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Concept Paper

Revisiting Candidacy: What Might It Offer Cancer Prevention?

1
Discipline of Public Health, Flinders University, Adelaide 5001, Australia
2
General Practice and Primary Care, Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Luis Ángel Saúl and Luis Botella
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10157; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910157
Received: 24 August 2021 / Revised: 21 September 2021 / Accepted: 24 September 2021 / Published: 27 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion: The Impact of Pyschological Factors on Lifestyle)
The notion of candidacy emerged three decades ago through Davison and colleagues’ exploration of people’s understanding of the causes of coronary heart disease. Candidacy was a mechanism to estimate one’s own or others risk of disease informed by their lay epidemiology. It could predict who would develop illness or explain why someone succumbed to it. Candidacy’s predictive ability, however, was fallible, and it was from this perspective that the public’s reticence to adhere to prevention messages could be explained, as ultimately anybody could be ‘at-risk’. This work continues to resonate in health research, with over 700 citations of Davison’s Candidacy paper. Less explored however, is the candidacy framework in its entirety in other illness spheres, where prevention efforts could potentially impact health outcomes. This paper revisits the candidacy framework to reconsider it use within prevention. In doing so, candidacy within coronary heart disease, suicide prevention, diabetes, and cancer will be examined, and key components of candidacy and how people negotiate their candidacy within differing disease contexts will be uncovered. The applicability of candidacy to address modifiable breast cancer risk factors or cancer prevention more broadly will be considered, as will the implications for public health policy. View Full-Text
Keywords: candidacy; lay epidemiology; breast cancer; cancer; modifiable risk factors; primary prevention candidacy; lay epidemiology; breast cancer; cancer; modifiable risk factors; primary prevention
MDPI and ACS Style

Batchelor, S.; Miller, E.R.; Lunnay, B.; Macdonald, S.; Ward, P.R. Revisiting Candidacy: What Might It Offer Cancer Prevention? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 10157. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910157

AMA Style

Batchelor S, Miller ER, Lunnay B, Macdonald S, Ward PR. Revisiting Candidacy: What Might It Offer Cancer Prevention? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(19):10157. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910157

Chicago/Turabian Style

Batchelor, Samantha, Emma R. Miller, Belinda Lunnay, Sara Macdonald, and Paul R. Ward 2021. "Revisiting Candidacy: What Might It Offer Cancer Prevention?" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 19: 10157. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910157

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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