Special Issue "Environmental Physiology in Health and Disease"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Song-Young Park
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health and Kinesiology, University of Nebraska- Omaha, 6001 Dodge St, Omaha, NE 68182, USA
Interests: cardiovascular physiology; aging; exercise; endothelial function; hypertension
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Elizabeth Pekas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Health & Kinesiology - Vascular Research Lab, University of Nebraska at Omaha | UN Omaha, 6001 Dodge St, Omaha, NE 68182, USA
Interests: cardiovascular physiology; chronic ischemia; exercise; endothelial function; mitochondrial dysfunction
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cardiovascular diseases have been known as the number 1 cause of death globally. Although research has focused on mechanisms underlying the progression of cardiovascular diseases, more work that focuses on beneficial therapies which can treat these cardiovascular diseases and related symptoms is warranted. Exercise training is a commonly proposed modality to slow disease progression and reduce pain. In addition to exercise, environmental stressors such as temperature have been suggested as viable nonpharmacological treatment options for those who may not be able to perform exercise. Heat and cold therapies have been shown to be beneficial for controlling pain and for eliciting cardiovascular responses that may induce similar adaptations to exercise alone in cardiovascular disease populations. However, the mechanisms underlying these adaptations have not been well-documented. The purpose of this Special Issue is to examine the health effects of environmental stressors (i.e., temperature therapy) on cardiovascular disease risks and symptoms. The further insight into these potential mechanisms will not only benefit researchers for developing therapies, but also clinicians who may incorporate these therapies into their medical practices, thereby potentially reducing cardiovascular disease risk and associated symptoms worldwide.

Dr. Song-Young Park
Dr. Elizabeth Pekas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental physiology
  • heat therapy
  • cold therapy
  • cryotherapy
  • thermotherapy
  • vascular disease

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Relative Contribution among Physical Fitness Factors Contributing to the Performance of Modern Pentathlon
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4880; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094880 - 03 May 2021
Viewed by 495
Abstract
This study reveals the relationship between physical fitness factors and performance in modern pentathlon and identifies the contribution of each physical factor to overall performance. The physical fitness assessment data and the competition records collected by the Korean national team pentathletes for the [...] Read more.
This study reveals the relationship between physical fitness factors and performance in modern pentathlon and identifies the contribution of each physical factor to overall performance. The physical fitness assessment data and the competition records collected by the Korean national team pentathletes for the years 2005 to 2019 were tracked. The correlation between the competition records and fitness factors was confirmed by correlation analysis. In addition, the physical factors affecting performance were identified through multiple regression analysis, and the average difference between national and international competitions was verified by t-test. The first result was that fencing, swimming, and horseback riding rankings were more relevant to the overall pentathlon performance score than the combined rankings in national competitions. In the international competitions, performance in the combined running and shooting event was more relevant than fencing, swimming, and horseback riding. Second, the basic fitness factors of grip strength and sergeant jump and the specific fitness factors of leg strength—left and right average flexor were correlated with overall pentathlon performance national competitions. However, in international competitions, sergeant jump, 20 m shuttle run, reaction time, lung capacity, and back strength were correlated (presented in high to low order). In terms of the specific fitness factors, relative (%BW) and absolute (Nm) leg strength—left and right average flexor, lower body anaerobic fatigue rate, half squat, relative (W/kg) and absolute (Watts) maximal lower body anaerobic power were correlated accordingly with overall pentathlon performance. Third, we analyzed the differences between average performance in national and international competitions. Only the combined running and shooting event out of the five modern pentathlon events showed a difference. Grip strength and relative leg strength—average extensor AP (%BW) appeared to be different among the physical fitness factors. Fourth, we examined the level of contribution of each of the fitness factors on overall performance. The model’s goodness of fit was confirmed, and grip strength was found to have a significant contribution on overall performance. Furthermore, the level of contribution was higher in the following order: relative leg strength—left and right average flexor (%BW), bench press, half squat, relative leg strength—average extensor AP(%BW), GXT—time to exhaustion, relative lower body anaerobic average power (W/kg), and maximal lactic acid concentration. With the 2020 Tokyo Olympics just around the corner, combined running and shooting performance appeared to be a decisive factor in the final ranking in modern pentathlon according to the analysis of the basic and specific fitness factors of pentathletes. The basic fitness factors are critical in order of sergeant jump, grip strength, reaction time, lung capacity, side-step, back strength, 20m shuttle run, sit-and-reach, sit-ups, and single leg standing. With respect to the specific fitness factors, relative leg strength—left and right average flexor (%BW), bench press, half squat, relative leg strength—average extensor AP (%BW), GXT—time to exhaustion, relative lower body anaerobic average power (W/kg), and maximal lactic acid concentration showed their relevance accordingly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Physiology in Health and Disease)
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