Special Issue "Development, Adaptation and Evaluation of Public Health Interventions: A Complex Systems Perspective"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Lisa Pfadenhauer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Pettenkofer School of Public Health, University of Munich (LMU), 81377 Munich, Germany;
2. Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
Interests: implementation science; intervention development; multi method process and outcome evaluations; stakeholder engagement; knowledge translation; evidence synthesis
Dr. Ani Movsisyan
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
The Institute for Medical Information Processing, Biometry, and Epidemiology, Pettenkofer School of Public Health, University of Munich (LMU), 81377 Munich, Germany
Interests: development, adaptation and evaluation of public health interventions; implementation; evidence-informed practices in public health; systematic reviewing and guideline development in public health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last decades, there has been increased recognition of public health interventions being implemented and embedded within complex systems. A complex systems perspective highlights how interventions interact with, influence, and are influenced by the wider system in which they are delivered, regardless of whether they are simple (i.e., monocomponent) or complex (i.e., multicomponent) in design. In this view, public health interventions may impact a range of population health and nonhealth outcomes. Similarly, changes in population health may be brought about by interventions delivered through other sectors, such as education and social welfare. This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on the development, adaptation, implementation, and evaluation of public health interventions incorporating a complex systems perspective. We welcome papers related to any aspect of intervention research, including empirical studies, as well as debates and novel methodological approaches on how interventions are developed and coproduced in social systems involving many stakeholders, and how existing evidence-informed interventions are adapted to and implemented in new contexts, their (re) evaluation, as well as scale-up and uptake. We invite papers using a range of methods, including quantitative (e.g., natural experiments), qualitative (e.g., participatory action research), and mixed-method approaches, as well as innovative methods for the study of complex systems in public health.

Dr. Lisa Pfadenhauer
Dr. Ani Movsisyan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • complex systems
  • implementation
  • context
  • coproduction
  • intervention development
  • intervention adaptation
  • evaluation
  • population health
  • multimethod research
  • evidence-informed interventions

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Using Intervention Mapping to Develop a Media Literacy-Based Smoking Prevention Program for Female Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6305; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126305 - 10 Jun 2021
Viewed by 417
Abstract
Smoking prevalence among female adolescents in South Korea has increased gradually, despite a decreasing trend seen for male adolescents. Smoking scenes or cigarette advertisements in the media have influenced female adolescents’ initiation into smoking. It is therefore crucial to develop a smoking prevention [...] Read more.
Smoking prevalence among female adolescents in South Korea has increased gradually, despite a decreasing trend seen for male adolescents. Smoking scenes or cigarette advertisements in the media have influenced female adolescents’ initiation into smoking. It is therefore crucial to develop a smoking prevention program to enhance female adolescents’ smoking media literacy by implementing gender-specific approach. The purpose of this study is to describe how intervention mapping protocol (IMP) was used to develop a media literacy-based smoking prevention program (MLSP) for female adolescents. The IMP was used in six steps: needs assessment (literature review and focus groups comprising 24 female adolescents and 12 teachers), program goal setting, selection of intervention methods, production of program components and materials, program implementation planning, and program evaluation by ten experts and three adolescents. Six performance objectives and 14 change objectives were generated. Each module consisted of theory-based methods such as raising consciousness. Half of the modules covered topics regarding smoking media literacy, while half covered topics related to gender-specific intervention. The major advantages of utilizing IMP are that MLSP has been developed to reflect multiple perspectives, including of adolescents, teachers, and professors through a systematic process, and identified to be acceptable and valid. Full article
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Article
Redesigning a Healthcare Demand Questionnaire for National Population Survey: Experience of a Developing Country
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4435; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094435 - 22 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 577
Abstract
Since its inception in 1986, the contents of the National Health and Morbidity Survey (NHMS) have been periodically updated to support emerging health data needs for evidence-based policy and program development. In 2018, the healthcare demand questionnaire was redesigned to capture diverse and [...] Read more.
Since its inception in 1986, the contents of the National Health and Morbidity Survey (NHMS) have been periodically updated to support emerging health data needs for evidence-based policy and program development. In 2018, the healthcare demand questionnaire was redesigned to capture diverse and changing population demand for healthcare services and their utilization pattern. This paper describes the methods and processes undertaken in redesigning the questionnaire. We aim to highlight the systematic and inclusive approach, enabling all potential evidence users to be involved, indirectly encouraging research evidence uptake for policy and program planning. We applied a systematic approach of comprehensive literature search for national-level population survey instruments implemented globally and translated non-English tools to English. The development phases were iterative, conducted in parallel with active stakeholder engagements. Here, we detailed the processes in the planning and exploratory phase as well as a qualitative assessment of the questionnaire. We included instruments from 45 countries. The majority were from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries and focused on perceived health, health-related behavior, and healthcare use. Thirty-four stakeholders from 14 areas of expertise were involved. Stakeholders identified additional content areas required, such as chronic pain, alternative use of healthcare services (community pharmacy, home-visit, and private medical laboratory), family doctor, and informal caregiving. The questionnaire, redesigned based on existing literature with concordant involvement and iterative feedback from stakeholders, improved the choice of health topics through the identification of new topics and modification of existing questions to better meet future evidence needs on health problems, strategy, and program planning towards strengthening the nation’s health systems. Full article
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Protocol
A Telephone-Based Tobacco Cessation Program in the State of Qatar: Protocol of a Feasibility Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4750; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094750 - 29 Apr 2021
Viewed by 470
Abstract
In Qatar, tobacco is the leading preventable cause of death and disease. Telephone-based interventions for smoking are cost-effective and scalable interventions that are effective in promoting smoking behavior change. While many countries have implemented these services within their tobacco control programs, there is [...] Read more.
In Qatar, tobacco is the leading preventable cause of death and disease. Telephone-based interventions for smoking are cost-effective and scalable interventions that are effective in promoting smoking behavior change. While many countries have implemented these services within their tobacco control programs, there is a distinct dearth of a telephone-based smoking cessation intervention that is adapted and tailored to meet the needs of people who smoke in Qatar. This study presents the protocol of a primary health care center integrated smoking quitline program in Qatar. Participants will be recruited from seven smoking clinics (recruitment sites). Trained clinic staff will provide brief advice on quitting followed by a referral to the quitline. Eligible participants (male smokers over 18 years of age) will complete baseline questionnaires and receive five weekly proactive counseling calls, an end-of-treatment assessment (approx. 1 week after Session 5), and 1- and 3-month follow-up assessments. The main aim of this study is to assess the feasibility and acceptability, which include the recruitment and retention rate, compliance to pharmacotherapy, and participant satisfaction. This is the first study to integrate an evidence-based smoking cessation intervention delivered via telephone within the healthcare system in Qatar. If effective, results can inform the development of a large-scale telephone-based program that widely reaches users of tobacco in Qatar as well as in the Middle East. Full article
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