Special Issue "Spatial Epidemiology of Emerging Infectious Diseases"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Kinley Wangdi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Global Health, Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, 63 Eggleston Rd, Acton, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
Interests: vector borne diseases; geospatial health; Bayesian statistics; use of information technology in enhancing public health services
Dr. Nasser Bagheri
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Mental Health Research, Research School of Population Health, College of Health and Medicine, Australian National University, 63 Eggleston Rd, Acton, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
Interests: spatial analysis in chronic diseases; contextual analysis in healthcare ecosystems
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bacterial, viral, and parasitic infectious diseases continue to have a significant impact on global health, particularly emerging infectious diseases such as the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19), Ebola, dengue, chikungunya, and Zika. The etiology and epidemiology of these diseases are complex and many demographic, environmental, and social factors may play a role in the incidence of such diseases. Of these factors, global travel and trade, unplanned urbanization, and climate change have an important impact on the distribution and incidence of emerging infectious diseases. These could facilitate the transmission of pathogens from one region to another region, make transmission seasons longer or more intense, or cause diseases to emerge in countries where they were previously unknown.

Spatial analytical modeling allows for a better understanding these contextual factors and can help policy-makers to develop tailored interventions. Advanced spatial analysis and modeling can help policy-makers to identify high-risk (hot spot) areas and design geographically targeted measures for better resource allocation and disease control. This Special Issue, entitled “Spatial Epidemiology of Emerging Infectious Diseases”, welcomes high-quality original research articles and reviews on any emerging infectious diseases of public health importance.

Dr. Kinley Wangdi
Dr. Nasser Bagheri
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Emerging
  • Infectious
  • Diseases
  • Spatial modeling
  • Epidemiology
  • Ecological
  • Public health

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Epidemiological Analysis of the 2019 Dengue Epidemic in Bhutan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 354; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010354 - 05 Jan 2021
Viewed by 557
Abstract
Bhutan experienced its largest and first nation-wide dengue epidemic in 2019. The cases in 2019 were greater than the total number of cases in all the previous years. This study aimed to characterize the spatiotemporal patterns and effective reproduction number of this explosive [...] Read more.
Bhutan experienced its largest and first nation-wide dengue epidemic in 2019. The cases in 2019 were greater than the total number of cases in all the previous years. This study aimed to characterize the spatiotemporal patterns and effective reproduction number of this explosive epidemic. Weekly notified dengue cases were extracted from the National Early Warning, Alert, Response and Surveillance (NEWARS) database to describe the spatial and temporal patterns of the epidemic. The time-varying, temperature-adjusted cohort effective reproduction number was estimated over the course of the epidemic. The dengue epidemic occurred between 29 April and 8 December 2019 over 32 weeks, and included 5935 cases. During the epidemic, dengue expanded from six to 44 subdistricts. The effective reproduction number was <3 for most of the epidemic period, except for a ≈1 month period of explosive growth, coinciding with the monsoon season and school vacations, when the effective reproduction number peaked >30 and after which the effective reproduction number declined steadily. Interventions were only initiated 6 weeks after the end of the period of explosive growth. This finding highlights the need to reinforce the national preparedness plan for outbreak response, and to enable the early detection of cases and timely response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spatial Epidemiology of Emerging Infectious Diseases)
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