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Special Issue "Temperature Variability and Mortality/Morbidity"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Yasushi Honda
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 Japan
Interests: climate change impact; heat-related excess mortality; environmental epidemiology; projection of climate change health impact; air pollution epidemiology
Prof. Dr. Masahiro Hashizume
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Paediatric Infectious Diseases, Institute of Tropical Medcine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan
Interests: epidemiology; climate change; environment; population health
Prof. Dr. Ho Kim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Graduate School Of Public Health, Seoul National University, 1 Kwanak-Ro Kwanak-Gu, Seoul 08826, Korea
Interests: climate change and health; air pollution; epidemiology; epidemiological methodologies; bioinformatics; statistical consulting; clinical trials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

After the latest comprehensive health impact assessment published by WHO in 2014, temperature-related illness has caught global attention and many papers have been published since then. Still, we have no definite idea how the temperature-mortality relation changed over time, or across different climate, for example. We know that the minimum mortality temperature (at which the heat-related mortality is lowest) has moved to higher temperature and a risk for a fixed intensity of heat has been declining, but even with MCC framework (http://mccstudy.lshtm.ac.uk/), we are not successful how fast these phenomena are occurring. In addition, although some researchers reported that the attributable fraction of cold was much larger than that of heat, especially mild cold, the lag pattern of cold mortality has negative risk at day zero, which cannot be regarded as biologically feasible and whether the fraction actually attributable to cold or not is still debatable. In this Special Issue, we call for papers regarding the relation between temperature (including its variability) and mortality and morbidity, especially those that answer these unanswered questions. Although we editors encourage to tackle these issues, we welcome other new findings on temperature (and its variability) and health outcome relation.

Prof. Dr. Yasushi Honda
Prof. Dr. Masahiro Hashizume
Prof. Dr. Ho Kim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Temperature related illness
  • Temperature mortality
  • Temperature variability

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Advancing our Understanding of Heat Wave Criteria and Associated Health Impacts to Improve Heat Wave Alerts in Developing Country Settings
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(12), 2089; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16122089 - 13 Jun 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1541
Abstract
Health effects of heat waves with high baseline temperatures in areas such as India remain a critical research gap. In these regions, extreme temperatures may affect the underlying population’s adaptive capacity; heat wave alerts should be optimized to avoid continuous high alert status [...] Read more.
Health effects of heat waves with high baseline temperatures in areas such as India remain a critical research gap. In these regions, extreme temperatures may affect the underlying population’s adaptive capacity; heat wave alerts should be optimized to avoid continuous high alert status and enhance constrained resources, especially under a changing climate. Data from registrars and meteorological departments were collected for four communities in Northwestern India. Propensity Score Matching (PSM) was used to obtain the relative risk of mortality and number of attributable deaths (i.e., absolute risk which incorporates the number of heat wave days) under a variety of heat wave definitions (n = 13) incorporating duration and intensity. Heat waves’ timing in season was also assessed for potential effect modification. Relative risk of heat waves (risk of mortality comparing heat wave days to matched non-heat wave days) varied by heat wave definition and ranged from 1.28 [95% Confidence Interval: 1.11–1.46] in Churu (utilizing the 95th percentile of temperature for at least two consecutive days) to 1.03 [95% CI: 0.87–1.23] in Idar and Himmatnagar (utilizing the 95th percentile of temperature for at least four consecutive days). The data trended towards a higher risk for heat waves later in the season. Some heat wave definitions displayed similar attributable mortalities despite differences in the number of identified heat wave days. These findings provide opportunities to assess the “efficiency” (or number of days versus potential attributable health impacts) associated with alternative heat wave definitions. Findings on both effect modification and trade-offs between number of days identified as “heat wave” versus health effects provide tools for policy makers to determine the most important criteria for defining thresholds to trigger heat wave alerts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Temperature Variability and Mortality/Morbidity)
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Article
Association between Weather Types based on the Spatial Synoptic Classification and All-Cause Mortality in Sweden, 1991–2014
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(10), 1696; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101696 - 14 May 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1663
Abstract
Much is known about the adverse health impact of high and low temperatures. The Spatial Synoptic Classification is a useful tool for assessing weather effects on health because it considers the combined effect of meteorological factors rather than temperature only. The aim of [...] Read more.
Much is known about the adverse health impact of high and low temperatures. The Spatial Synoptic Classification is a useful tool for assessing weather effects on health because it considers the combined effect of meteorological factors rather than temperature only. The aim of this study was to assess the association between oppressive weather types and daily total mortality in Sweden. Time-series Poisson regression with distributed lags was used to assess the relationship between oppressive weather (Dry Polar, Dry Tropical, Moist Polar, and Moist Tropical) and daily deaths over 14 days in the extended summer (May to September), and 28 days during the extended winter (November to March), from 1991 to 2014. Days not classified as oppressive weather served as the reference category. We computed relative risks with 95% confidence intervals, adjusting for trends and seasonality. Results of the southern (Skåne and Stockholm) and northern (Jämtland and Västerbotten) locations were pooled using meta-analysis for regional-level estimates. Analyses were performed using the dlnm and mvmeta packages in R. During summer, in the South, the Moist Tropical and Dry Tropical weather types increased the mortality at lag 0 through lag 3 and lag 6, respectively. Moist Polar weather was associated with mortality at longer lags. In the North, Dry Tropical weather increased the mortality at shorter lags. During winter, in the South, Dry Polar and Moist Polar weather increased mortality from lag 6 to lag 10 and from lag 19 to lag 26, respectively. No effect of oppressive weather was found in the North. The effect of oppressive weather types in Sweden varies across seasons and regions. In the North, a small study sample reduces precision of estimates, while in the South, the effect of oppressive weather types is more evident in both seasons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Temperature Variability and Mortality/Morbidity)
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Article
Effects of Extreme Temperatures on Mortality and Hospitalization in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 432; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030432 - 02 Feb 2019
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2472
Abstract
There is a lack of research focusing on the association of temperature with mortality and hospitalization in developing countries with tropical climates and a low capacity to cope with the influences of extreme weather events. This study aimed to examine and compare the [...] Read more.
There is a lack of research focusing on the association of temperature with mortality and hospitalization in developing countries with tropical climates and a low capacity to cope with the influences of extreme weather events. This study aimed to examine and compare the effect of temperature, including heat waves, on mortality and hospitalization in the most populous city of Vietnam. We used quasi-Poisson time series regression coupled with the distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) to examine the overall pattern and compare the temperature-health outcome relationship. The main and added effects of heat waves were evaluated. The main effect of heat waves significantly increased the risk of all cause-specific mortality. Significant main effects of heat waves on hospitalization were observed only for elderly people and people with respiratory diseases (elderly, relative risk (RR) = 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14–3.45; respiratory diseases, RR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.19–1.42). The RRs of the main effect were substantially higher than those of the added effect in mortality; the same was applicable for hospitalizations of people with respiratory diseases and elderly people. The findings of this study have important implications for public health adaptation and prevention program implementation in the protection of residents from the adverse health effects of temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Temperature Variability and Mortality/Morbidity)
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