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Special Issue "Improving the Quality of Life of Breast Cancer Survivors"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2023 | Viewed by 1950

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Rocio Guil Bozal
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, University of Cádiz, 11519 Cádiz, Spain
Interests: emotional intelligence; quality of life; health emotional regulation
Dr. Paloma Gil-Olarte
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, University of Cádiz, 11519 Cádiz, Spain
Interests: emotional intelligence; development of emotional competencies; social adaptation and well-being; emotional skills and conflict management
Dr. Rocío Gómez Molinero
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, University of Cádiz, 11519 Cádiz, Spain
Interests: emotional intelligence; quality of life; psychosocial and emotional factors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Breast cancer is the most common neoplasia among women, annually affecting 2.1 million worldwide. Both the diagnosis and the adjuvant treatments administered impact not only the physical but also the mental health and quality of life of the patients who suffer from it. Multidisciplinary evaluations of the quality of life will allow providing quality healthcare attention to the health status of patients during this chronic disease, identifying associated comorbidities and offering more individualized assistance.

This Special Issue is intended to propose new approaches regarding the psychological and medical factors that affect the mental and physical health and quality of life of patients and survivors of breast cancer to develop novel intervention proposals that improve the quality-of-life levels and health status of this clinical population.

Dr. Rocío Guil Bozal
Dr. Paloma Gil-Olarte
Dr. Rocío Gómez Molinero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • quality of life
  • mental health
  • physical health
  • healthcare
  • clinical interventions
  • psychological interventions

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Assessing the Expression of Emotions in Breast Cancer Survivors during the Time of Recovery: Perspective from Focus Groups
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9672; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159672 - 05 Aug 2022
Viewed by 309
Abstract
Breast cancer has major public health implications, as it is the most frequent malignant tumor and the leading cause of cancer death in women. Survivors have many needs, including strategies to cope with the associated distress. We explore whether focus groups are useful [...] Read more.
Breast cancer has major public health implications, as it is the most frequent malignant tumor and the leading cause of cancer death in women. Survivors have many needs, including strategies to cope with the associated distress. We explore whether focus groups are useful for nurses to obtain information about the emotional state of breast cancer women, and develop strategies for coping with the stress that this disease entails. A qualitative study was carried out, involving 25 focus groups with 83 women treated for breast cancer, recruited from the local Breast Cancer Association (ALMOM). Four open-ended questions were employed, and 60-min discussions were carried out. They were transcribed, analyzed, coded, and the themes identified. Four major themes emerged, including “complex emotional evolution”, “emotional isolation”, “lack of information” and “inability to give advice”. Women admitted that this disease had been a stressful factor for them, causing emotional (anxiety, irritability, anger or guilt) and cognitive disorders (confusion, lack of concentration, forgetfulness). The use of focus groups in breast cancer survivors allows nurses to evaluate the expression of emotions in these women, and collect and share information about their feelings, thoughts and experiences, so that survivors can cope more easily with the stress related to their illness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving the Quality of Life of Breast Cancer Survivors)
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Article
Idiosyncratic Profile of Perceived Emotional Intelligence and Post-Traumatic Growth in Breast Cancer Survivors: Findings of a Multiple Mediation Model
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(14), 8592; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19148592 - 14 Jul 2022
Viewed by 371
Abstract
Psycho-oncology research suggests that positive personal changes can occur after experiencing breast cancer. These changes can be understood as post-traumatic growth (PTG) and seem to be determined by emotional self-efficacy perception. This study aims to investigate the existence of different profiles of PTG [...] Read more.
Psycho-oncology research suggests that positive personal changes can occur after experiencing breast cancer. These changes can be understood as post-traumatic growth (PTG) and seem to be determined by emotional self-efficacy perception. This study aims to investigate the existence of different profiles of PTG and perceived emotional intelligence (PEI) among breast cancer survivors (BCSs) and healthy controls. Moreover, it aims to study the mechanisms through which PEI may mediate the relationship between disease survival and PTG. The total sample was 636 women divided into two groups: 56 BCS and 580 healthy controls who completed TMMS-24 and PTGI. The results displayed that BCSs apparently show a different profile of PTG and PEI compared to healthy women. The mediation analyses showed that survivorship explained 1.9% of PTG, increasing to 26.5% by the effect of PEI. An indirect effect showed that cancer survival predicts reduced levels of emotional attention, decreasing PTG. However, the most statistical indirect effect evidenced that BCSs regulate their emotions appropriately, having a powerful effect on PTG and counteracting the negative effects of poor emotional attention. Knowing the implications of PEI on PTG could improve follow-up from the time of diagnosis and supporting the patient to cope with the sequelae of the disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving the Quality of Life of Breast Cancer Survivors)
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Article
Impact of Immediate and Delayed Breast Reconstruction on Quality of Life of Breast Cancer Patients
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(14), 8546; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19148546 - 13 Jul 2022
Viewed by 344
Abstract
A mastectomy affects the psychological, social, and sexual well-being of patients. Research has confirmed that breast reconstruction is important for improving the quality of life in patients with breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life of [...] Read more.
A mastectomy affects the psychological, social, and sexual well-being of patients. Research has confirmed that breast reconstruction is important for improving the quality of life in patients with breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life of patients who underwent a mastectomy followed by immediate or delayed breast reconstruction. This prospective study was conducted from January 2018 to March 2020 at the Clinical Hospital Center Osijek, using the health questionnaire SF-36. The study included 79 patients. The results of the study showed that patients who underwent a mastectomy had the lowest scores in the domain of restriction due to physical difficulties, 18.8 (6.3–31.3), in physical functioning and limitation due to emotional difficulties, 16.7 (8.3–33.3), in mental health. In immediate breast reconstruction, patients rated better physical health (p < 0.001), while patients who underwent delayed breast reconstruction rated their mental health worse (p < 0.001) as measured by the SF-36 questionnaire. Conclusion: The results of this study show that patients without breast reconstruction rated their quality of life worse than patients who underwent immediate and delayed breast reconstruction after mastectomy. There is no difference in the quality of life between patients who underwent immediate and delayed breast reconstruction after mastectomy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving the Quality of Life of Breast Cancer Survivors)
Article
General Health and Resilience of Breast Cancer Patients: The Mediator Role of Affective Well-Being
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(9), 5398; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19095398 - 28 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 557
Abstract
A considerable percentage of breast cancer patients present adequate psychological adjustment and do not become distressed after a breast cancer diagnosis, or, if they do, they manage to recover quickly, which is reflected in their general health. This study aims to determine the [...] Read more.
A considerable percentage of breast cancer patients present adequate psychological adjustment and do not become distressed after a breast cancer diagnosis, or, if they do, they manage to recover quickly, which is reflected in their general health. This study aims to determine the role of some psychological mechanisms that affect psycho-oncological adjustment, specifically, resilience and well-being, in a sample of 109 breast cancer patients. For this purpose, participants completed questionnaires on general health, resilience, and well-being (life satisfaction and affect). Correlation analyses and a multiple mediation model were carried out. The results revealed that Pearson correlations between all variables showed strong associations between general health scores and positive and negative affect scores, and moderate associations with life satisfaction and resilience scores. Furthermore; in the mediation model, the total percentage of variance explained by the overall model was 55% (R2 = 0.55), where resilience was associated with positive and negative affect, and that influenced general health. These results show that affective well-being is especially relevant in breast cancer patients in terms of its mediating role in resilience, making it clear that an appropriate intervention focused on managing patients’ affective status can have a favorable impact on their overall health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving the Quality of Life of Breast Cancer Survivors)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Idiosyncratic Profile of Perceived Emotional Intelligence and Post-traumatic Growth in Breast Cancer Survivors: Findings of a Multiple Mediation Model
Authors: Rocío Guil, Paula Ruiz-González, Lucía Morales-Sánchez, Rocío Gómez-Molinero, Paloma Gil-Olarte
Affiliation: Universidad de Cádiz, 11519 Cádiz, Spain

Title: The role of emotion-related abilities in the quality of life of breast cancer survivors: a systematic review
Authors: Ilaria Durosini, Stefano Triberti, Lucrezia Savioni, Valeria Sebri, Gabriella Pravettoni
Affiliations: (1) Applied Research Division for Cognitive and Psychological Science, IEO, European Institute of Oncology IRCCS, 20141 Milan, Italy; (2) Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology, University of Milan, 20122 Milan, Italy

Title: The effect of Inquiry based stress reduction (IBSR) intervention technique on quality of life and well-being of BRCA1/2 carriers during COVID-19 pandemic: A qualitative study.
Author: Shahar Lev-ari
Affiliations: Department of health promotion, School of Public health, Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 39040, Israel

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