Special Issue "Occupational Safety and Health Interventions to Ensure Decent Work for All by 2030"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Julius Fobil
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
University of Ghana School of Public Health, Department of Biological, Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, Legon, Ghana
Interests: Urban environmental health in low-income economies; sanitation infrastructure; neighbourhood environmental conditions, environmental change and area-based socioeconomic inequalities on human health; environmental exposure assessment, environmental waste and pollution, informal sector, electronic waste (e-waste) recycling/processing, artisanal gold mining, informal
Ms. Suvi Lehtinen
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Chief of International Affairs of the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, FIOH, Retired
Interests: Editing and publishing professional journals, communication of information in occupational health, international occupational health, occupational health and development
Prof. Jorma Rantanen
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Public Health/Occupational Health, University of Helsinki, Finland
Interests: Occupational health services, Surveillance of workers’ health, International occupational health and globalization, Evaluation of occupational health, Occupational health risk assessment, Promotion and maintenance of work ability
Prof. Rosemary Sokas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Nursing & Health Studies, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA
Interests: Occupational Health Disparities; Vulnerable Workers; Participatory Action Research; Intervention Effectiveness; Home Care Workers; Construction Workers; Migrant Workers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by all members of the United Nations, is framed around 17 sustainable development goals.  Goal 8 issues a call to “Promote sustained, inclusive, and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all”.  Decent work encompasses dimensions such as security and income, is based on workers having a meaningful voice, and fundamentally predicated on work that is healthy, safe, and secure. Compelling research demonstrates the disproportionate risk encountered by vulnerable workers (such as young, aging or pregnant workers, those with physical impairments or those experiencing multiple disadvantages; workers in high-risk jobs (such as those working in hazardous conditions in construction, mining, agriculture, healthcare, micro-enterprises etc.) and those who may be underserved by reason of social marginalization through lack of work authorization, precarious or extra-legal employment arrangements, or other circumstances. The specific needs of each of these groups present challenges to achieving the goal of decent work for all.  Important research suggests the effectiveness of participatory interventions that utilize labor unions or immigrant worker centers to engage workers’ voices in the safety and health process, but more is needed.  This Special Issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on the evaluation of promising occupational safety and health interventions that promote decent work for all.  Papers that address interventions at all levels are invited, particularly those that engage workers in the development, implementation and evaluation phases.

Prof. Julius Fobil
Ms. Suvi Lehtinen
Prof. Jorma Rantanen
Prof. Rosemary Sokas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Safety Culture
  • Informal Sector
  • Vulnerable Workers
  • Occupational Safety and Health
  • Unions and health
  • Community-Based Participatory Research
  • Occupational Health and Safety in Low and Middle-Income Countries
  • Occupational Health Services
  • Capacity-building
  • Decent work
  • Quality of working life

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
How Much Is Too Much? The Influence of Work Hours on Social Development: An Empirical Analysis for OECD Countries
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 4914; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16244914 - 05 Dec 2019
Abstract
Work is a cornerstone of social development. Quantifying the impact on development of fluctuations in work hours is important because longer work hours increasingly seem to be the norm. Based on an integrative perspective that combines individual, organizational, and social factors, we constructed [...] Read more.
Work is a cornerstone of social development. Quantifying the impact on development of fluctuations in work hours is important because longer work hours increasingly seem to be the norm. Based on an integrative perspective that combines individual, organizational, and social factors, we constructed a model using data from 31 member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The proposed model was used to test the effect of work hours on different levels and to propose feasible suggestions accordingly. The results show that people in developing countries work more hours per week than those in developed countries, and that males work longer hours than females. Furthermore, regression analysis shows that current work hours are having a negative impact on development in OECD countries, especially in developing countries where people are working longer hours. Longer hours, in other words, do not promote development effectively. Specifically, work hours at the individual level are negatively related to health. At the level of organization, work hours are a reverse indicator of organizational performance, and at the level of society, there is a negative relationship between work hours and economic development. This study provides support for the proposition by the International Labour Organization to reduce work hours, and it facilitates our understanding of the relationship between work hours and social development. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Building a Sustainable Construction Workforce
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4202; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214202 - 30 Oct 2019
Abstract
The average U.S. construction worker is aged 42.6 years, and will not be eligible for full Social Security retirement benefits until age 67. Delayed retirement is largely driven by economic need, but construction workers face considerable challenges in remaining on the job. This [...] Read more.
The average U.S. construction worker is aged 42.6 years, and will not be eligible for full Social Security retirement benefits until age 67. Delayed retirement is largely driven by economic need, but construction workers face considerable challenges in remaining on the job. This study explores trade-specific age trends within the construction industry, and the experiences of building trade unions with aging membership. A mixed-methods approach used trade-specific age statistics from the Current Population Survey and key informant interviews with labor leaders, in order to identify union experiences and interventions. Mean and median ages for all subgroups in construction increased from 2003 to 2017. Immigrant construction workers were significantly younger than workers who were born in the U.S. (41 vs. 43, p < 0.001). Union workers were older than non-union workers (42 vs. 39 in 2017, p < 0.001); the age differential between self-employed and wage-and-salary workers was wide (49 vs. 40, p < 0.001). Union leaders described barriers, such as age discrimination and the loss of previously available light tasks, as well as current and potential solutions through union contract language requiring the inclusion of older workers, or establishing limits for lifting. Other solutions included career pathways for training and safety, with their attendant limitations; mentoring/pairing opportunities with apprentices; and the potential opportunities and training needs for site management positions. Full article
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