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Physical Activity on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention among Individuals with Disabilities

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Disabilities".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 885

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Chih-Chia (J.J.) Chen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Cognitive and Motor Control Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 39762, USA
Interests: exercise & mental health in intellectual and developmental disabilities

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

A physically active lifestyle is accompanied by many physical and mental health benefits. Currently, an estimated one billion people globally live with a disability. Individuals with disabilities are more likely to have heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, or symptoms of depression than individuals without disabilities. As individuals with disabilities live longer, a greater emphasis must be placed on determining the benefits of exercise among individuals with disabilities. Past literature has shown that an active lifestyle could not only reduce the risk of secondary health problems but also positively influence functional performance and quality of life for individuals with disabilities.

This Special Issue aims to publish high-quality, multi-disciplinary research which will advance the understanding of issues related to the effect of physical activity on health (physical and mental health) and disease prevention among individuals with disabilities (for example, people with intellectual disabilities, autism, cerebral palsy, visual impairment, or Parkinson's disease). Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following areas: epidemiological studies in relation to disability; adapted physical education and activity; effects of exercise on health and well-being, ability, and quality of life; accessibility and safety of exercise programs. We hope that this Special Issue will encourage health professionals, parents, coaches, physical educators, and physical education scholars to consider the significance of including disabled people as active participants in more general research studies.

Dr. Chih-Chia (J.J.) Chen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • adapted physical activity
  • exercise intervention
  • physical and mental health
  • quality of life
  • disabilities

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 1677 KiB  
Article
The Effects of an Inclusive Badminton Program on Static Postural Control for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(2), 210; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21020210 - 10 Feb 2024
Viewed by 712
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to examine static postural control/balance in young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and typically developing (TD) young adults before, during, and after an inclusive badminton intervention. Eight participants (four IDD-BADM and four TD-BADM) participated in [...] Read more.
The purpose of the study was to examine static postural control/balance in young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and typically developing (TD) young adults before, during, and after an inclusive badminton intervention. Eight participants (four IDD-BADM and four TD-BADM) participated in a 12-week inclusive badminton intervention, with the other eight participants as matched controls (four IDD-CONTR and four TD-CONTR) (74.19 kg ± 9.8 kg, 171.96 cm ± 5.4 cm; 21.7 ± 1.8 years of age; nine females and seven males; eight with IDD and eight TD). The study followed a repeated measures design (pre, mid, post) before the intervention, at 6 weeks, and after 12 weeks. Static postural sway conditions included: bilateral stance eyes open (20 s), eyes closed (10 s), foam eyes open (20 s), foam eyes closed (10 s), and unilateral stance eyes open (10 s) and foam eyes open (10 s). Sway measurements included: average anterior/posterior (A/P) displacement (in), average medial/lateral (M/L) displacement (in), average 95% ellipsoid area (in2), and average velocity (ft/s). Significant time × group interactions were reported for average velocity (EO) (p = 0.030), average length (EO) (p = 0.030), 95% ellipsoid area (EO) (p = 0.049), and average A/P displacement (1LEO) (p = 0.036) for IDD-BADM. Significant time main effects were reported for average A/P displacement (FEO) (p = 0.040) for IDD groups. Significant time main effects were reported for average M/L displacement (EO) (p = 0.001), (EC) (p = 0.004), (FEO) (p = 0.005), (FEC) (p = 0.004), and average A/P displacement (EO) (p = 0.006) and (FEO) (p = 0.005) for TD groups. An inclusive badminton program indicated evidence of improved static postural control for those with IDD. However, no significant differences were reported for TD peers. Full article
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