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Special Issue "Urban Environmental Quality"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Man-Sing Wong

Department of Land Surveying and Geo-Informatics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Urban Environment; Remote Sensing; Climate Change; Land Use and Land Cover Mapping

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The urban environment has long been associated with community health risks. However, quantifying environmental exposure for measuring urban environmental quality is always a challenge, since environmental components of the complex system across the urban environment are interacting with each other. Moreover, failure to quantify the environmental quality can result in a problematic estimation of environmental health risks.

Therefore, this Special Issue aims to target the following topics:

1) improvement of exposure assessments for measuring urban environmental quality;

2) linking indoor and outdoor environmental exposures by modelling;

3) novel design to spatially or spatio-temporally estimate urban environmental quality;

4) application of community health assessment with improved data for urban environmental quality.

Dr. Man-sing Wong
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access bimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental exposures
  • spatial modelling
  • community health

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle How Outdoor Trees Affect Indoor Particulate Matter Dispersion: CFD Simulations in a Naturally Ventilated Auditorium
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(12), 2862; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122862
Received: 13 November 2018 / Revised: 3 December 2018 / Accepted: 12 December 2018 / Published: 14 December 2018
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Abstract
This study used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models, coupling with a standard k-ε model based on the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach and a revised generalized drift flux model, to investigate effects of outdoor trees on indoor PM1.0, PM2.5, and
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This study used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models, coupling with a standard k-ε model based on the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach and a revised generalized drift flux model, to investigate effects of outdoor trees on indoor PM1.0, PM2.5, and PM10 dispersion in a naturally ventilated auditorium. Crown volume coverage (CVC) was introduced to quantify outdoor trees. Simulations were performed on various CVCs, oncoming wind velocities and window opening sizes (wall porosities were 3.5 and 7.0%, respectively, for half and fully opened windows). The results were as follows: (1) A vortex formed inside the auditorium in the baseline scenario, and the airflow recirculation created a well-mixed zone with little variation in particle concentrations. There was a noticeable decrease in indoor PM10 with the increasing distance from the inlet boundary due to turbulent diffusion. (2) Assuming that pollution sources were diluted through the inlet, average indoor particle concentrations rose exponentially with increasing oncoming wind speed. PM10 changed most significantly due to turbulent diffusion and surface deposition reduction intensified by the increased wind velocity. (3) Increasing the window opening improved indoor cross-ventilation, thus reducing indoor particle concentrations. (4) When 2.87 m3/m2CVC ≤ 4.73 m3/m2, indoor PM2.5 could meet requirements of the World Health Organization’s air quality guidelines (IT-3) for 24-hour mean concentrations; and (5) average indoor particle concentrations had positive correlations with natural ventilation rates (R2 = 0.9085, 0.961, 0.9683 for PM1.0, PM2.5, and PM10, respectively, when the wall porosity was 3.5%; R2 = 0.9158, 0.9734, 0.976 for PM1.0, PM2.5, and PM10, respectively, when the wall porosity was 7.0%). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Environmental Quality)
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Open AccessArticle Spatial and Temporal Variations of Six Criteria Air Pollutants in Fujian Province, China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(12), 2846; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122846
Received: 6 November 2018 / Revised: 2 December 2018 / Accepted: 11 December 2018 / Published: 13 December 2018
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Abstract
Air pollution has become a critical issue in the urban areas of southeastern China in recent years. A complete understanding of the tempo-spatial characteristics of air pollution can help the public and governmental bodies manage their lives and work better. In this study,
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Air pollution has become a critical issue in the urban areas of southeastern China in recent years. A complete understanding of the tempo-spatial characteristics of air pollution can help the public and governmental bodies manage their lives and work better. In this study, data for six criteria air pollutants (including particulate matter (PM2.5, PM10), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3)) from 37 sites in nine major cities within Fujian Province, China were collected between January 2015 to December 2016, and analyzed. We analyzed the spatial and temporal variations of these six criteria pollutants, as well as the attainment rates, and identified what were the major pollutants. Our results show that: (1) the two-year mean values of PM2.5 and PM10 exceeded the Chinese National Ambient Air Quality Standard (CAAQS) standard I levels, whereas other air pollutants were below the CAAQS standard I; (2) the six criteria air pollutants show spatial variations (i.e. most air pollutants were higher in the city center areas, followed by suburban areas and exurban areas, except for O3; and the concentrations of PM10, PM2.5, NO2, O3 were higher in coastal cities than in inland cities); (3) seasonal variations and the no attainment rates of air pollutants were found to be higher in cold seasons and lower in warm seasons, except for O3; (4) the most frequently present air pollutant was PM10, with PM2.5 and O3 being the second and third most frequent, respectively; (5) all the air pollutants, except O3, showed positive correlations with each other. These results provide additional information for the effective control of air pollution in the province of Fujian. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Environmental Quality)
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Open AccessArticle Influence of Heat Events on the Composition of Airborne Bacterial Communities in Urban Ecosystems
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(10), 2295; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15102295
Received: 17 August 2018 / Revised: 19 September 2018 / Accepted: 1 October 2018 / Published: 19 October 2018
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Abstract
Airborne bacteria are significantly affected by meteorological and environmental conditions. However, there is little quantitative data available on the effects of these factors on airborne bacteria in urban ecosystems. In the present study, we analyzed weather-dependent changes in the composition of airborne bacterial
[...] Read more.
Airborne bacteria are significantly affected by meteorological and environmental conditions. However, there is little quantitative data available on the effects of these factors on airborne bacteria in urban ecosystems. In the present study, we analyzed weather-dependent changes in the composition of airborne bacterial communities using high throughput sequencing. Samples were collected before and after a period of constant hot weather at four selected sampling sites (YRBS, ZJGUSJC, TJCR, and BLQG) in Hangzhou. Our results show that the average amount of bacterial 16S rRNA gene copy numbers per m3 of air decreased significantly after constant high temperature. In addition, the number of operational taxonomic units and the Shannon–Wiener diversity indexes of the samples at all four selected sampling sites were significantly decreased after the heat event, showing notable impact on bacterial diversity. We also detected a significant increase in the abundances of spore-forming bacteria. Firmicutes increased from 3.7% to 9.9%, Bacillales increased from 2.6% to 7.6%, and Bacillaceae increased from 1.5% to 5.9%. In addition, we observed an increase in beta-Proteobacteria (18.2% to 50.3%), Rhodocyclaceae (6.9% to 29.9%), and Burkholderiaceae (8.1% to 15.2%). On the other hand, the abundance of alpha-Proteobacteria (39.6% to 9.8%), Caulobacteraceae (17.9% to 0.5%), Sphingomonadaceae (7.2% to 3.3%), and Xanthomonadaceae (3.0% to 0.5%) was significantly lower. Taken together, our data suggest that the composition of airborne bacterial communities varies greatly dependent on heat events, and that such communities include several species that are highly susceptible to high-temperature related stressors such as high air temperature, low relative humidity, and high intensity of solar radiation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Environmental Quality)
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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