Special Issue "Executive Control and Emotion Regulation in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Daniel Adrover-Roig
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universitat de les Illes Balears, 07122 Palma, Illes Balears, Spain
Interests: cognitive development; bilingualism; executive control; bullying and victimization.
Dr. Eva Aguilar Mediavilla
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Applied Pedagogy and Educational Psychology, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Illes Balears, 07122 Palma, Spain
Interests: language development; bilingual acquisition; phonological acquisition; developmental language disorder; language assessment; bullying
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Raúl López Penadés
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Universitat de les Illes Balears, 07122 Palma, Illes Balears, Spain
Interests: psychopathology; emotion regulation; psychophysiological response; personality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The present Special Issue aims to publish studies on executive control (EC), emotion regulation (ER), and their associations. The literature on EC defines it as a class of controlled cognitive processes that allows for the accomplishment of current task goals, including focusing attention on task-relevant information and inhibiting irrelevant information. Researchers have proposed that processes of EC can support ER and vice-versa. A maladaptive pattern of ER, or a dysfunctional capacity for EC, which involves a failure to regulate or interfere with adaptive functioning, can cause serious problems that hamper well-being and everyday functioning. In this way, youngsters with an adequate ER are better able to maintain greater social commitment, to solve problems efficiently, and to communicate more effectively, which enables satisfactory social relationships and proper socio-emotional development. Thus, a balanced relationship between EC and ER can affect a wide array of children’s and adolescent’s lives and is crucial for adequate psychological, emotional, cognitive, and social adjustment.

This Special Issue aims to bring together studies that explore EC, ER, and their mutual connections, and other potential variables that illustrate this association with children’s, adolescents’ and young adults’ well-being, such as conduct problems or even peer victimization.

This Special Issue is open to any research addressing a health perspective from a psychological and/or educational point of view that includes theoretical and empirical studies on executive control abilities and emotion regulation.

Dr. Daniel Adrover-Roig
Dr. Eva Aguilar Mediavilla
Dr. Raúl López Penadés
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Executive control
  • Emotion regulation
  • Emotional intelligence
  • Early life (risk) factors
  • Mental health
  • Children, adolescents, and young adults
  • Family factors
  • Environment
  • Behavioral problems
  • Cognitive development

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Emotion Regulation Style and Daily Rumination: Potential Mediators between Affect and Both Depression and Anxiety during Adolescence
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6614; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186614 - 11 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 746
Abstract
Adolescence is a vulnerable period for depressive and anxious symptom development, and emotion regulation (ER) may be one mechanism linking temperament—i.e., positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA)—with such symptomatology. Rumination is a common ER strategy that is traditionally assessed using self-reported questionnaires, [...] Read more.
Adolescence is a vulnerable period for depressive and anxious symptom development, and emotion regulation (ER) may be one mechanism linking temperament—i.e., positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA)—with such symptomatology. Rumination is a common ER strategy that is traditionally assessed using self-reported questionnaires, but it would also be interesting to examine it with an Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) approach. Sixty-five adolescents (Mage = 14.69; SDage = 0.82; range = 14–17 years old; 53.80% girls) completed self-report measures of temperament, ER style, depression and anxiety, and underwent an EMA to investigate rumination use. Results revealed that negative ER style and rumination use mediated the relationship between NA and depression, while only rumination use mediated the relationship between PA and depression. Moreover, NA contributed to increase anxiety, but negative ER style did not significantly mediate this relationship. Rumination use also had no effect on anxiety. This study provides further support for the relationship between temperament, ER, and internalizing problems. It seems that both a negative ER style and rumination use mediate the relationship between NA and depression whereas only NA had a significant direct effect on anxiety. Furthermore, PA buffered the effect of rumination use on depression in this study. Full article
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