Special Issue "Perspectives on Social and Environmental Determinants of Oral Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Oral Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimaraes de Abreu
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Guest Editor
Department of Community and Preventive Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte - Minas Gerais, 31270, Brazil
Interests: oral health epidemiology; quantitative methodology; dental public health

Special Issue Information

 Dear Colleagues,

The oral health status of populations involves a complex network of determination. The most recent definition of the World Dental Federation pointed out that social environment and physical environment are determinants of oral health. There is evidence in the scientific literature on the importance of social determinants of health and specifically in oral health. The investigation of environmental factors on oral health needs to progress further. Knowledge of these determinants allows us to propose strategies for overcoming inequalities in oral health. This is one of the challenges of today’s world. This Special Issue will examine studies of social and environmental determinants of oral health.

Prof. Dr. Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimaraes de Abreu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Socioeconomic factors
  • Oral health
  • Environmental health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Sociodemographic, Behavioral and Oral Health Factors in Maternal and Child Health: An Interventional and Associative Study from the Network Perspective
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3895; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083895 - 08 Apr 2021
Viewed by 416
Abstract
Oral healthcare during pregnancy needs to be part of the assistance routine given to pregnant women by health professionals as a way to encourage self-care and strengthen the general health of the mother and the baby. The aim of this study was to [...] Read more.
Oral healthcare during pregnancy needs to be part of the assistance routine given to pregnant women by health professionals as a way to encourage self-care and strengthen the general health of the mother and the baby. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an integrated oral healthcare intervention for pregnant women and to analyze the association of sociodemographic, behavioral, oral health and general maternal and child health factors in prenatal care at usual risk in primary care in a city in the northeast of Brazil, in 2018–2019. A controlled, randomized, single-blinded community trial was conducted. The intervention group (IG) received dental assistance and collective health education actions in conversation circles, while the control group (CG) received the usual assistance. All pregnant women (146 in total, 58 from IG and 88 from CG) that took part in the trial answered a questionnaire and underwent a dental examination at the beginning of prenatal care and at the puerperal visit. To assess the effect of the intervention, a network analysis was used. The results have shown that being in the control group was associated with neonatal complications (0.89) and prematurity (0.54); the use of tobacco and alcohol are associated with high risk in initial and final oral health; lower educational level of the pregnant women implicates high risk for initial oral health (−0.19), final oral health (−0.26), pregnancy complications (−0.13), low birth weight (−0.23), prematurity (−0.19) and complications in the newborn (−0.14). Having a low family income (≤261.36 USD) has shown a high risk for initial oral health (−0.14), final oral health (−0.20) and prematurity (−0.15). The intervention based on integrated oral healthcare for pregnant women indicated that socioeconomic and behavioral factors must be considered as determinants for the quality of women and children’s health and that multi-professional performance during prenatal care contributes to the positive outcomes of pregnancy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perspectives on Social and Environmental Determinants of Oral Health)
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Open AccessArticle
The Role of Organizational Factors and Human Resources in the Provision of Dental Prosthesis in Primary Dental Care in Brazil
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1646; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051646 - 03 Mar 2020
Viewed by 879
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate factors associated with dental prosthesis procedures by oral health teams (OHTs) in the Brazilian primary health care in 2013–2014, who participated in the National Program for Improving Access and Quality of Primary Health Care (PMAQ-AB). This is an [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate factors associated with dental prosthesis procedures by oral health teams (OHTs) in the Brazilian primary health care in 2013–2014, who participated in the National Program for Improving Access and Quality of Primary Health Care (PMAQ-AB). This is an analytical cross-sectional study using a questionnaire with dichotomous questions applied in 18,114 OHTs. The dependent variable studied was making any type of prosthesis (removable or fixed). Independent variables involved issues related to human resources and health service management. Data were submitted to simple and multiple binary logistic regression with odds ratio calculation, 95% confidence intervals, and p-values. Most OHTs (57%) do not perform any dental prosthesis. The teams that are more likely to perform dental prostheses have human resources-related characteristics, such as professionals admitted through public examinations (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.14–1.36) and those involved in permanent education (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.02–1.26). Moreover, OHTs with a more organized work process and that receive more significant support from municipal management are more likely to perform dental prostheses (p < 0.05). The oral health teams which tended to provide the most dental prostheses to benefit patients were; hired as civil servants, had a municipal career plan, involved all members of the oral health team, and trained undergraduate dental students from outreach programs. Better organizational support and improved work incentives may be needed to get the majority of oral health teams to start providing dental prostheses to their patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perspectives on Social and Environmental Determinants of Oral Health)
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