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Special Issue "Health Promotion: The Impact of Pyschological Factors on Lifestyle"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 March 2022) | Viewed by 8115

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Luis Ángel Saúl
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: health psychology; acquisition of habits; cognitive conflicts; constructivism; personal meanings; personal construct systems; personal construct psychology; psychotherapy
Prof. Dr. Luis Botella
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Facultat de Psicologia, Ciències de l'Educació i l'Esport (FPCEE) Blanquerna, Universitat Ramon Llull, 08022 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: health psychology; constructivism; personal meanings; personal construct systems; personal construct psychology; psychotherapy; social constructionism; self-narratives

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

According to WHO’s final document on The Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health (WHO, 2004), improvements in lifestyle and the acquisition and maintenance of healthy habits have more significant effects on health than any medical treatment. In addition, this impact on health translates into a socioeconomic effect as well.

The need for health self-care seems more pressing in the context of the current global pandemic, which was caused by SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19). Various investigations have shown that obesity is one of the factors that increase the risk of death when contracting the disease (Kassir, 2020; Rottoli et al., 2020; Samuels, 2020; Simonnet et al., 2020). Therefore, the acquisition and maintenance of healthy habits is extremely important at any time, but even more so in periods of pandemic threat, since these would allow the body to better cope with infections.

However, the prescription of a change in lifestyle, or the simple desire of a person to acquire healthy habits, is not always enough to achieve that goal. The importance of psychological factors such as motivation or locus of control in this process has been repeatedly demonstrated.

The goal of this Special Issue is to explore the impact of pyschological factors on lifestyle and the incorporation of healthy habits.

Prof. Dr. Luis Ángel Saúl
Prof. Dr. Luis Botella
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • health promotion
  • psychological factors
  • lifestyle
  • healthy habits
  • socioeconomic effect
  • health self-care
  • global pandemic
  • obesity
  • autoimmune system
  • health programs
  • responsible economy
  • applied economics

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Article
Motivation and Lifestyle-Related Changes among Participants in a Healthy Life Centre: A 12-Month Observational Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(9), 5167; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19095167 - 24 Apr 2022
Viewed by 388
Abstract
Healthy Life Centers (HLCs) have been established throughout Norway to support lifestyle changes and promote physical and mental health. We conducted a 12-month observational study among participants in an HLC that aimed to improve physical activity (PA) and dietary behaviors, and this study [...] Read more.
Healthy Life Centers (HLCs) have been established throughout Norway to support lifestyle changes and promote physical and mental health. We conducted a 12-month observational study among participants in an HLC that aimed to improve physical activity (PA) and dietary behaviors, and this study examined predictors of completion, and changes in psychological variables, lifestyle behaviors, and physical health indicators. The participants (N = 120, 71% female, mean age = 44 years) reported symptoms of psychological distress (77%) and were obese (77%). No baseline characteristics were found to be consistent predictors of completion (42%). Completers had significant improvements in autonomous motivation for PA (d = 0.89), perceived competence for PA (d = 1.64) and diet (d = 0.66), psychological distress (d = 0.71), fruit intake (d = 0.64), vegetable intake (d = 0.38), BMI among all participants (d = 0.21) and obese participants (d = 0.34), body fat percentage among all participants (d = 0.22) and obese participants (d = 0.33), and lower body strength (d = 0.91). Fat-free mass and all forms of PA remained unchanged from baseline to 12 months. Hence, there were indications of improvement among completers on psychological variables, lifestyle behaviors, and physical health indicators. The low rate of completion was a concern, and the unchanged levels of PA reflect an important area of focus for future interventions in the context of HLCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion: The Impact of Pyschological Factors on Lifestyle)
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Article
Fuzzy Cognitive Maps as a Tool for Identifying Cognitive Conflicts That Hinder the Adoption of Healthy Habits
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1411; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031411 - 27 Jan 2022
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Abstract
Implementing healthy lifestyle habits can take a great effort and sticking to such prescriptions is complicated. Failure rates amongst people seeking to adopt a healthier diet are estimated to be around 80%. Exploring the network of meanings that an individual associates with adopting [...] Read more.
Implementing healthy lifestyle habits can take a great effort and sticking to such prescriptions is complicated. Failure rates amongst people seeking to adopt a healthier diet are estimated to be around 80%. Exploring the network of meanings that an individual associates with adopting habits such as healthy eating, maintaining the correct weight, and practising physical exercise can reveal the inconsistencies, obstacles, or psychological conflicts that hinder change and target-achievement. Fuzzy cognitive maps (FCM) can be of great utility in this task as they allow us to explore the structure of the personal meaning system of an individual as well as determine any obstacles and simulate hypothetical scenarios that project its future evolution. This can help to identify the foci of cognitive conflicts that hinder the adoption of healthy habits and establish more effective personalised intervention programmes that make it easier to maintain these habits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion: The Impact of Pyschological Factors on Lifestyle)
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Article
Influence of Perceived Stress and Stress Coping Adequacy on Multiple Health-Related Lifestyle Behaviors
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(1), 284; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010284 - 28 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 452
Abstract
Stress is a primary target of national health promotion efforts such as Healthy Japan in the 21st century (HJ21). However, little is known about how the combination of perceived stress and coping adequacy influence health-related lifestyle behaviors in line with national health promotion. [...] Read more.
Stress is a primary target of national health promotion efforts such as Healthy Japan in the 21st century (HJ21). However, little is known about how the combination of perceived stress and coping adequacy influence health-related lifestyle behaviors in line with national health promotion. This study assessed the association between combined perceived stress and coping adequacy and multiple health-related lifestyle behaviors in HJ21 practices. This cross-sectional survey that included specialists in health management comprehensively assessed multiple health-related lifestyle behaviors in accordance with HJ21. Total health-related lifestyle behavior scores were calculated and perceived stress and coping adequacy were recorded and categorized into four groups with group 1 to 4 being high to none, and highly adequate to not at all, respectively. The average total lifestyle behavior scores (standard deviation [SD]) were 35.1 (3.5), 33.7 (3.6), 31.8 (3.8), and 30.5 (4.9) for groups 1 to 4 of coping adequacy (p < 0.001). Further, individuals who had higher stress coping adequacy had better multiple health-related lifestyle behaviors after adjusting for demographic factors and perceived stress in the linear trend among the groups. Stress coping skills might be an essential target for stress reduction, ultimately leading to health promotion for disease prevention and longevity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion: The Impact of Pyschological Factors on Lifestyle)
Article
Longitudinal Effects of the Pandemic and Confinement on the Anxiety Levels of a Sample of Spanish Children in Primary Education
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(24), 13063; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182413063 - 10 Dec 2021
Viewed by 859
Abstract
(1) Background: The psychological effects of confinement due to the SARS-CoV-2 virus pandemic on children are only partially known. In Madrid, Spain, children suffered a strict confinement for 10 weeks and they returned to school under conditions that were far from normal. This [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The psychological effects of confinement due to the SARS-CoV-2 virus pandemic on children are only partially known. In Madrid, Spain, children suffered a strict confinement for 10 weeks and they returned to school under conditions that were far from normal. This work assesses the effects of the pandemic on the anxiety levels of a group of children living in Madrid. (2) Methods: Children were aged 6 to 11 years (N = 215). A self-report measure of anxiety was completed by participants at two time-points: (1) a few months before the beginning of the pandemic and (2) 1 year later. A smaller subgroup of participants also completed the measure during the confinement period (n = 60). (3) Results: A comparison of these three measures shows that the children’s anxiety was reduced during confinement, and that one year later these levels continue below those registered before the start of the pandemic. (4) Conclusions: These results contradict some previous studies, which found an increase in children’s anxiety as a result of confinement and the pandemic. The discussion considers protective and vulnerability factors in the context of the pandemic, which may affect children’s levels of anxiety. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion: The Impact of Pyschological Factors on Lifestyle)
Article
Psychological Factors, Leisure Activities, and Satisfaction during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Cross-Sectional Study in Eleven Spanish-Speaking Countries
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11104; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111104 - 22 Oct 2021
Viewed by 991
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the lives of millions of people worldwide. This study aimed to analyze the effects of several psychological factors (self-esteem, self-control, and emotional stability) over lifestyle-related variables (time spent on leisure activities) and the levels of satisfaction (family, friends, [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the lives of millions of people worldwide. This study aimed to analyze the effects of several psychological factors (self-esteem, self-control, and emotional stability) over lifestyle-related variables (time spent on leisure activities) and the levels of satisfaction (family, friends, work, and leisure satisfaction) experienced during the COVID-19 outbreak. Data for this article were retrieved as part of a cross-sectional international study conducted in eleven Spanish-speaking countries between March and September 2020. The analyses were conducted using the responses of 9500 persons (65.95% women, 34.05% men). Structural equation modeling was used to test the direct and indirect effects of the psychological variables on satisfaction variables mediated by the time engaged in leisure activities. Our model indicated that psychological factors significantly predicted the amount of time spent in leisure activities and satisfaction. Overall, results indicate that self-esteem is a relevant psychological factor to consider in the development of psychological interventions directed at promoting healthy lifestyles. Nevertheless, further research is needed to validate the direction of the associations found in this study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion: The Impact of Pyschological Factors on Lifestyle)
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Article
How Are the Links between Alcohol Consumption and Breast Cancer Portrayed in Australian Newspapers?: A Paired Thematic and Framing Media Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7657; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147657 - 19 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 996
Abstract
A dose-dependent relationship between alcohol consumption and increased breast cancer risk is well established, even at low levels of consumption. Australian women in midlife (45–64 years) are at highest lifetime risk for developing breast cancer but demonstrate low awareness of this link. We [...] Read more.
A dose-dependent relationship between alcohol consumption and increased breast cancer risk is well established, even at low levels of consumption. Australian women in midlife (45–64 years) are at highest lifetime risk for developing breast cancer but demonstrate low awareness of this link. We explore women’s exposure to messages about alcohol and breast cancer in Australian print media in the period 2002–2018. Methods: Paired thematic and framing analyses were undertaken of Australian print media from three time-defined subsamples: 2002–2004, 2009–2011, and 2016–2018. Results: Five key themes arose from the thematic framing analysis: Ascribing Blame, Individual Responsibility, Cultural Entrenchment, False Equilibrium, and Recognition of Population Impact. The framing analysis showed that the alcohol–breast cancer link was predominantly framed as a behavioural concern, neglecting medical and societal frames. Discussion: We explore the representations of the alcohol and breast cancer risk relationship. We found their portrayal to be conflicting and unbalanced at times and tended to emphasise individual choice and responsibility in modifying health behaviours. We argue that key stakeholders including government, public health, and media should accept shared responsibility for increasing awareness of the alcohol–breast cancer link and invite media advocates to assist with brokering correct public health information. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion: The Impact of Pyschological Factors on Lifestyle)
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Article
Structural Equation Model of Elementary School Students’ Quality of Life Related to Smart Devices Usage Based on PRECEDE Model
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4301; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084301 - 18 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1142
Abstract
Korean elementary school students have the lowest life satisfaction levels among OECD countries. The use of smart devices has led to smartphone addiction, which seriously affects their quality of life. This study aims to establish and test variables that affect the quality of [...] Read more.
Korean elementary school students have the lowest life satisfaction levels among OECD countries. The use of smart devices has led to smartphone addiction, which seriously affects their quality of life. This study aims to establish and test variables that affect the quality of life (QOL) of elementary school students based on the Predisposing, Reinforcing and Enabling Constructs in Educational Diagnosis and Evaluation (PRECEDE) model, using smart device-related parental intervention, self-efficacy, social support, health promotion behaviors, family environment, smart device addiction, and QOL as measurement variables. Three elementary schools in the Republic of Korea completed self-report questionnaires. Descriptive statistical analysis and hypothetical model fit and test were used for data analysis. The model was found to be valid. Smart device addiction directly affected QOL. In contrast, health promotion behaviors, self-efficacy, social support, and smart device parental intervention indirectly affected QOL. Health-promoting behaviors also directly affected smart device addiction, self-efficacy, and family environment had a direct effect on health-promoting behavior. Therefore, to improve the QOL of elementary school students, the government should focus on developing programs that can help them actively perform health promotion activities and improve self-efficacy, social support, and parental intervention for smart devices that indirectly affect them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion: The Impact of Pyschological Factors on Lifestyle)
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Concept Paper
Revisiting Candidacy: What Might It Offer Cancer Prevention?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10157; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910157 - 27 Sep 2021
Viewed by 719
Abstract
The notion of candidacy emerged three decades ago through Davison and colleagues’ exploration of people’s understanding of the causes of coronary heart disease. Candidacy was a mechanism to estimate one’s own or others risk of disease informed by their lay epidemiology. It could [...] Read more.
The notion of candidacy emerged three decades ago through Davison and colleagues’ exploration of people’s understanding of the causes of coronary heart disease. Candidacy was a mechanism to estimate one’s own or others risk of disease informed by their lay epidemiology. It could predict who would develop illness or explain why someone succumbed to it. Candidacy’s predictive ability, however, was fallible, and it was from this perspective that the public’s reticence to adhere to prevention messages could be explained, as ultimately anybody could be ‘at-risk’. This work continues to resonate in health research, with over 700 citations of Davison’s Candidacy paper. Less explored however, is the candidacy framework in its entirety in other illness spheres, where prevention efforts could potentially impact health outcomes. This paper revisits the candidacy framework to reconsider it use within prevention. In doing so, candidacy within coronary heart disease, suicide prevention, diabetes, and cancer will be examined, and key components of candidacy and how people negotiate their candidacy within differing disease contexts will be uncovered. The applicability of candidacy to address modifiable breast cancer risk factors or cancer prevention more broadly will be considered, as will the implications for public health policy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion: The Impact of Pyschological Factors on Lifestyle)
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