Next Article in Journal
Bi-Directionality between Physical Activity within School and Fundamental Movement Skills in School-Aged Students: A Cross-Lagged Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Exploring and Developing a Scale Using Item Response Theory for Sport Psychological Skills in Speed Skaters
Previous Article in Journal
γ-Polyglutamic Acid Production, Biocontrol, and Stress Tolerance: Multifunction of Bacillus subtilis A-5 and the Complete Genome Analysis
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Association of Menstruation and Leisure-Time Physical Activity among Korean Female University Students: A Preliminary Study
 
 
Article

Gait Speed and Sleep Duration Is Associated with Increased Risk of MCI in Older Community-Dwelling Adults

by 1,†, 2,† and 2,*
1
Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Dong-A University, Busan 49315, Korea
2
Department of Healthcare and Science, Dong-A University, Busan 49315, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(13), 7625; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137625
Received: 11 May 2022 / Revised: 18 June 2022 / Accepted: 19 June 2022 / Published: 22 June 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Physiology in Health and Disease)
This study aimed to examine the linear and nonlinear associations between sleep duration and gait speed and the risk of developing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in community-dwelling older adults. Participants were 233 older adults who met the study inclusion criteria. The MCI diagnosis was based on medical evaluations through a clinical interview conducted by a dementia specialist. Self-reported sleep duration was evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. The usual gait speed was calculated from the time taken to walk along a 4 m walkway. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and the 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of developing MCI in relation to sleep duration and gait speed. Generalized additive models were used to examine the dose–response relationships between sleep duration, gait speed, and the risk of developing MCI. Slower gait speed (OR: 1.84, 95%; CI: 1.00–3.13) and poor sleep duration (OR: 1.76, 95%; CI: 1.00–3.35) were associated with the risk of developing MCI, compared with their optimal status. In addition, the combination of poor sleep and slower gait was associated with a higher risk of developing MCI than optimal sleep duration and gait speed (OR: 3.13, 95%; CI: 1.93–5.14). Furthermore, gait speed and sleep duration were non-linearly associated with the risk of developing MCI. These results highlight the complex interplay and synergism between sleep duration and gait abilities on the risk of developing MCI in older adults. In addition, our results suggest that slower gait speed (<1.0 m/s) and short (<330 min) and long (>480 min) sleep duration may be linked to MCI risks through underlying pathways. View Full-Text
Keywords: gait speed; sleep; mild cognitive impairment; elderly gait speed; sleep; mild cognitive impairment; elderly
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Yoon, E.; Bae, S.; Park, H. Gait Speed and Sleep Duration Is Associated with Increased Risk of MCI in Older Community-Dwelling Adults. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 7625. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137625

AMA Style

Yoon E, Bae S, Park H. Gait Speed and Sleep Duration Is Associated with Increased Risk of MCI in Older Community-Dwelling Adults. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(13):7625. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137625

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yoon, Eunju, Seongryu Bae, and Hyuntae Park. 2022. "Gait Speed and Sleep Duration Is Associated with Increased Risk of MCI in Older Community-Dwelling Adults" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 13: 7625. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137625

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop