Special Issue "Strategies to Improve Recovery of Performance after Matches, Training Sessions, and Competitive Events"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Gustavo R Mota
Website
Guest Editor
1. Federal University of Triangulo Mineiro, Uberaba, MG, Brazil2. University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Interests: ergogenic aids; performance; recovery; prevention; health; soccer; team sports; blood flow; fitness.
Dr. Moacir Marocolo
Website
Guest Editor
1. Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil 2. University of Sport in Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
Interests: ergogenic aids; performance; recovery; prevention; health; combat sports; blood flow; anabolic steroids.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

To maximize human performance, the recovery process is as important as the exercise training process. Poor recovery may be associated with lower performance and higher risk for injury in different sports modalities.

However, historically there are many more scientific studies aiming to understand the optimal load during training than to design optimal recovery plans. Several ergogenic aids (e.g., substances, nutrients, techniques, devices, garments) are supposed to improve physiological and psychological variables that would speed up the recovery of performance, directly or indirectly. In other words, they would allow the body to be ready for maximal performance earlier, generating many benefits.

Despite the fact that several coaches and athletes regularly use these strategies to improve recovery after training and matches, the scientific basis supporting these approaches is not always solid. Thus, scientific studies should test the efficacy of these strategies and their mechanisms.

This Special Issue aims to present scientific outcomes of well-controlled studies that show the efficacy of (or refute) strategies to enhance recovery of performance (e.g., hyperoxia, ischemic conditioning, myofascial release, compression garments, supplements, grounding).

Dr. Mota Gustavo R.
Dr. Moacir Marocolo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ergogenic aids
  • recovery
  • prevention
  • health
  • muscular temperature, blood flow activation, laser, deep massage

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Acute Photobiomodulation Does Not Influence Specific High-Intensity and Intermittent Performance in Female Futsal Players
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7253; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197253 - 04 Oct 2020
Abstract
The acute improvement of performance after photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) has been reported in different types of exercise. However, the effect on high-intensity and intermittent exercises that are relevant for team sports is unknown. Thus, we evaluated the effect of prior acute application of [...] Read more.
The acute improvement of performance after photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) has been reported in different types of exercise. However, the effect on high-intensity and intermittent exercises that are relevant for team sports is unknown. Thus, we evaluated the effect of prior acute application of PBMT on high-intensity and intermittent exercise performance, muscle oxygenation, and physiological/perceptual indicators in amateur female futsal players. Thirteen players (24.1 ± 3.7 years) performed a testing battery (countermovement jump (CMJ), Illinois agility and YoYo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YYIR1)) preceded by 15 min of PBMT (1 min 30 s each muscular point; five muscular points in each lower limbs) or 15 min of placebo (SHAM), in a counterbalanced randomized cross-over design (one-week in-between PBMT/SHAM). All test performance did not differ (p > 0.05) between PBMT and SHAM, as well as blood lactate, rating of perceived exertion, heart rate, and muscle oxygenation (via near infrared spectroscopy) responses. The acute application of PBMT prior to a physical testing battery does not influence high-intensity and intermittent exercises performance, neither physiological nor perceptual responses in amateur female futsal players. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Is It High Time to Increase Elite Soccer Substitutions Permanently?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7008; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197008 - 25 Sep 2020
Abstract
Rules determine how team sport matches occur. Match-induced fatigue is specific to each sport, and may be associated with injury incidence. For example, the injury rate in soccer is distinctly higher during matches than in training sessions. Understanding the differences between team sports [...] Read more.
Rules determine how team sport matches occur. Match-induced fatigue is specific to each sport, and may be associated with injury incidence. For example, the injury rate in soccer is distinctly higher during matches than in training sessions. Understanding the differences between team sports rules might be useful for enhancing rules (e.g., safer sport). Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the impact of the rule-induced physical demands between soccer, futsal, basketball, and handball, focusing on substitution rules. Data from the elite team sports’ rules (e.g., absolute and relative court dimensions; the number of players, substitutions allowed, total game time, time-outs) were collected, including the changes due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in soccer substitutions, and comparisons were performed. The data showed that soccer has higher rule-induced physical demands: e.g., substantially lower substitution rate, higher dimensions in absolute (eight to fifteen times), and relative (four to eight times) values. Simulations also showed that soccer has extremely large differences, even considering COVID-19 substitution changes (from three to up to five). We conclude that elite soccer has remarkably higher overall rule-induced physical demands than elite futsal, basketball and handball, and increasing soccer substitutions permanently (e.g., unlimited) might mitigate overall soccer demands. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Ischemia–Reperfusion Intervention: From Enhancements in Exercise Performance to Accelerated Performance Recovery—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8161; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218161 - 04 Nov 2020
Abstract
It has been demonstrated that brief cycles of ischemia followed by reperfusion (IR) applied before exercise can improve performance and, IR intervention, applied immediately after exercise (post-exercise ischemic conditioning—PEIC) exerts a potential ergogenic effect to accelerate recovery. Thus, the purpose of this systematic [...] Read more.
It has been demonstrated that brief cycles of ischemia followed by reperfusion (IR) applied before exercise can improve performance and, IR intervention, applied immediately after exercise (post-exercise ischemic conditioning—PEIC) exerts a potential ergogenic effect to accelerate recovery. Thus, the purpose of this systematic review with meta-analysis was to identify the effects of PEIC on exercise performance, recovery and the responses of associated physiological parameters, such as creatine kinase, perceived recovery and muscle soreness, over 24 h after its application. From 3281 studies, six involving 106 subjects fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Compared to sham (cuff administration with low pressure) and control interventions (no cuff administration), PEIC led to faster performance recovery (p = 0.004; ES = −0.49) and lower increase in creatine kinase (p < 0.001; effect size (ES) = −0.74) and muscle soreness (p < 0.001; ES = −0.88) over 24 h. The effectiveness of this intervention is more pronounced in subjects with low/moderate fitness level and at least a total time of 10 min of ischemia (e.g., two cycles of 5 min) is necessary to promote positive effects. Full article
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