Next Article in Journal
Comparing Regional Distribution Equity among Doctors in China before and after the 2009 Medical Reform Policy: A Data Analysis from 2002 to 2017
Next Article in Special Issue
Courses on Basic Occupational Safety and Health: A Train-the-Trainer Educational Program for Rural Areas of Latin America
Previous Article in Journal
How Do Time Use and Social Relationships Affect the Life Satisfaction Trajectory of Korean Adolescents?
Previous Article in Special Issue
How Much Is Too Much? The Influence of Work Hours on Social Development: An Empirical Analysis for OECD Countries
Open AccessArticle

Health Consequences for E-Waste Workers and Bystanders—A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study

1
Institute for Occupational, Social, and Environmental Medicine, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany
2
GIZ Ghana Country Office, 7 Volta Street, Accra, Ghana
3
Department of Biological, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG13, Legon, Ghana
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1534; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051534
Received: 23 January 2020 / Revised: 24 February 2020 / Accepted: 25 February 2020 / Published: 27 February 2020
Informal e-waste recycling is associated with several health hazards. Thus far, the main focus of research in the e-waste sector has been to assess the exposure site, such as the burden of heavy metals or organic pollutants. The aim of this study was to comprehensively assess the health consequences associated with informal e-waste recycling. A questionnaire-based assessment regarding occupational information, medical history, and current symptoms and complaints was carried out with a group of n = 84 e-waste workers and compared to a control cohort of n = 94 bystanders at the e-waste recycling site Agbogbloshie. E-waste workers suffered significantly more from work-related injuries, back pain, and red itchy eyes in comparison to the control group. In addition, regular drug use was more common in e-waste workers (25% vs. 6.4%). Both groups showed a noticeable high use of pain killers (all workers 79%). The higher frequency of symptoms in the e-waste group can be explained by the specific recycling tasks, such as burning or dismantling. However, the report also indicates that adverse health effects apply frequently to the control group. Occupational safety trainings and the provision of personal protection equipment are needed for all workers. View Full-Text
Keywords: occupational exposure; occupational health and safety; Agbogbloshie; ergonomic burden; back pain; drug abuse occupational exposure; occupational health and safety; Agbogbloshie; ergonomic burden; back pain; drug abuse
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Fischer, D.; Seidu, F.; Yang, J.; Felten, M.K.; Garus, C.; Kraus, T.; Fobil, J.N.; Kaifie, A. Health Consequences for E-Waste Workers and Bystanders—A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1534.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop