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Special Issue "Nursing System in the Time of COVID-19"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Nursing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 2791

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Manuel José Lopes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Escola Superior de Enfermagem de São João de Deus, Universidade de Évora, 7000-801 Évora, Portugal
Interests: geriatric nursing; functionality; mental health nursing; nursing assessment; nursing education; public health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. César Fonseca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Escola Superior de Enfermagem de São João de Deus, Universidade de Évora, 7000-801 Évora, Portugal
Interests: nursing; interventions; outcomes; patient-centered care
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Lara Guedes de Pinho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Escola Superior de Enfermagem de São João de Deus, Universidade de Évora, 7000-801 Évora, Portugal
Interests: mental illness; psychoeducation; clinical assessment; clinical nursing; psychopathology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

According to the latest WHO report, nursing is the largest occupational group in the health sector, accounting for approximately 59% of health professionals (World Health Organization, 2020). 

Nursing includes the promotion of health, prevention of illness, and the care of ill, disabled and dying people. Advocacy, promotion of a safe environment, research, participation in shaping health policy, inpatient and health system management, and education are also key nursing roles (International Council of Nurses, 2002).

Thus, nurses are present in all health–disease processes throughout the life cycle and in all care settings all over the world.

However, the WHO report also shows us that the world does not have a global nursing workforce commensurate with universal health coverage and SDG targets. In addition, nursing remains a highly gendered profession with associated biases in the workplace (World Health Organization, 2020).

It was in this context that nurses all over the world participated in the collective effort to fight the pandemic by being present on all possible fronts.

This pandemic has been a great challenge to both professional and organizational skills, namely those requiring interprofessional and intersectoral collaboration.

In this context, we intend to investigate the contribution of nursing during the COVID-19 pandemic, considering, among others, the dimensions listed below. We will accept manuscripts from different disciplines, provided that the focus is on the system, the profession, or the discipline of nursing.

  • Intervention at the prevention and control level:
    • Restraint measures
    • Vaccination 
  • Intervention in the provision of care to COVID-19 patients (home and inpatient care):
    • Emergency care
    • Intensive care
    • Rehabilitation care 
    • Follow-up of patients at home
  • Intervention in the definitions of health and management policies and
  • Intervention in the teaching of professionals
  • Intervention at the level of research and development

However, during the COVID-19 pandemic, the remaining care needs of the population persisted. How did nurses respond to these care needs?

Finally, at this stage, when in some countries the post-COVID phase is being prepared, what lessons can we learn from this experience to help us rethink care models and the role of nurses in health systems?

Prof. Dr. Manuel José Lopes
Dr. César Fonseca
Dr. Lara Guedes de Pinho
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • home health nursing
  • critical care nursing
  • primary care nursing
  • advanced practice nursing
  • evidence-based nursing
  • psychiatric nursing
  • rehabilitation nursing
  • emergency nursing
  • public health nursing
  • nursing care

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Fostering Nursing Staff Competence in Personal Protective Equipment Education during COVID-19: A Mobile-Video Online Learning Approach
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9238; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159238 - 28 Jul 2022
Viewed by 445
Abstract
Nursing staff who are competent to use personal protective equipment (PPE) correctly can protect themselves while providing safe, high-quality care to patients. Under pandemic conditions, the ability to wear PPE correctly is essential in clinical practice, but the acquisition of correct PPE-wearing procedures [...] Read more.
Nursing staff who are competent to use personal protective equipment (PPE) correctly can protect themselves while providing safe, high-quality care to patients. Under pandemic conditions, the ability to wear PPE correctly is essential in clinical practice, but the acquisition of correct PPE-wearing procedures is difficult for most staff in the absence of live practice drills. This study aimed to test the mobile video online learning approach by integrating PPE contexts into a digital learning system. We conducted an experiment to verify whether the mobile video online learning approach could effectively improve nursing staff’s learning achievement, learning anxiety, critical thinking skills, and learning self-efficacy. The study used a quasi-experimental design and was conducted with 47 nursing staff, divided into one group using a mobile video online learning approach and one group with a conventional learning approach. We used pre-and post-test examinations of learning achievements, learning anxiety, critical thinking, and learning self-efficacy. Results showed a significant effect of using the mobile video online learning method in helping nursing staff to decrease learning anxiety and improve knowledge about COVID-19 protection, increase learning achievement, critical thinking skills, and learning self-efficacy. These benefits are of interest to nursing workplace managers wishing to maintain professional standards during epidemics by improving the nursing staff’s PPE knowledge and self-efficacy concerning PPE. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing System in the Time of COVID-19)
Article
The Implications of Family Members’ Absence from Hospital Visits during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Nurses’ Perceptions
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 8991; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19158991 - 24 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 492
Abstract
Background: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, several measures were taken to prevent the transmission of infection in the hospital environment, including the restriction of visits. Little is known about the consequences of these directives, but it is expected that they will have [...] Read more.
Background: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, several measures were taken to prevent the transmission of infection in the hospital environment, including the restriction of visits. Little is known about the consequences of these directives, but it is expected that they will have various implications. Thus, this study aimed to understand the consequences of measures to restrict visits to hospitalized individuals. Methods: A qualitative interpretive study was conducted through semistructured interviews with 10 nurses chosen by convenience. Content analysis was performed using Atlas.ti software, version 22 (Berlin, Germany). Results: Twenty-two categories and eight subcategories were identified and grouped according to their scope: implications for the patient, implications for the family, and implications for care practice. Conclusions: The identified categories of implications of restricting hospital visits (implications for patients, relatives, and care practices) are incomparably more negative than positive and have a strong potential to cause safety events in the short to long term, also jeopardizing the quality of care. There is the risk of stagnation and even setback due to this removal of families from the hospital environment, not only in terms of safety and quality of care but also with regard to person- and family-centered care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing System in the Time of COVID-19)
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Article
The Influence of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Clinical Application of Evidence-Based Practice in Health Science Professionals
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(7), 3821; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19073821 - 23 Mar 2022
Viewed by 727
Abstract
(1) Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) informs daily clinical interventions with the purpose of seeking changes to traditional practice through scientific evidence that justifies the reasons for our actions. The objectives were to describe the barriers, beliefs, and attitudes in the application of EBP [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) informs daily clinical interventions with the purpose of seeking changes to traditional practice through scientific evidence that justifies the reasons for our actions. The objectives were to describe the barriers, beliefs, and attitudes in the application of EBP among university health professionals (not doctors) and to evaluate the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic among them. (2) Methods: This prospective study is both descriptive and observational. The individuals under study were university health professionals (not doctors) from various autonomous regions within Spain, in both public and private spheres. Sociodemographic and labor-related variables linked to the research and its completion were studied. Likewise, the survey instrument Health Sciences Evidence-Based Practice questionnaire (HS-EBP) was administered to evaluate the barriers to, beliefs in, and attitudes towards evidence-based practice. (3) Results: A total of 716 responses were gathered, of which 387 were collected during the period of confinement, and 343 in the COVID-19 post-confinement period. Possible associations that might help respond to the objectives were explored through a correlational study between the sociodemographic variables and each sub-scale of the HS-EBP 30 questionnaire (n = 716). (4) Conclusions: Barriers to, beliefs in, and attitudes towards evidence-based practice are described. There is a leadership gap where line management provides insufficient motivation to follow work routines. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused immense stress among health professionals. The post-confinement group showed a significant change in the variables “beliefs and attitudes”, and likewise in the “evaluation” block, justified by the need to update knowledge and to apply evidence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing System in the Time of COVID-19)

Review

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Review
Responses Presented by Adult Patients with COVID-19, Based on the Formulated Nursing Diagnoses: A Scoping Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 6332; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19106332 - 23 May 2022
Viewed by 630
Abstract
(1) Background: this review aims to identify the human responses exhibited by adult patients with COVID-19, by listing the corresponding nursing diagnoses. Nursing diagnosis it’s a clinical analysis of human responses to a person, family, or community. Therefore, it is possible to state [...] Read more.
(1) Background: this review aims to identify the human responses exhibited by adult patients with COVID-19, by listing the corresponding nursing diagnoses. Nursing diagnosis it’s a clinical analysis of human responses to a person, family, or community. Therefore, it is possible to state that nursing diagnoses represent human responses. (2) Methods: a scoping review was conducted following recommendations provided by the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) and the research was carried out between December 2020 and 15 January, 2021, via CINAHL Complete, Complementary Index, MEDLINE, Science Direct, Academic Search Complete, Science Citation Index, Directory of Open Access Journals, Scopus, Social Sciences Citation Index, Business Source Complete, eBook Index (by B-on), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (by Cochrane Library). (3) Results: with respect to studies using the NANDA-I taxonomy, the findings have shown that “impaired gas exchange” was the most highlighted nursing diagnosis. ICNP taxonomy, the relevant nursing diagnosis is “cough present”. (4) Conclusions: concurrently, as suggested by the human responses documented in this review, throughout the pandemic, the requirements for adequate care provision have been constantly updated, to improve the quality of life of those patients, as much as possible. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing System in the Time of COVID-19)
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