study was the development of ARI during the one-month postoperative period. Results: In total, 45,032 patients (GA group, 19,580 patients; RA group, 25,452 patients) with a mean age of 75.0 ± 8.9 years were included in our study. The incidence of postoperative ARI within one month of surgery was 8.0% (1562 patients) in the GA group and 9.5% (2412 patients) in the RA group, revealing a significant difference. The significant risk factors for the incidence of ARI were the application of RA for surgery, older age, hypertension, liver disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A subgroup analysis revealed that the RA method was associated with a significantly higher ARI incidence relative to the GA method among patients aged between 60 and 80 years, among male patients, among the patients with or without any comorbidity and among the patients without COPD. Conclusion: The incidence of postoperative ARI within one month of surgery was higher among older patients with lower-limb fractures who received RA for surgery than among those who received GA for surgery. The other major risk factors for ARI were older age, hypertension, liver disease, and COPD. Therefore, we should focus on patients with a high risk of developing ARI, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Assessment and Intervention)
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Article
20 Years of ICF—International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: Uses and Applications around the World
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(18), 11321; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191811321 - 08 Sep 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1715
Abstract
The International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) was approved in 2001 and, since then, several studies reported the increased interest about its use in different sectors. A recent overview that summarizes its applications is lacking. This study aims to provide an [...] Read more.
The International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) was approved in 2001 and, since then, several studies reported the increased interest about its use in different sectors. A recent overview that summarizes its applications is lacking. This study aims to provide an updated overview about 20 years of ICF application through an international online questionnaire, developed by the byline authors, and sent to each World Health Organization Collaborating Centers of the Family of International Classifications (WHO-FIC CCs). Data was collected during October 2020 and December 2021 and descriptive content analyses were used to report main results. Results show how, in most of the respondent countries represented by WHO-FIC CCs, ICF was mainly used in clinical practice, policy development and social policy, and in education areas. Despite its applications in different sectors, ICF use is not mandatory in most countries but, where used, it provides a biopsychosocial framework for policy development in health, functioning and disability. The study provides information about the needs related to ICF applications, that can be useful to organize targeted intervention plans. Furthermore, this survey methodology can be re-proposed periodically to monitor the use of the ICF in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Assessment and Intervention)
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Article
The Effects of Using a Low-Cost and Easily Accessible Exercise Toolkit Incorporated to the Governmental Health Program on Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Quasi-Experimental Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9614; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159614 - 04 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 788
Abstract
The Community Care Station (CCS) service was initiated by the Taiwanese government as a part of its elderly social services programs. This study aimed to investigate the effects of using an inexpensive exercise toolkit, containing a stick, theraband, sandbag and a small ball, [...] Read more.
The Community Care Station (CCS) service was initiated by the Taiwanese government as a part of its elderly social services programs. This study aimed to investigate the effects of using an inexpensive exercise toolkit, containing a stick, theraband, sandbag and a small ball, led by a physical therapist among community-dwelling older adults participating in CCS. A total of 90 participants (aged 77.0 ± 6.8 years) were recruited and divided into an intervention group (n = 45) and a comparison group (n = 45). The intervention group regularly participated in a health promotion program with the exercise toolkit for approximately 90 min per twice-weekly session for 3 months, and the comparison group maintained their usual CCS activity program. Both groups were assessed before and after the 3-month intervention period. Outcome measures included the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), one-leg stance, functional reach (FR), Timed Up and Go (TUG), and 10 m walk tests; 83 participants completed the study. No significant between-group differences were found at baseline in general characteristics or outcome variables. After 3 months, the intervention group showed the significant group x time interaction effects in SPPB, one-leg stance, FR, TUG and 10 m walk tests compared to the comparison group (p < 0.05).; A structured group-based health promotion program using a low-cost exercise toolkit could be effective in improving the physical performances, balance, and walking ability of community-dwelling older adults receiving CCS program services. Furthermore, the comparison group maintained most of their physical performances, even showing significant progress on FR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Assessment and Intervention)
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Article
Effects of Group Music Intervention on Depression for Elderly People in Nursing Homes
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9291; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159291 - 29 Jul 2022
Viewed by 1231
Abstract
Depression is the most common mental problem among the elderly, especially in long-term care facilities. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of group music intervention on depression for elderly people in nursing homes. Methods: A randomized control trial [...] Read more.
Depression is the most common mental problem among the elderly, especially in long-term care facilities. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of group music intervention on depression for elderly people in nursing homes. Methods: A randomized control trial consisting of sixty-three elderly participants randomly and blindly assigned to a music group or control group was utilized. The music group received 20 sessions of group music intervention (two 30-min sessions per week for 10 weeks), and the control group received usual care with no music intervention. The Geriatric Depression Scale—Short Form (GDS-SF) and salivary cortisol at baseline, 5 weeks, and 10 weeks were collected for analysis. Results of the GEEs (generalized estimating equations) analysis indicated that after 20 sessions for 10 weeks of group music intervention, the groups showed a statistically significant difference in depression at 5 weeks and 10 weeks. There was no significant difference in the salivary cortisol concentration between the two groups. The results show that the group music intervention may effectively reduce the depression scores for elderly people in nursing homes. Conclusion: The group music intervention has positive effects on depression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Assessment and Intervention)
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Case Report
Closing the Gap: From Research to Practice in Mental Health Interventions
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2141; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032141 - 24 Jan 2023
Viewed by 348
Abstract
Evidence-based practice is critical but challenging in mental health. Rigorous research-proven interventions often do not yield expected results in the clinical practice. This study aimed to explore factors contributing to the effectiveness of Occupational Connections (OC)—an intervention for promotion of engagement in meaningful [...] Read more.
Evidence-based practice is critical but challenging in mental health. Rigorous research-proven interventions often do not yield expected results in the clinical practice. This study aimed to explore factors contributing to the effectiveness of Occupational Connections (OC)—an intervention for promotion of engagement in meaningful occupations in serious mental illness (SMI)—based on case series study of three quasi-experimental studies. The studies focused on people with SMI (), admitted to intensive mental health services participated in the OC, as well as on a control condition group. Similar evaluation procedures throughout these studies addressed primary outcomes of participation dimensions and recovery orientation, as well as secondary outcomes of functional capacity, cognition, and symptom severity. Patterns of changes in outcome measures varied between the three studies as to direction and extension. In the OC groups, 29–60% of the outcome measurements were changed, in comparison to 29–43% of measurements in the control groups. The secondary outcomes were consistently improved in the OC (18–100% of measurements) in comparison to the control (18–67%). The analysis of the studies revealed that clinical effectiveness of participation-oriented intervention varied dependent on interplay between the clinical context, clinician actions, served persons’ characteristics, and evidence-building process. These factors should be considered to maximize research benefits for practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Assessment and Intervention)
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