ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

The Role of Physical Activity in Primary Care

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health-Related Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 9041

Special Issue Editors

1. Department of Biostatistics, FIU Robert Stempel College of Public Health and Social Work, Miami, FL 33199, USA
2. Department of Family and Preventive Medicine and Population Health Sciences, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA
Interests: biostatistics; epidemiology; clinical and behavioral studies; cancer; cardiovascular diseases; health care systems; primary care; chronicle diseases; global health; research methods

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Epidemiology, Robert Stempel College of Public Health and Social Work, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA
Interests: cardiovascular health promotion; epidemiology; nicotine; risk factors; substance use; tobacco; women’s health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to organize a Special Issue, entitled “The Role of Physical Activity in Primary Care”, for the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

Physical activity has been shown to be beneficial for primary care patients, especially patients with obesity, depression, chronic diseases, and infectious diseases. Physical activity also improves the quality of life among different groups of patients. In keeping with the importance of physical activity, physical inactivity is an established risk factor for premature mortality and many non-communicable diseases. The global burden of physical inactivity is substantial, with up to 8% of non-communicable diseases and deaths attributed to physical inactivity. The economic burden of physical inactivity is also well documented.

Numerous health benefits have been shown to be linked to engaging in a sufficient volume of physical activity and community-based health programs. Additionally, the promotion of physical activity in primary care has the potential to convert one out of twelve physically inactive individuals to physically active individuals. However, before providing a systematic recommendation regarding physical activity in the primary care setting, comprehensive findings and understanding of this topic, from articles including original research studies, systematic reviews, and analyses of secondary data, need to be generated that are better aligned with the needs of primary care patients and physicians, policymakers, and other healthcare professionals.

This Special Issue aims to provide the research community in primary care with updated information, systematic results, new interventions, and insights into the role of physical activity in primary care. We are interested in high-quality original research and review papers related to physical activity across different groups, including surveillance studies and studies that advance our understanding of the role of physical activity in primary care.

Dr. Nan Hu
Dr. Olatokunbo Osibogun
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • exercise
  • primary care
  • chronic diseases
  • health promotion
  • quality of life
  • community-based intervention
  • health behavior
  • health counseling
  • medical expenditure

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

14 pages, 2512 KiB  
Article
The Association between Physical Activity and Intrinsic Capacity in Chinese Older Adults and Its Connection to Primary Care: China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS)
by Mengping Zhou, Li Kuang and Nan Hu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(7), 5361; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20075361 - 31 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2557
Abstract
Background: In 2015, intrinsic capacity (IC) was proposed by the WHO as a new measure for healthy aging. Evidence has shown that physical activity (PA) benefits the physical and mental health of older adults. However, the association between PA and IC among older [...] Read more.
Background: In 2015, intrinsic capacity (IC) was proposed by the WHO as a new measure for healthy aging. Evidence has shown that physical activity (PA) benefits the physical and mental health of older adults. However, the association between PA and IC among older adults was not well evaluated or reported. This study aims to investigate the association between PA and general and specific IC among Chinese older adults. Method: The study included individuals aged 60 and above from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study in 2015. The IC scores were constructed based on the WHO concept of five domains: psychological capacity, cognition, locomotion, vitality, and sensory abilities. Total PA and leisure PA were measured based on different activity purposes. Linear mixed-effects models and generalized linear mixed-effects models were developed to assess the associations between PA and IC. Results: A total of 3359 participants were included in this study. Older adults who reported some PA were associated with a higher composite IC score, with a mean difference of 0.14 (95% CI: 0.09–0.18, p < 0.001) compared to those who reported no PA. In terms of leisure PA, physically active adults had a higher composite IC score with a mean difference of 0.06 (95% CI: 0.03–0.09, p < 0.001). Older adults with a high level of leisure PA also had a significantly higher composite IC score (diff. in mean = 0.07, 95% CI: 0.01–0.13, p < 0.05) compared to those with low-level leisure PA. In addition, PA was positively and significantly associated with three specific IC domains: locomotion, cognition, and vitality. Conclusions: Improving both general and leisure PA can be an effective way to prevent the decline in IC among older adults, thus reducing the personal and public load of primary healthcare for aging countries such as China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Physical Activity in Primary Care)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 728 KiB  
Article
Objectively-Assessed Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure and Sunburn Occurrence
by Tammy K. Stump, Suzanne Fastner, Yeonjung Jo, Jonathan Chipman, Benjamin Haaland, Elizabeth S. Nagelhout, Ali P. Wankier, Riley Lensink, Angela Zhu, Bridget Parsons, Douglas Grossman and Yelena P. Wu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(7), 5234; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20075234 - 23 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2810
Abstract
Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is the primary modifiable risk factor for melanoma. Wearable UVR sensors provide a means of quantifying UVR exposure objectively and with a lower burden than self-report measures used in most research. The purpose of this study was to evaluate [...] Read more.
Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is the primary modifiable risk factor for melanoma. Wearable UVR sensors provide a means of quantifying UVR exposure objectively and with a lower burden than self-report measures used in most research. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between detected UVR exposure and reported sunburn occurrence. In this study, a UVR monitoring device was worn by 97 parent–child dyads during waking hours for 14 days to measure instantaneous and accumulated UVR exposure. The results showed that the participants’ total UVR exposure was associated with reported sunburn after adjusting for Fitzpatrick skin type and geographic location. It was observed that one standard erythemal dose (SED) increase in the participants’ daily total UVR exposure was associated with reported sunburn (an odds ratio (OR) of 1.26 with a 95% CI of 1.13 and 1.41, and p < 0.001 for parents and an OR of 1.28 with a 95% CI of 1.12 and 1.47, and p < 0.001 for children). A one-SED increase in the participants’ UVR exposure from 10 am to 4 pm was also associated with reported sunburn (an OR of 1.31 with a 95% CI of 1.15 and 1.49, and p < 0.001 for parents and an OR of 1.33 with a 95% CI of 1.12 and 1.59, and p = 0.001 for children). We found that elevated UVR exposure recordings measured by the UVR sensor were associated with reported sunburn occurrence. Future directions for wearable UVR sensors may include their use as an intervention tool to support in-the-moment sunburn prevention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Physical Activity in Primary Care)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 535 KiB  
Article
Validation of the Upper Limb Functional Index on Breast Cancer Survivor
by Jaime Martín-Martín, Bella Pajares-Hachero, Emilio Alba-Conejo, Nuria Ribelles, Antonio I. Cuesta-Vargas and Cristina Roldán-Jiménez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(6), 4997; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20064997 - 12 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1427
Abstract
Breast cancer survivors (BCS) may face functional alterations after surgical intervention. Upper Limb Disorders (ULDs) are highly prevalent even years after a diagnosis. Clinicians may assess the upper limbs after breast cancer. The Upper Limb Functional Index (ULFI) has been validated across different [...] Read more.
Breast cancer survivors (BCS) may face functional alterations after surgical intervention. Upper Limb Disorders (ULDs) are highly prevalent even years after a diagnosis. Clinicians may assess the upper limbs after breast cancer. The Upper Limb Functional Index (ULFI) has been validated across different populations and languages. This study aimed to assess the psychometric properties of the Upper Limb Functional Index Spanish version (ULFI-Sp) in the BCS. Methods: A psychometric validation study of the ULFI-Sp was conducted on 216 voluntary breast cancer survivors. The psychometric properties were as follows: analysis of the factor structure by maximum likelihood extraction (MLE), internal consistency, and construct validity by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Results: The factor structure was one-dimensional. ULFI-Sp showed a high internal consistency for the total score (α = 0.916) and the regression score obtained from MLE (α = 0.996). CFA revealed a poor fit, and a new 14-item model (short version) was further tested. The developed short version of the ULFI-SP is preferable to assess upper limb function in Spanish BCS. Conclusions: Given the high prevalence of ULD in this population and the broader versions of ULFI across different languages, this study’s results may be transferred to clinical practice and integrated as part of upper limb assessment after breast cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Physical Activity in Primary Care)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 691 KiB  
Article
Associations between Primary Healthcare Experiences and Glycemic Control Status in Patients with Diabetes: Results from the Greater Bay Area Study, China
by Junfeng Lu, Hui Yang, Leiyu Shi, Xia Sheng, Yongjun Huo, Ruqing Liu and Ruwei Hu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 1120; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20021120 - 8 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1582
Abstract
Primary healthcare (PHC) plays an important role in diabetes management; community health centers (CHCs) serve as the main providers of PHC. However, few studies have discussed the association between the service quality of PHC and the effects of diabetes management. In this study, [...] Read more.
Primary healthcare (PHC) plays an important role in diabetes management; community health centers (CHCs) serve as the main providers of PHC. However, few studies have discussed the association between the service quality of PHC and the effects of diabetes management. In this study, we explored the associations between experiences of PHC in CHCs and glycemic control status in patients with diabetes mellitus. This study was conducted in six CHCs in the Greater Bay Area of China. In total, 418 patients with diabetes mellitus (44% males and 56% females) were recruited between August and October 2019. We evaluated their PHC experiences using the Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCAT) developed by Johns Hopkins and assessed their glycemic control status by measuring their fasting plasma glucose levels. Binary logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the associations between the patients’ PHC experiences and glycemic control status, adjusting for covariates. The patients with good glycemic control had significantly higher total and dimensional PCAT scores compared with those with poor glycemic control (p < 0.05). Higher PCAT scores were significantly associated with a greater adjusted odds ratios (aORs) of good glycemic control for total and dimensional PCAT scores. For example, compared to those with poor glycemic control, the aORs for those with good glycemic control was 8.82 (95% CI = 4.38–17.76) per total PCAT score increasing. Especially, the aORs for those with good glycemic control were 3.92 (95% CI = 2.38–6.44) and 4.73 (95% CI = 2.73–8.20) per dimensional PCAT score of family-centeredness and community orientation increasing, respectively. Better PHC experiences were associated with better diabetes management. In particular, family-centered and community-oriented CHCs may help improve diabetes management in China and other low- and middle-income countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Physical Activity in Primary Care)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop